Why Carry a Decent Point and Shoot and Use It?

bobbill

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Am a trite amature who carries two cameras, sometimes.
Having missed some decent pics due to time it takes to access camera, maybe change lens, etc, I have developed a habit of always having a ready to go point and shoot camera available for quick access...not a phone...I really do not care for my phone in most respects, preferring images instead.
I figure an image on a point ant shoot is better than a scant memory of what could have been.
Yes, I understand and reason that some just carry "the main" bod at the ready...but maybe not always easy to do...
Anyone else feel and do similar?
 
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Tipton

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If I have a long tele lens on my main camera for the day, I frequently have a small camera with a wider angle of view also. Usually my Fuji-X70, or my Pentax Q.
 
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I don't even have a P&S camera, only my phone. I often carry my camera around my neck and if not, it's usually in a small sling bag. Even if I go the bakery to get our daily fresh bread ( a 5 min. walk), I mostly carry my camera. I once had to go back when I saw a photo opportunity and didn't have the camera with me.
 

bobbill

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Ad, I get it, just do not want to sling the thing all the time...so the P&I in area or mon posh...like when fishing or once on way to pub, where only P&I goes saw two boys walking on a ledge...after school, which I know I will never behold again, so the P&I would offer some solace. My one TS3 takes marvelous pics.

I used to carry a Minox GL 35 and now wonder what similar carrying dodgers do now?
 

AlwaysOnAuto

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I have 5 of these SD1000's, one is for my wife. I usually carry one in a small case with me when I go out of the house in the car. They take great video and macro photo's too. Regular photos are fine too. Small as a pack of cigarettes, they don't take up a lot of space. I don't mind if the least 'beautiful' one gets greasy either so it gets garage duty when I'm working on the car and want a picture. Great little camera, IMO, I highly recommend them.
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Richard Crowe

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Actually an A6xxx camera with a kit lens is a pretty small (and if you choose an A6000), a relatively inexpensive option. This camera set up as a "P&S Type" camera is easy to carry around. Use the 12mm f/2.0 Rokinon lens on the A6xxx camera and the image quality is excellent. The size of the package is really small but, the versatility is somewhat reduced because it is a prime lens and manual focus.
However, the wide angle of the 12mm is very much like what you get with a cell phone and the focus is easy to nail with this lens and the focus assist and peaking of the A6xxx type camera.
 

Biro

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I have 5 of these SD1000's, one is for my wife. I usually carry one in a small case with me when I go out of the house in the car. They take great video and macro photo's too. Regular photos are fine too. Small as a pack of cigarettes, they don't take up a lot of space. I don't mind if the least 'beautiful' one gets greasy either so it gets garage duty when I'm working on the car and want a picture. Great little camera, IMO, I highly recommend them.
View attachment 109850
I had an SD1000. It offered extraordinary image quality in good light - far better than any other camera of its size in its day - despite its tiny 1/2.5-inch sensor. Yes, it's true point-and-shoots have been largely replaced by smartphones. But only the best smartphone cameras are "good enough."
 

davect01

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I had an SD1000. It offered extraordinary image quality in good light - far better than any other camera of its size in its day - despite its tiny 1/2.5-inch sensor. Yes, it's true point-and-shoots have been largely replaced by smartphones. But only the best smartphone cameras are "good enough."
No mechanical zoom is the biggest shortcoming of a cell phone (you can get zoom attachments) but the image quality of the latest cell phones is pretty good and more than enough for me.
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Most cell phones these days have "Pro" modes that let you adjust all the various settings and some are even allowing you to shoot RAW.

Some really talented cell phone photographers out there
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/sony-world-photography-awards_n_6976552
 

AlwaysOnAuto

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I think the most impressive use of an SD series camera are the images Will [WNG] has shown us with his stitched coast line views from his bike ride. I think he used an SD790.
 

WNG

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I think the most impressive use of an SD series camera are the images Will [WNG] has shown us with his stitched coast line views from his bike ride. I think he used an SD790.
Thank you! Humbled by the high praise. And yes, it's a SD790 IS. I still use it and prefer falling back to my point-n-shoots than my phone. I know what I can do with my cameras, and I think that familiarity helps with the results.
I would need to upgrade my phone to match them. Presently, I can also retrieve the RAW files from my SD790 IS if I wanted.
 

bobbill

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Always on...those SD cameras are nice, almost bought one, but needed shock and water proof on occasion, so went with the "old" TS3s.

Use these various P&Is more often than we care to admit...I do...like "x" tool in garage...?
 
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bdbits

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I've not owned one for quite a few years now. I rarely use my cell phone either, and often carry my camera with me even for a trip to the store. Cell phone cameras have improved a lot, especially if you are willing to spend lots of money on a cell phone anyway, but for me I strongly prefer an actual camera.
 

bobbill

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bdbits, last reading had phones at 2MB sensors, which is not much considering 16s in most PI rigs.

I am like you, save I carry the P&I in pocket mostly and leave the bigger rig in bag, in car, especially when fishing or tramping around.
 

bdbits

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Cell phone sensors are now commonly 12M on the low end up to 48M and more at the high end (at least on the main back-side camera, front is often lower). The sensor itself however is much smaller than most any other camera in common use, which leads to limitations for things like depth of field effects (e.g. bokeh). Hence, the deep interest in computational photography for cell phone makers.
 

bobbill

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Believe ya. I must have read the item wrong at 2mg...
 

bobbill

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Cell phone sensors are now commonly 12M on the low end up to 48M and more at the high end (at least on the main back-side camera, front is often lower). The sensor itself however is much smaller than most any other camera in common use, which leads to limitations for things like depth of field effects (e.g. bokeh). Hence, the deep interest in computational photography for cell phone makers.
FWIW...just found this stuff...

Full-frame image sensors are 35mm in diameter, the same size as old school celluloid film. Hence the name full-frame. There are many smaller frame sensors (known as crop sensors), and smartphone sensors are found at the tail end of the spectrum.
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Various sensor sizes. Source: techspot.com
A full-frame 35mm sensor measures 864mm2 while a 1/1.7” smartphone sensor only measures 43mm2. That means the once-praised Huawei P30 Pro’s sensor, for example, is 20 times smaller than a full-frame DSLR sensor. That’s a lot!
 

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