What do you think?

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by dixeyk, Nov 19, 2015.

  1. dixeyk

    dixeyk TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jun 18, 2012
    Bellingham . WA
    Kevin
    I just picked up a Olympus Pen-F 38/1.8 on auction for a really good price. The lens arrived and it is absolutely pristine You'd be hard pressed to tell it from new. I've had a few of these lenses and I can honestly say I have never seen one in such nice condition...BUT the aperture blades are slow to retract (looks like oil on them). Normally I would send it back but as I said I have never see one this nice (body, glass, lack of dust ) I got to thinking that it really wouldn't have much effect on my shooting considering how adapted lenses work on my NEX.

    What would you do? I got it for a good price. The seller didn't mention oil on the blades. Is it something I might be able to fix myself? Should I even bother? I'm open to suggestions.
     
  2. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    I confess that I know almost nothing about what might cause aperture blades to retract slowly, nor what possible harm oil on them might do to their functionality/longevity. But since you're familiar with the lens and like what it does, then how about sending it in to have it CLA'd? Would it cost more than the lens is worth? If so, then I'd ship it back to the seller. Having a semi-functional lens would just annoy me after a while.
     
  3. dixeyk

    dixeyk TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jun 18, 2012
    Bellingham . WA
    Kevin
    Well, as far as I can tell it shouldn't effect images but I don't know for sure. It's my understanding that it comes form the grease in the lens breaking down. I had thought of a CLA but I haven't got clue one what it costs. I hear there is an Olympus tech (zuiko.com) that is THE person to send it to but it's an 8-12 week turn around. Still, I do like the lens and after. CLA it would really be pretty cool.

    I guess I better get an estimate.
     
  4. dixeyk

    dixeyk TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jun 18, 2012
    Bellingham . WA
    Kevin
    So it's anywhere between $70 and $150 to get the lens serviced, and that would be with an 8-12 week turnaround. Worst case I'm looking at $275 for the lens (including purchase price). It's in great shape and a fun lens but not all that much nicer than my Konica 40...and definitely not worth almost $300.

    For that money I can thing quite a few things I would get instead.
     
  5. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    Yeah, I would send it back too or ask the seller for a small discount (ie to cover a little the service cost) if you want to keep the lens ;)
     
  6. dixeyk

    dixeyk TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jun 18, 2012
    Bellingham . WA
    Kevin
    I contacted the seller with exactly that request. I suspect they'll just refund me...and that would be fine too. In fact, the more I think of it the more I think returning it is a better option. I have always liked the pen 38 but part of what I like is that it's reasonably priced. The cost of the CLA is making it less attractive.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    I guess it all depends how much it cost you, and if it that was close to what one pays for one in pristine condition, then returning it makes sense.
    If you got it for a great deal (like under $50), then keep it and service it yourself. Most iris blades can be accessed from the front and rear once the front elements and the rear element group is removed. A set of $10 lens spanners is best.
    White gas (naptha) and cotton swaps will gently degrease the gummy oil. The naptha dries stain-free. Then you'll know you've gotten almost all the oil out.
    Ronson lighter fluid in a small can should provide enough naptha for a lifetime of cleaning.

    It's not difficult to do. Only the worst case stuck blades require total access and rebuild. I dared myself with one prime lens and it turned out pretty straight forward to do.
     
    • Informative Informative x 4
  8. dixeyk

    dixeyk TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jun 18, 2012
    Bellingham . WA
    Kevin
    I bought the lens for $125. Good for one in nice shape but not crazy cheap. I have cleaned other lenses and actually have most of the tools I would need. I'm reasonably sure I could do it myself. Gotta decide if it's worth it. Leaning toward not at the moment.

    i bought it on impulse. To be honest, my Konica 40 is a similarly nice lens (the Olympus is definitely sharper wide open) and might be a bit better overall. I certainly get a lot of images I like from that Konica.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2015
  9. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    Then you're in a strong position to determine if to keep or not, since you can do the cleaning. I would also return it since it's an impulse buy. Impulse buys shouldn't come with a helping of buyer's remorse.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. dixeyk

    dixeyk TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jun 18, 2012
    Bellingham . WA
    Kevin
    You are wise. ;)
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2015
  11. Mus Aziz

    Mus Aziz TalkEmount Top Veteran

    575
    Sep 3, 2015
    Mus
    Kevin,

    Where I'm from, a CLA of a manual focus lens does not normally exceed USD25.00 , but shipping cost to where I am aint worth it. :)
     
  12. dixeyk

    dixeyk TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jun 18, 2012
    Bellingham . WA
    Kevin
    LOL
     
  13. dixeyk

    dixeyk TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jun 18, 2012
    Bellingham . WA
    Kevin
    I think I'm going to keep the lens and have a go at cleaning it. It's a risk in that I have had a cleaning go terribly wrong in the past, but I have had more go really well and I have the tools. I'm feeling adventurous...and I hate returning stuff. I am going to ask for some money back given the seller didn't disclose it. Of course I am not holding my breath on that one.
     
  14. Deadbear77

    Deadbear77 TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Sep 14, 2012
    Northeast Ohio
    Kevin
    I bought a canon 85 1.8 fdn at a local camera store for 60.00 with oil on the blades. I've had it for two years and have had no problems. I thought the oil was only bad when using the lens on an original slr. Thought it stuck while shooting. Using our cameras (alpha, nex) with manually opening and closing the blades shouldn't be a problem.
     
  15. dixeyk

    dixeyk TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jun 18, 2012
    Bellingham . WA
    Kevin
    That has a occurred to me. Of course now I'm committed to trying to clean it. I think it's my stubborn streak courtesy of my dad. Like when you're out for a run and find yourself sitting at the bottom of that insanely steep hill. You COULD go around and it would be just fine but you know you've gotta do it. It's either you or the hill and you can't back down so up you go.
     
  16. dixeyk

    dixeyk TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jun 18, 2012
    Bellingham . WA
    Kevin
    Managed to clean the oil off without a problem...EXCEPT as I was putting the mount back on a heard the tiniest little "ping" sound and noticed that the little spring mechanism (the spring itself) broke. So now it's as clean as a whistle but the aperture doesn't work.

    SH*T
     
  17. Hawkman

    Hawkman TalkEmount Top Veteran

    943
    Sep 10, 2013
    Virginia, USA
    Steve
    Murphy!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  18. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
  19. dixeyk

    dixeyk TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jun 18, 2012
    Bellingham . WA
    Kevin
    On the plus side, the aperture blades are REALLY clean.
     
    • Funny Funny x 4
  20. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    D'oh!! How did it break? Can it be modified? If it's a little coil spring, maybe reform an end if that snapped off...or if at the middle, join them as two springs.