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Taking first pictures tomorrow

Discussion in 'Welcomes and Introductions' started by alaios, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    Dear all,
    the big time came. Tomorrow I will be shooting (for the very first time) my wife at her concert.

    I will need some help to optimize my performance, that would mean mostly using not-that bad settings and me taking mostly care for the framing (no time to practice in the art of manual focusing and manual modes)

    My hardware is nex-f3 with the 1855 lenses. No external flash or tripod (they have not be delivered yet).

    I will try to position my self quite close to the stage so the 55 is ok for a bit of portraits
    I am thinking for the following settings in the camera

    1. Turn off the sound when taking a picture so I do not disturb others and I can make a lot of pictures
    2. Capture both Raw & Jpeg at 4:3 format at higher quality (I will open in the next days a discussion between raw and jpeg but since then is safer to have both)
    3. Try to set the camera in portrait mode so I can get a bit of defocusing (how I can get rid of decofusing for some portraits)
    4. Use also that setting, how is it called, that when it finds portrait makes also an automatic framing
    5. Try also few pictures with the super, duper , hyper auto mode the camera it has (I slightly changed the name)
    6. Try continuous shooting so to have a lot of pictures and being able to select later probably few good shots.
    7. What about soft skin effect?

    Please feel free to comment/argue/correct

    Regards
    Alex
     
  2. gio

    gio TalkEmount Veteran

    382
    Sep 12, 2012
    Manchester, uk
    don't forget to turn of the focus assist too, or you'll be flashing a red light in their faces
     
  3. Dioptrick

    Dioptrick TalkEmount All-Pro

    Feb 4, 2012
    New Zealand
    There is no right way or wrong way of doing this. Being so new to photography, my advice for you is to try to relax a little. If your photos turn out well, that's good. If not, then that's good too - because this is part of learning. What I'm trying to say is - do your best, but don't stress about the possibility of making mistakes.

    That aside, yes turning off the sound is a good idea.
    Concentrate on composition and capturing the right moments, let the camera worry about the rest... maybe just leave it on Intelligent Auto and forget about it.
    Continuous shooting needs discipline and can be easily over used. Not sure if this is a good idea because even on silent, the shutter makes a sound and continuous shooting might cause a distraction to those around you.
    Special effects (like skin tone) is up to you. Personally I don't use them because I want to get a pure original. If effects are needed, I do them later on the computer.

    If possible, do a few test shots before the concert begins to boost your confidence. Take photos during dress rehearsal (if you are permitted) or any person that is on the stage, then preview them on your screen - just to make sure that the settings you have decided to use are working well under the stage lighting conditions. If not find and test another Mode that does.

    Just snap away and enjoy yourself! :)

    ... and oh, don't forget to also get a few wide-angle shots that include the audience and the 'atmosphere' of the event. Having only close up photos of your wife on stage is great, but without photos to remind you of the atmosphere the context would be lost.
     
  4. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    Thanks for the tips! Great! I will try both and I hope will bring something nice :)
    Is there a way to reduce shutter noise? I find it quite noisy for this type of concerts.

    Alex
     
  5. Dioptrick

    Dioptrick TalkEmount All-Pro

    Feb 4, 2012
    New Zealand
    Not that I know of...

    Maybe shoot only when there is enough sound in the theatre and avoid taking a photo during dead silence?
     
  6. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    The shutter is a bit quieter than previous models, but still noisy. Also make sure your screen brightness is turned down.

    Have fun and let us know your experience.
     
  7. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    Thanks for the tips! Great! I will try both and I hope will bring something nice :)
    Is there a way to reduce shutter noise? I find it quite noisy for this type of concerts.

    Alex
     
  8. Grisu_HDH

    Grisu_HDH TalkEmount Veteran

    397
    Dec 16, 2012
    Southern Germany
    Markus
    AsSaid before would not use continues shooting due to the shutter sound.
    And if using a tripod don't forget to switch off image stabilisation (OOS)!
     
  9. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    Hi,
    I am back with photos!! how to share my experience ?? Places that I can start uploading my "work"?
    Alex
     
  10. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    Photobucket, Flickr... even Facebook would do ;)

    Let's see them!!! :)
     
  11. Orange

    Orange TalkEmount Veteran

    203
    Jan 4, 2013
    England
    It's not Orange!
    Well done hope you had fun! I use photobucket :)
     
  12. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    I am bit tired (working 14 hours almost) and I will just stay for first day questions but I promise to be back with the photos

    1. I was sitting on the third row and I think I was like 10 meters away from the focus area. I wanted to try portraits but I was capturing full bodies. How do you "calculate" the zoom you need?

    2. I found autofocus bad, losing fast the focus

    3. I tried also manual focus, and with the camera's help was quite easy to focus fast where I wanted. The question though is when I want to focus on a face on the very left side of the image and use manual focus I get zoomed the center of the camera. I can of course move the camera slightly to left to the portrait to get the focus, but then I need to move back the camera to center so to put my "context" to the left side of the screen. Does not that lead to a bad focus ?

