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What is exposure compensation and how it works?

Discussion in 'Sony Alpha E-Mount Cameras' started by alaios, Mar 25, 2013.

  1. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    Dear all,
    In the nex-f3 manual there is a button for changing the exposure and make images look less bright or dark.

    What I do not yet understand

    1. why this is a useful feature? What about the triangle f,shutter speed and iso selection?
    2. How it works in the camera once I have set up manually the f the shutter speed and the iso? Is it a way to make the camera to change the iso or is a short of filter applied after the image is captured?

    I would like to thank you in advance for your help

    Regards
    Alex
     
  2. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    Exposure compensation is very useful for several reasons. One of them is that camera doesn't know anything about what you are photographing. Automatic exposure works by measuring the light and adjusting aperture, speed and iso in a such way that normal subject is correctly exposed. In many cases photographer don't want correct exposure but wants low/high key. In some cases subject is much darker/lighter than surroundings.

    I have the exposure compensation adjusted to +1 EV most of time. Slight overexposure is easier to correct than heavy underexposure if you shoot raw.
     
  3. Grisu_HDH

    Grisu_HDH TalkEmount Veteran

    397
    Dec 16, 2012
    Southern Germany
    Markus
    Exposure can be adjusted by changing either the lens f-number or the exposure time; which one is changed usually depends on the camera's exposure mode. If the mode is aperture priority, exposure compensation changes the exposure time; if the mode is shutter priority, the f-number is changed. If a flash is being used, some cameras will adjust it as well.
    You are not setting the actual exposure settings, that is still left up to the camera's electronic, what you are doing is telling the camera that you are not completely satisfied with its calculations and adjusting them slightly.

    Let's say you take a picture of a person sitting in front of a dark background. The camera might see all those dark colors and try to make them properly exposed, but this will make the person in the resulting picture way too bright. To "force," or compensate, the camera to expose the person properly, bring the exposure compensation down below zero. The correct amount will be dependent on the scene, and experimentation is definitely encouraged.
     
  4. Javcky

    Javcky TalkEmount Rookie

    12
    Apr 17, 2012
    In a nutshell, Exposure Compensation is a feature that allows you to "indirectly" modify the Shutter speed or Aperture depending on the mode you are shooting in. This mode of course does not exist in Full Manual since you are "directly" controlling these aspects. As stated above tweaking EC in Shutter Priority will modify Aperture and in Aperture, the reverse is true. This can be likened to shooting in manual but you do not have the full range or precision of "direct" control of these aspects.
     
  5. Mattithjah

    Mattithjah TalkEmount Veteran

    244
    Jan 17, 2013
    Czech Republic
    Matěj
    Exposure compensation said: Hey, Mr. Light metter, do not count exposure with 18% grey tone matrix, but use some brighter or darker matrix. "Count exposure" mean setting of ISO, time and aperture.

    Understanding Camera Metering and Exposure
     
  6. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    Thanks and how this work together with the white balance where you select the type of lightning there is the scene?
     
  7. Grisu_HDH

    Grisu_HDH TalkEmount Veteran

    397
    Dec 16, 2012
    Southern Germany
    Markus
    WB is a totally different aspect in fact.
    It tells the camera how to interpret and "see" the colors corresponding to the surrounding lights.
     
  8. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    and why the white balance is important? I have been seeing it as a way to get different "feelings" at the same exposure. Which one is more prefered? Is it a matter of taste? Do you have any guide that explains that?
    R.
    A
     
  9. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Light has different color "temperatures," depending on the environment. So interior shots under incandescent lighting will appear much "warmer" than shots taken outside on a cloudy day. If you want your pictures to accurately reflect the available light, you will want to have your white balance set to the correct color temperature for the conditions. Of course, you can also experiment with "wrong" settings to achieve different looks, or you can just shoot raw with the AWB setting and then correct to taste when you post process your images. But as others have mentioned, white balance has nothing to do with exposure.
     
  10. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    Do you have some tutorial in mind on how I can try the bit "different". It sounded intresting
     
  11. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    No, I don't believe any such tutorial exists. It's not something anyone usually does unless they're just "messing around." If it interests you, why not just set your white balance to a "wrong" position (like: Incandescent on a cloudy day) and see what the result is? You won't be harming anything on your camera if you do that.
     
  12. Amamba

    Amamba TalkEmount All-Pro

    Apr 13, 2013
    SE MI