1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

The basics?

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by 82DMC12, Oct 16, 2015.

  1. 82DMC12

    82DMC12 New to TalkEmount

    6
    Oct 16, 2015
    Hi guys,

    I'm fairly new to higher-end cameras, first having an A5000 for about a year before upgrading to an A6000 last month.

    Lenses I currently own are the 16-50pz from my A5000, Sony 35F18, Sony 55210, and Sigma 19F28.

    I'm curious about adapted lenses (legacy lenses?). I see there are various adapters you can get to from E-mount to A-mount, or Canon, or Nikon, etc.

    I can easily go on B&H's website and see the E-mount lenses for sale, including Sony brand, Rokinon, Sigma, and a couple other Japanese brands.

    Are there any other brands that work natively with E-mount, even if the AF doesn't work? Or do you have to have an adapter for basically any brand that isn't available in the E-mount section on B&H?

    Also, when using an adapter, does that affect the 35mm equivalent ? For example, I know if I have the 19mm Sigma I take 1.5x that and get the 35mm equivalent. But if I get, say, a Nikon lens that is 18-55 in FF, does the adapter also change the total equivalency since the sensor is now further away from the lens?

    Hope my questions are clear.

    Thanks for the advice!
    Andy
     
  2. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Welcome 82DMC12! To answer your questions:

    1) There may be one or two exceptions I can't think of right now, but basically any lens that isn't listed as an E-mount lens at B&H will need an adapter.

    2) The adapter doesn't affect the "crop" value of a lens in any way. Any lens that you use with an adapter will still have that 1.5x total equivalency. For example, on your A6000 a 50mm lens will have the field of view of a 75mm lens, whether it's a Sony E-mount 50mm or a 50mm from any number of other manufacturers.
     
  3. 82DMC12

    82DMC12 New to TalkEmount

    6
    Oct 16, 2015
    Woodworks, thanks for the fast reply. So if I understand correctly, the thickness of the adapter does not affect the field of view? Is there any effect at all? Aside from whether or not it transfers AF, lens data, etc.

    What about F/ stop? Since the light is traveling further do you need a faster lens to get a similar exposure as a native lens of same FOV?

    I'm thinking about the Zeiss 1670 but it's quite expensive and not very fast. Maybe I should be looking at adapted lenses as long as I am totally clear on the basics.
     
  4. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    The thickness of the adapter makes the lens match the original sensor/film plane-to-lens mount distance that it would have on the original camera it was built for. That's why you have to buy different adapters for different brands of lenses. Mirrorless cameras have a much shorter mount register than a traditional DSLR. So the adapter merely restores the proper distance. It doesn't affect the field of view in any way.

    And it has no effect on the exposure (f-stop) either. A f/1.8 lens will let in all the light a f/1.8 lens will. Of course because the image is cropped on an APS-C camera, the total light reaching the sensor is less than on a FF sensor.

    But that opens up a huge can of equivalency worms, and I want no part of that! :laugh1:
     
  5. 82DMC12

    82DMC12 New to TalkEmount

    6
    Oct 16, 2015
    OK I think I understand now. I was under the assumption that the function of the adapter was to simply switch the attachment interface from E-mount to whatever. But if it also restores the proper distance, that makes sense too.

    Are there any "gotta have" adapted lenses? I'm good with my 55210 for long zooms. I'm really looking for a nice wide to medium zoom I can use as an every day lens. Basically the 1670 but faster and hopefully cheaper!
     
  6. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    I unloaded all my legacy lenses a while back, so I'll let the experts here take over on that question. As for a cheaper and faster 16-70 zoom, I know a guy who can get you a sweet deal on one. I hear he has a bridge over the East River for sale too! :rolleyes-20:
     
  7. 82DMC12

    82DMC12 New to TalkEmount

    6
    Oct 16, 2015
    LOL Guess it's easier to wish than to find! I'm thinking adapted lenses are more for people who started out with a different brand camera and don't want to take a bath on their lens collection? Not really for people who started out with nothing.
     
  8. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Nah, I think legacy lenses are for people who want the best lens possible without breaking the bank, and who are willing to focus manually, live without EXIF data, etc. But some adapted lenses are jewels, and people can get positively rhapsodic about them.
     
  9. 82DMC12

    82DMC12 New to TalkEmount

    6
    Oct 16, 2015
    Thanks for the explanation! Wish I knew what to look for, guess I'll keep reading the reviews on here! I'm in Kansas City and there isn't much here for camera stuff.
     
  10. RnR

    RnR TalkEmount Regular

    29
    Jul 23, 2013
    Brisbane, Australia
    Hasse
    Try looking for a Tamron SP 35-80mm - http://www.adaptall-2.org/lenses/01A.html - should be available on fleabay for < $100. Its hard to get wider and keep the quality up, your crop factor of 1.5 makes it hard to get good wide options. There is also a Vivitar Series 1 28-90mm for a bit wider, but the Series 1 lenses are fairly well known nowadays and it may be increasingly harder to get a decent copy for little money. Ofcause your neck of the woods may have nice swap meets, bric-a-brac markets and charity shops where such items can be found in abundance for $5 a pop :D
     
  11. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Legacy lenses are a fun wormhole to explore, looks like David got you pretty well set up.

    There are $10.00 lenses that are pretty good, some that are just plain junk. Then the price escalates from there. I have found plenty in the $40-60.00 range that are fantastic. Like anything you shop second-hand prices and conditions vary wildly.

    Amazon and Ebay are fantastic resources, with thousands available. I have bought and resold about 25 different lenses, finally settling on 3. Also, keep an eye on the For Sale Section on this very site.

    As far as zooms go, the 35-70mm Minolta tends to get rave reviews, as well as the 50mm 1.4
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2015
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. SpaceManSpiff

    SpaceManSpiff TalkEmount Top Veteran

    547
    Dec 13, 2013
    Tucson, AZ
    Eric
    Hi Andy,
    You have received some great replies here. I bought my NEX-6 largely because of how Sony implemented their manual focusing aids. I think that there are many different reasons that people use legacy glass --less expensive than their modern equivalents, a lens with a specification that is not in the e-mount line-up, retro-cool, nostalgia, they inherited a box of camera gear from a loved one, or in my case I love the tactile experience of using a well-built manual lens. While the modern AF lenses are often technically superior and I enjoy the results I get from them, I greatly prefer the picture taking experience with my legacy glass.

    Generally, the modern lenses have a cleaner (more clinical?) look while the legacy lenses often have 'character'--optical imperfections that give the image a certain aesthetic. At wide open apertures, the modern lenses I have outperform my legacy glass; however stepped down there can be very little (if any) difference in performance.

    Prices are based on a IMO strange mix of performance, reputation, rarity, and to a lesser extent ease of adaptability to other camera systems.

    If you are legacy-curious you could start with a 'nifty-fifty'. It is a focal length you don't have with a large aperture, and they were the standard (and most common) lens that cameras came with. They can be found on most 70s cameras, perform well and are inexpensive.

    HTH,
    Eric
     
  13. rdfisch

    rdfisch TalkEmount Regular

    181
    Nov 13, 2013
    Northern NJ
    Rick
    Totally agree on the Minolta MD 35-70. I've tried at least a dozen adapted lenses, but have sold them all except for this one. Mine is the "macro" version and definitely a keeper. Other than that I've saved my pennies and sprung for native primes I've been very happy with. Back to zooms, the native 55210 can be found used for around $200 and although slow and certainly not superb, is a good value. The other "better" native zooms I've bought (i.e. not the kit zooms) are OK, but IMO are overpriced for the IQ.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2015