    4. In reality if I am focusing so fast and good with the manual focusing the auto focus is not needed anymore.

    5. How to upload the pictures with the current settings used. I want to discuss a bit on those, with the given samples

    Regards
     
  13. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Nooooooooo! Not Facebook!!! It'll be a cold day in hell before I turn over my personal information to Mark Zuckerberg and his gang of data miners.

    Ahem... Sorry for the outburst... Personal peeve of mine...

    Carry on. Please. :rolleyes:
     
  14. Dioptrick

    Dioptrick TalkEmount All-Pro

    Feb 4, 2012
    New Zealand
    1. Knowing how much zoom you need can only come from experience.
    2. NEX auto focus uses contrast detection. If contrast is poor (such as in low light or objects with similar shades) AF will struggle.
    3. You must keep the shutter half depressed when you move back to your original composition to maintain the focus you have acquired. I do this all the time.
    4. Which is why many of us like to use vintage manual focus lenses. The Sony AF lenses are still good for most applications.
    5. You can use this forum's server. Go to your profile, create an album, upload photos... but you must save the photos into your album after they have been uploaded or the upload manager will delete them. Go to your album, select a photo, copy the BB Code, and paste the code on your thread.
     
  15. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    3. Yes but still do not you loose the sharpness of the focus as you have to move the camera slightly from the left side to the right?
    6. What is DMF? I found that there is AF,MF and DMF.
    7. I am getting "scared" on going on to manual mode focusing. I want to capture wife on a concert and be able easier to make closeups and I am afraid that with manual focus I might be doing something "wrong" giving photos of bad quality.
     
  16. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    I had the same "fear" for MF before I tried it couple of months ago :D
    It was the people here that pursuade me to try it and a fast MF legacy lens and after that I don't think I'm ever going back to AF for my type of shooting ;)


    Yeah, but with Manual Focus (once you practise a bit) you can nail focus better/easier and have a much "better"/in focus photo in the end
    Plus, the Focus Peaking and MF assist functions on the Nex, make nailing focus so easy and a joy ;)
     
  17. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Alex, really, you need to relax a bit. This is photography, not brain surgery. :D

    You have the camera, get it out and play with it. That's the best way to learn. After you try things out and are having difficulty with something specific then we can help you out. ;)
     
  18. Orange

    Orange TalkEmount Veteran

    203
    Jan 4, 2013
    England
    It's not Orange!
    Well said. He's right Alex, just relax and fall into it. That's easy for me to say, I know, but the more you use/practice with your equipment, the more comfortable you will be with it.
    I consider myself no stranger to technology and gadgets. I came from an "enthusiast" model DSLR, but even so I am finding the NEX (6) menu's bewlidering & difficult and very hard to remember where what it is that I am looking for! There's little logic to it all. But the more I use it, then like anything else, the more I become accustomed to it. If there's a particular type of photography that you wish to shoot, then practice beforehand. I know this was difficult for you in this case, if I recall correctly you'd not had the camera long before this concert.

    But the more you use it, the more confident you will be. Please don't let this post of mine put you off from asking questions, that's how we learn, but equally don't be afraid to change a setting, try it, see what difference it makes! I'm still making a load of mistakes as my NEX is very different and very new to me, I keep forgetting to change back ISO, WB, all that kind of stuff, so you're not alone my friend! Anyway I look forward to seeing your results once you post them up.

    As for DMF, it means the camera will AF for you, but you then have the option to "fine-tune" the focus manually.
    And as for the focus question you asked above (about moving to left/right) it won't really affect the focus if the two points (subjects) are the same distance away from you. But this is a good thing to try for yourself just at home.

    I hope all this helps buddy, keep practising, get used to your camera & lenses & before you know it, you'll be taking better photos than you ever though possible! ;):D:cool:
     
  19. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    Thanks a lot everyone for the nice discussion.

    There is something still I do not understand with the e mount lenses. There is a ring at the front which helps you focus manually. In the other lenses this is slightly different with numbers printed there. Can someone explain me that difference?
    Alex
     
  20. Grisu_HDH

    Grisu_HDH TalkEmount Veteran

    397
    Dec 16, 2012
    Southern Germany
    Markus
    On the E-mounts you find a scala for the focal length if using zoom (like the 18-55) and nothing when using prime lenses (like the Sigma 30).
    All E-Mounts with AF have a ring to use manual focus (which has no numbers printed on it), but you have to set you camera to MF or DMF in the settings menu. Try this as a first step to MF.

    On manual (new and legacy) lenses you have one ring for aperture setting (e.g. a scala from f 1.4 to 22) and another ring used for zooming/focusing (e.g. a scala from 0,3m to oo=endless).
    The printed numbers on the manual lenses should make it easier to preset distance before focusing, but normally the AF lenses are not meant to use as permanent MF lenses that's why there are no numbers on them.

    That's what you meant I think??