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Trying to adapt some old lenses

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by sam, Jun 6, 2016.

  1. sam

    sam TalkEmount Regular

    52
    Nov 23, 2015
    Ontario
    sam
    image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg


    New at this, but not afraid to try.

    Got two free oldies from a friend. Thought I might as well give it a go and teach myself something new.

    The lens from the Branette in the top two photos, any ideas about how to go about NEXifing it.
    The shutter needs to be disabled. The aperture blades work smoothly.

    The lens from the Wirgin, bottom two photos- any ideas about how to get the front(the lens on the right) optic open. Tried some DIY spanner wrenches- no luck.
    Want to clean the growth out of it, and hopefully it will be more useable. Well, right now it's not useable. The body functions but the lens needs work.
    Once that is done, I will attempt to NEXify it's expandable lens barrel.



    Thanks.
     
  2. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    First, forget about DIY spanners. I know some have luck with cheap vernier calipers, but a lens spanner off ebay is about $15 CAD, and will be your best friend as you go forward.
    Have a good set of screwdrivers, no skimping here. You'll need crosspoint, not Phillips.
    Run down to Canadian Tire and buy a can of acetone, a roll of top quality painter's masking tape, and the Dollar Store to pick up a 200-count box of cotton swabs. You will go through them quickly.
    The acetone is needed to dissolve the thread locker used in most lenses. Soak a swab in it and drip it into the threads. In a minute the rings will break free.

    The lens' front element appears to be put in place from the rear, as there are 2 holes for a spanner.
    Once extracted, be careful with older lenses as the coatings are soft. Cotton is pretty gentle on coatings, but don't rub too harshly.
    I've found a mixture of ammonia and isopropanol to be effective in removing almost everything off, including fungus. I follow up with a final cleaning with a dedicated lens cleaning solution that is non-alcohol...a de-ionized water based cleaner with a mild surfactant. This removes remnants of the ammonia and residue.
    The masking tape is to install the clean elements into place without getting finger prints on them. Make a loop of tape and stick it onto the front of the element. Place into body and peel. Good quality tape will leave no glue residue. Another use of it is during the extraction, used to lift out elements and keep them in order so that you'll know which direction they go back in.

    As for using them on a Sony, this gets into how good a DIYer you are. How equipped your man cave is, so to speak.
    But usually, folks fabricate adapters out of off the shelf M42/M39/C-mount adapters, and their respective extension tubes, and helicoid focusing tubes.
    All from ebay!
    You'll need to recreate the register length of the original camera for it to focus to infinity on the NEX.

    HTH! And good luck.

    PS. That looks to be a Cooke-Triplet design. There may be another element still in the camera at the rear.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2016
  3. sam

    sam TalkEmount Regular

    52
    Nov 23, 2015
    Ontario
    sam



    Thanks for the advice Will.

    What brand lens cleaning solution are you using?

    BTW, how did you know there was a Canadian Tire down the road from my house? lol
     
  4. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    Unfortunately, there isn't a brand on it, it's some generic lens cleaner I got from B and H.
    I spent three years in Montreal, so I know about Canadian Tire. :D