Wow...if you need to boost performance on an older PC / Laptop !!

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by roundball, Jan 25, 2016.

  1. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    In beginning to research 2016 Laptop reviews for possible replacement of my laptop I ran across something, tried it, and the results are incredible.

    As we know, PCs & Laptops normally have Hard Drives in them that are motor driven spinning disks...and in spite of continuous housekeeping on their contents, the mechanical Hard Drives gradually slow down over time. Five years ago I bought what was a maxed out, top of the line Lenovo Thinkpad T510 laptop and it had gradually gotten slower and slower this past year or so.


    However, the current crop of Solid State Drives have no such mechanical issues and in addition, current technology makes them blindingly fast. Decided to try one, replaced the 500GB Hard Drive in my laptop with a 500GB SSD (Solid State Drive).

    Used to take 4 minutes to completely boot up and bring up everything I had set to open...now it takes 45 seconds !! And opening / closing applications, processing photos, etc, the screens basically just blink. Huge ROI for $150 compared to dropping $1800 for a new top of the line laptop...my current laptop may well be good for a couple more years now.
     
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  2. Mus Aziz

    Mus Aziz TalkEmount Top Veteran

    575
    Sep 3, 2015
    Mus
    I did the same with my Macbook Pro. Replaced the hard drive last year with an SSD, and it made a world of difference to the laptop's performance. Will do the same soon for my iMac. :2thumbs:
     
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  3. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    SSDs are nice! They are an excellent upgrade for desktops too.
    Take your old HDD and install it into a cheap USB case and you'll have an extra USB drive to back up your data.

    Note, if you're running Windows, there are some settings to the OS you can deactivate to optimize for performance of an SSD. Search for some websites that discuss how to do so.
     
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  4. HabsFan

    HabsFan TalkEmount Veteran

    259
    Apr 10, 2013
    Ontario, CAN
    I built a desktop last year with the OS (Now Win 10) on an SSD. First thing that amazed me was how fast the OS install went. My computer takes about 10 -15 seconds to boot up. Granted, I don't have anything opening automatically but I was used to minutes. Processing photos is not as speedy because I am still storing photos on a conventional HDD as a 2TB SSD probably costs more than my whole build.
     
  5. bdbits

    bdbits TalkEmount Veteran

    414
    Sep 10, 2015
    Bob
    Bear in mind a lot of the SSD optimization advice out there is for Windows 7; 8 & 10 should be good by default. Even 7 had later updates that set a lot of the recommendations by default.

    Also, make sure you have backups and they are working. Unlike a hard drive, when an SSD goes bad you're likely dead in the water and there is pretty much no chance to recover anything.

    I still keep my photos and other data on the old hard drive for now. You can move the default locations for documents, etc. in Windows. When I bought an SSD a while back I could only afford a 256G one, so not everything was going to fit, so I figured I would just keep all my data on the HD. I will say the prices keep falling though, you can pretty easily find 1T drives for under $400 and the 256G drives around $140-ish. I think the days for my internal hard drives are numbered. I can still see some life left in them for backup drives, though, just due to the relative low cost per gig.
     
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  6. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    I've been thinking of SSD for my recently bought HP envy 17" i7 !!!
     
  7. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Hard drives have a lot of circuitry on them as well...could totally fail just as easy and I'd be dead in the water as far as my recovery capabilities go.
    I do a complete 100% clone of my drives every 2 weeks, and the one at the first of each month goes off site into a safe deposit box at my bank.
    These Samsung 500gb SSD's have 5 (or 10) year warranties and were down to $150 at Amazon.
     
  8. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Yeah, I moved to a 512MB SSD on my 15" MacBook Pro three years ago. Best upgrade ever!
     
  9. WestOkid

    WestOkid TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 25, 2014
    New Jersey, USA
    Gary
    Wow! You did that when 512gb cost about the same as an arm. Maybe not your good arm. :)

    About 2 years ago, I updated 3 PCs and a server with 60gb-250GB SSD boot drives depending on what I used them for. My Laptop came with an SSD. I couldn't see using a HDD as an OS drive anymore.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2016
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  10. Nexnut

    Nexnut TalkEmount Top Veteran

    I have a 1TB Samsung in my Asus Zenbook, boot time (Win 8.1) 6 seconds; no way back to HDDs :).
     
  11. quezra

    quezra TalkEmount Top Veteran

    916
    Aug 22, 2012
    Heh I went SSD about 5 years ago for my PC boot drive and 3 years ago on my laptop... I thought this thread was a spoof of some kind and couldn't figure it out. :p

    Congrats on your acquisition roundball! There's no going back - luckily at current prices:storage ratio there's no reason why one would ever have to now either!
     
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  12. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Your post got me curious, Gary. So I went back and checked my records. At the time it only cost me $179.99 from OWC.

    Of course, the first >1GB hard drive I ever bought back in the early '90s cost me US$4000 for a 4GB hard drive. :eek-30:
     
  13. MAubrey

    MAubrey TalkEmount Top Veteran

    That's a good price even today!
     
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  14. quezra

    quezra TalkEmount Top Veteran

    916
    Aug 22, 2012
    Heh I think some time around 1993 or so my dad got these Iomega removable HDs, 40MB for about $80 each or something (these were before their famous Zip drives which we also later got). 4GB then would have meant 100 HDs! $4000 wasn't a terrible price for 4GB back then :p
     
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  15. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Oops! I see from my old receipt that what I bought three years ago was a 480GB SSD, not a 512GB. Sorry about the misinformation. Still not a bad price, I think.
     
  16. MAubrey

    MAubrey TalkEmount Top Veteran

    Sounds like it was 512 with a little extra over provisioning. That was (and still is) fairly common.
     
  17. bdbits

    bdbits TalkEmount Veteran

    414
    Sep 10, 2015
    Bob
    Those of you who enjoy computers might find this long-term SSD endurance test interesting. Suffice it to say reliability - at least with the better SSDs - is on par with hard drives.

    The SSD Endurance Experiment: They're all dead
     
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  18. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Earlier on I upgraded a Windows desktop PC by adding a 128GB SSD and I put the Lightroom catalog with its previews on that, leaving the raw files on a 2TB HD. Speeded up working in Lightroom a lot, even while LR and all the other programs still resided on the conventional HD.
     
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  19. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    And it gets better...have learned that a high speed 3.0 USB adapter card is made that works in the Thinkpad models that originally only had USB 2.0 ports...plugs into an existing empty PCI Adapter slot, providing two of the faster USB 3.0 ports.
     
  20. dbmiller

    dbmiller TalkEmount Top Veteran

    777
    Mar 2, 2012
    New England
    More than likely a difference in time when a Gb was truly a Gb (1024*1024*1024) and not 1,000,000,000 bytes.

    480*1024*1024*1024=515,396,075,520 which is real close to your expected 512Gb.

    I think Microsoft still reports the 1024^3 value. Disk manufacturers have all switched over to 10^9 values.