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What setting to use for lightening strikes?

Discussion in 'Sony Alpha E-Mount Cameras' started by Bernie, Jul 12, 2016.

  1. Bernie

    Bernie New to TalkEmount

    7
    Jul 12, 2016
    Hello new to forum have had my camera for a year now. I have a Sony emount A3000 I love it. Not bad camera so far. However I am having issues with the settings for lightening strikes. I have tried everything too my eyes at least So I figured ok its like trying to find a needle in a hay stack and the directions are very weak out there and the book is useless for setting knowledge.

    Please if i can at least pointed in the direction to the setting id be very grateful! thank you so much..
     
  2. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Never tried it myself.

     
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  3. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    The video hits on all the basics.
    Have a steady tripod to mount the camera to. A wide angle focal length is desired. You didn't mention lenses, so pick the widest one you have. For the Sonys, set the aperture to its sweet spot of f/5.6-f/9, be sure to get a sharp full frame image. If it comes with a lens hood, use it to keep any stray rain drops from hitting the front element.
    I don't use any filters attached, because even some of the best filters will produce glare and reflection due the intense brightness of the lightning.
    If the camera has long shutter noise reduction, have it enabled to reduce hot pixels.
    I set the timer delay to either 2 or 10 sec. to reduce camera shake. Or you can use a remote like suggested in the video.
    I set ISO to 100, shutter to 30 sec. less if there is high strike activity. Experiment with white balance to yield the sky color desired. Some areas have a lot of light pollution from street lights. I use AWB as my default lightning white balance.
    Manual focus is easier to use. Find a spot you can zero in the focus on, a distant light, mountain ridge, a bright star, etc. AF will hunt and guess and may result in a blurred image.
    Then the rest is luck.

    Sometimes you get really lucky!

    14902508095_712b52ecd7_h. The Lost Dutchman is Restless by wNG 555, on Flickr
     
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  4. WestOkid

    WestOkid TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 25, 2014
    New Jersey, USA
    Gary
    Love this shot!
     
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  5. chalkdust

    chalkdust TalkEmount Veteran

    282
    Sep 25, 2015
    Bert Cheney
    Very long ago, in college, I worked at a thunderstorm research laboratory, Langmuir Lab. We used H alpha filters to photograph lightning even in daylight. Lightning is brighter than sunlight and happens so fast that it would be invisible to human eyes but for the fact that its brightness "bleaches" the retina. H alpha filters are extremely narrow band filters that allow a wavelength of light that is not strong in sunlight but is strong in lightning, which ionizes hydrogen. The upside of using them is that you can leave your shutter open for a long time because very little non-lightning light will get through them. This relaxes the "luck" element in lightning photography. The downside is that you may get images with only lightning in them and very little contextual environment - very scientific looking, but perhaps not good as landscape plus lightning.

    A quick google search with "h alpha filter lightning" brought up a paper by Salanave and Brook and a book by Salanave. I have read neither. But I remember Marx Brook well, having worked in the same lab with him and having taken an Electricity and Magnetism class taught by him.

    All very, very long ago....
     
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  6. bdbits

    bdbits TalkEmount Veteran

    406
    Sep 10, 2015
    Bob
    Cool story, Bert.

    For what it's worth, you can also buy "lightning triggers". As I understand it, they work off the premise that lightning is actually a series of flashes, so this triggers off the first one faster than you can respond. Interesting concept. I have never used them but would like to try sometime. On the other hand, it kind of takes out the challenge, doesn't it? :)
     
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  7. Bernie

    Bernie New to TalkEmount

    7
    Jul 12, 2016
    Thank you Everyone for the responses!! I have some reading and trial and error to do! I am in the land were the northern lights is also my play ground. We are on our patio and we get birds eye view ill post what I have after a coffee or two. I do have tripod as well just have not invested in any lenses which i am hinting at my husband haha..

    have a peek here at viewbug album so far im also trying the speed in motion setting which i find is awesome. so i have the sony A3000 i could stand to use another lense tho lol

    "Love is upside DOWN" by bernieawishinski
     
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  8. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    have fun
     
  9. Bernie

    Bernie New to TalkEmount

    7
    Jul 12, 2016
    Dave? your Nixon can them settings be applied to a sony A3000? thank you.. I dont have remote yet I want to get that and that window suckition omg.. where did you get that???? please.. ty...

    Ohhh Sure pet peeve here. I wake up to an email on yellow alert on the northern light show was held in the sky at 4 am ya like im going to get up at that hour for that. sighs... lol any ways also if anyone on here knows bout the settings for Northern lights ? now is the waiting game for weather action to happen its sunny now so means we just might get some action this later afternoon. The way its been lately here. Im in Canada Alberta,, so we been having loads of weather issues.. talk with you all soon now..
    Mrs. Wishinski

    to view more of my northernlight shots

    Facebook friend request to view the photos to yap etc.
     
  10. Bernie

    Bernie New to TalkEmount

    7
    Jul 12, 2016
    Well how typical. got the information I needed for setting up for lightening strikes in here THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU what a pet peeve it is to find out since then we had no lightening lmfao!!! on the plus side im learning every thing I can.. we need more of this Emount alpha3000 sony instructions.. will post photos when it happens lol...
     
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  11. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Unpredictable for sure

    Sent from my GT-N5110 using TalkEmount app
     
  12. Bernie

    Bernie New to TalkEmount

    7
    Jul 12, 2016
    been googling it out since I got the camera there is not much on sony emount alpha 3000 out there.
     
  13. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    One of the guys here used to shoot the a3000, you can try messaging him for some advice. "Hawkman" is his handle.
     
  14. Hawkman

    Hawkman TalkEmount Top Veteran

    941
    Sep 10, 2013
    Virginia, USA
    Steve
    Will, thanks for the intro.

    Bernie, while I have an a6000 now, I still have and use my a3000, and I took some of my best and favorite photos with it. From an image quality standpoint I would say that it can be a match for most any APS-C camera.

    And the a3000 has all of the same major operation modes as any other Sony ILC, including P, A, S, and M modes. You should be able to find and adjust on an a3000 most any setting that you can with a Nikon APS-C camera or another Sony camera. The menu system is different than the newer a5100, a6000, a6300, and the a7 series, but is similar to the earlier NEX cameras, particularly the NEX-3N and F3.

    There are some capabilities of the newer cameras that the a3000 does not have, but all the basic features are there.

    As for the specific inquiry about lightning photos, I can't say I know much there, but if you find a set of ISO, aperture, shutter speed and white balance settings for another camera, you should be able to apply those to the a3000 as well. Additionally, I noticed above a mention of particular types of filters that might be useful for lightning. Presumably, as filters are applied to the lenses and the a3000 uses the same lenses as any ILC, you should be able find and use those filters for the lenses of your a3000.

    And feel free to ask any further questions you might have. I'm no expert, but I'll answer as best I can whatever I can.




    Sent from my iPad using TalkEmount mobile app
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2016
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