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Telephoto Lenses that aren't push-pull?

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by Synomis192, Jul 14, 2013.

  1. Synomis192

    Synomis192 TalkEmount Regular

    141
    May 26, 2013
    I'm considering getting a telephoto lens, but for what I've seen most lega-teles are actually push-pull designs. I don't have any experience with push pulls, but I'd rather play it safe and get one that has a rotating zoom design.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    I too am not a fan of the push-pull design.

    There are plenty that are rotating, just gotta look closely. I currently have two, but have had a few others as well along the way.
     
  3. Synomis192

    Synomis192 TalkEmount Regular

    141
    May 26, 2013
    Which two do you have and are they decent performers?
     
  4. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    An Olympus OM 75-150/4 is a two-ring zoom with very good performance. The Minolta 75-150/4 is a push-pull zoom with excellent handling: the zoom is fairly stiff and focus has less resistance, so focussing after zooming is easy without changing the zoom position. In general handling of a push-pull differs very much from lens to lens, and sometimes even from sample to sample.
     
  5. rtex42

    rtex42 TalkEmount Regular

    68
    Jun 14, 2013
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Rick
    I have Olympus 85-250 zoom that is not push-pull.
    Excellent lens but a bit hard to find.
    Probably would be in the $250 price range.
     
  6. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
  7. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    Sorry to disturb but what is the push pull design?
    Alex
     
  8. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    It's a zoom lens that has one ring that is used for focussing by turning it and for zooming by push/pull action. Here's an example of such a zoom lens, the well-known Minolta MD 70-210mm 1:4.

    20110721-001-L.
     
  9. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    I thought that this is the only technology to make manual zoom lenses or not?
    Regards
    A
     
  10. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Here's an example of a two-ring zoom, featuring separate rings for zooming and focussing, the Minolta MD Zoom-Rokkor 35-70mm 1:3.5.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    My sel 1855 is of the last category right?
     
  12. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
  13. Synomis192

    Synomis192 TalkEmount Regular

    141
    May 26, 2013
     
  14. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    Its probably the best MD zoom lens as far as performance goes, lightweight (365g) and relatively small (68mm) and my personal opinion is that it balances well on the Nex body, but I'll let Ad say the rest ;)
     
  15. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    OK, can't not answer now, can I? :). There isn't much to add to what Nick says. If you go after one, find the latest MD version as shown below, not the Rokkor version shown earlier. The latest model is better, has a macro mode and is much easier to find; it was quite popular in its days.

    20110720-074-L.
     
  16. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    I actually recommend the push/pull mechanism. I find it more intuitive and faster to use than the separate rings. For instance it's a lot easier to track moving subjects with them. A slight twist will adjust both focus and zoom. Unbeatable.

    If size worries you, I came across a manual Tokina 70-210, which is small, light and telescopic. It is sharp and has good contrast. Of course, it doesn't beat the Minolta MD 70-210, but few lenses do, and the Tokina is a lot more portable.
     
  17. FoodRep

    FoodRep New to TalkEmount

    3
    Jul 20, 2013
    Would you mind expanding on that-- I'm looking for a legacy zoom and weighing them against the sel55210.
     
  18. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Having both I thought I'd chime in. In my experience they are completely different beasts. The Sony SEL-55210 is all about convenience: autofocus, OIS, relatively light-weight. It's image quality is quite decent too, but the corners and edges are not very sharp. I use this one for family snaps (including our dog) and I will take it when on an outing with others because it allows me to quickly take a shot. As with all Sony lenses, take care you buy one with a shop with a liberal return policy, Sony delivers more duds than they should.

    The Minolta MD Zoom 70-210mm 1:4 is a large beast and it's heavy, 635g. Its image quality is quite decent too, although it's not perfect in the corners. I have tried to use it repeatedly because of the favorable reports of others, but I don't like it: too heavy and not good enough for landscape pictures and too inconvenient for family snaps. Even with peaking on I find it difficult to focus at 210mm because of the viewfinder image jumping up and down. Oddly, image quality is at its best at 210mm, gradually decreasing to 70mm where my sample isn't razor sharp, just a bit woolly. Stop it down to at least f/5.6 or rather to f/8 if possible.
     
  19. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    The MD 70-210 is indeed a large lens as Ad says. With the adapter even larger. But what you get is in my opinion a superb lens with beautiful, saturated warm colours and great contrast. It is also very sharp. Mind you I have a mint copy that probably never had been used before I bought it (cheaply). It is also perfect for macro photography (1:4) with a superbly smooth bokeh.

    The downside is the size of course, so it's not a casual lens, it's for dedicated photography sessions. That's where the Tokina comes in. It's small enough to carry in your bag, just in case you should need a tele shot.

    This is the one: FS: Tokina 70-210 zoom K-A mount - PentaxForums.com
     
  20. FoodRep

    FoodRep New to TalkEmount

    3
    Jul 20, 2013
    Any thoughts on the Tamron 80-210 3.8-4 (103A) vs either of these?