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Ziess 24 1.8 issue with A6000

Discussion in 'Sony Alpha E-Mount Lenses' started by Mr203, Aug 28, 2015.

  1. Mr203

    Mr203 TalkEmount Regular

    46
    Aug 2, 2015
    MRR
    Guys,
    Just received ziess 24 1.8 and very pleased with the built and photos. However , during experiments I noticed all pictures are coming up blurry if I manually select ISO. For example If I select ISO 100 or 200, everything is blurry. As soon as I switch to AUTO ISO, the shots are beautiful. Do anyone know the issue or experienced same ?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. dbmiller

    dbmiller TalkEmount Top Veteran

    777
    Mar 2, 2012
    New England
    What mode/settings are you shooting with? Sounds like camera shake. Auto ISO is allowing a faster shutter speed so no blur.
     
  3. Mr203

    Mr203 TalkEmount Regular

    46
    Aug 2, 2015
    MRR
    Portrait. I never experienced the issue with ziess 55 1.8. I don't thik the hands are shaking . Auto ISO is perfect.

    Mode /settings ? Can you explain more ?
    I am using potrait and selected Fine and ISO 100.

    After I snap it's so slow . I am shocked .

    Thanks
     
  4. dbmiller

    dbmiller TalkEmount Top Veteran

    777
    Mar 2, 2012
    New England
    Mode - Aperture preferred? Shutter preferred?

    Settings - Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO - Or can you post an example blurred picture?
     
  5. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    It sounds like you're shooting with a shutter speed that's too slow when you're shooting at ISO 100 or 200. I suspect that Auto-ISO is raising the ISO up well above 200 so that the shutter speed can be faster.
     
  6. Mr203

    Mr203 TalkEmount Regular

    46
    Aug 2, 2015
    MRR
    I can't find aperture , shutter speed option in setting ?? Maybe it's under different name menu option.
    Please find attached picture
     
  7. Mr203

    Mr203 TalkEmount Regular

    46
    Aug 2, 2015
    MRR
    How I fix shutter speed ? Do you know the setting option?
     
  8. Mr203

    Mr203 TalkEmount Regular

    46
    Aug 2, 2015
    MRR
    Attached picture
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Mr203

    Mr203 TalkEmount Regular

    46
    Aug 2, 2015
    MRR
    Tried 1.8 ISO 100 and the picture is blurry
     
  10. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    MRR, it sounds like you haven't yet read the operating manual for your camera. I would encourage you to do that, as it may answer a lot of questions you now have. But in any case you're going to have to back up a little and not only learn how to operate your camera, but also about how aperture, shutter speed, and ISO affect each other and how to set them.

    I don't own an A6000, and so I haven't read these books, but both Gary Friedman and David Bush have ebooks out that come highly recommended.

    But in the mean time, you may want to play around with the dial on top of the camera, the one with the P (Program), A (Aperture), S (Shutter Speed), and M (Manual), and see what they can do for you.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  11. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    If you want to have a properly exposed photo, and you're shooting at ISO 100 indoors with low light, then you're going to end up with slow shutter speeds. Aperture, ISO, and shutter speed are linked. You change one, you affect the others.

    If your goal is to shoot sharp photos is low light, you're going to have to boost the ISO well up above 100. Depending on the lack of light, you may have to boost the ISO up to 800, 1600, 3200, or above.

    Set the aperture to f/1.8, put the ISO on Auto, and make sure the focus is correct. You should get a better result.
     
  12. Mr203

    Mr203 TalkEmount Regular

    46
    Aug 2, 2015
    MRR
    Agreed , I get the good result with auto. I was just wondering why ISO 100 blurry indoor at night . Thanks for your help
     
  13. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Because setting the ISO at 100 forces the camera to require more light for a properly exposed photo. Higher ISOs require less light. The camera can compensate for not enough light in two ways: use a wider aperture or a slower shutter speed. In your case it chose a slower shutter speed because your aperture was already wide open. And the slow shutter speed causes the blurring you see.

    Have you set your viewfinder and LCD to display the information about ISO, aperture, and shutter speed? Your manual will tell you how to do that. But if you have that information in view when taking a photo, you can easily tell how the three settings interact.
     
  14. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    As David has explained, ISO is the camera's sensitivity to available light. ISO 100 is usually used when light is plentiful, or enough available to achieve the result you want from your exposure. Imagine on a very sunny day. Just like the aperture of a camera, the iris in the pupils of your eyes adjust as you go outside into a very bright environment. The iris's close to let in less light so to see a balanced view, like a camera's exposure.
    If it's still way too bright outside for comfort, we put on sunglasses. The tint impedes light entering, thus reducing our sensitivity to the brightness. The amount of tint can be compared to ISO.

    You set ISO to 100, and it's like wearing sunglasses at night. (remember that song?) :)
    f/1.8 and ISO 100 means the camera is setting the shutter to 1/3" second. Unless you are robocop and your daughter can stay still for a second, any little movement blurs the photo.

    Since you have 'Portrait' and was able to set ISO, that means 'Portrait' as in Creative Style setting. There is another Portrait setting under SCN select which is fully Auto. And you can't change ISO.

    The setting knob has a number of useful options to try first and to get used to the camera. The a6000 can do a lot so might as well try the features. You can review the photo's EXIF data later to learn how each shot was achieved by the camera. All settings are recorded.

    Don't be embarrassed to shoot under one of the 3 Auto Program settings (P iS iA). Program mode will configure the camera faster than any pro can under constant changing conditions. If you wish to take a portrait at f/1.4, set it to A, aperture priority mode. The camera will select shutter speed and ISO. Auto ISO is a great modern camera feature. You only select custom ISO for composing a shot for a desired exposure.
    ie. shooting at night at stars, manual-focus lenses in bright daylight, fast-motion action photography.
     
  15. Mr203

    Mr203 TalkEmount Regular

    46
    Aug 2, 2015
    MRR
    Thank you . This help.
     
  16. Mr203

    Mr203 TalkEmount Regular

    46
    Aug 2, 2015
    MRR
    Thank you the explanation helps