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Street Photography Threatened

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by davect01, Jun 25, 2015.

  1. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    • Informative Informative x 3
  2. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Thanks, signed the petition. On the rare occasions I attempted something like street photography or even just photographing buildings where people happened to be in front of them, I usually get at least one comment per outing from someone who doesn't like their possible appearance in a picture and questions my right to do so.

    These days I simply avoid having people in pics as much as possible to avoid the fuss and more and more I limit myself to nature photography where there aren't that many people around.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave

    It is a tricky proposition itself. Some don't care, some really get annoyed.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. tomO2013

    tomO2013 TalkEmount Veteran

    375
    Dec 11, 2014
    I feel that this is a huge tragedy and a travesty for generations to come.
    In most cases when people say no to street photography it's reactionary - a fear based consequence of all the scandals in the newspapers in recent years (sexual scandals, child abuse scandals, invasion of privacy, the ease of which something can be shared to facebook and tagged maliciously). Heck even the modern paparazzi aggressively taking pictures of celebrities picking the noses have a lot to answer for. It really is hard to have a 50mm mounted to your camera and not get dirty looks from the general public these days.
    I've found certain cities and cultures tend to be more understanding of street photography as an art form more than another.

    Ironically street photography as an art form tends to increase in value over time as peoples fashions and way of life change. Much more so I've found than any other form of photography that doesn't have human interaction. I worry that denying street art photography as an art form and taking a hyper sensitive denial to it, the EU is depriving future generation of the same wonder and awe that we get when we look at an old silver halide print from our grandparents era.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave

    Just don't ever go to a park without a kid and take pictures. ;-) You get some really odd looks.

    It will be interesting to see what the current generation, (today's kids), will think ad they are used to taking and posting pictures all day long.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    I think this paranoia and fear mongering will pass as this middle-aged generation gets older, and the selfie-loving digital generation comes of age.
    It is pure nonsense, that anyone with a camera and big lens, must be up to no good. After all, who needs such a lens when your iphone will do. You must be a pervert or pedophile. :p And in NYC in recent years, you must be a terrorist. The bias seems to be continuing.

    As they say, those who object the loudest are actually the most guilty of what they accuse and suspect others of perpetrating.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. pbizarro

    pbizarro TalkEmount Veteran

    358
    Nov 24, 2014
    Portugal
    I signed it too. But please, stop confusing the rights of people with the rights of the buildings, so to speak... This is quite simple: whenever I want to take a picture of someone on the street, I do not look like I am hiding or trying to do something on the hush-hush. I act open about it, I do not act like I want to be in disguise or something...

    If someone notices and is displeased, and comes to me, I engage in polite conversation, and explain why I took the picture. Quite often, it clears things. But I understand that someone may not want to have his/her picture taken. It's just common courtesy.

    Different things with modern buildings, even though I can sympathize to a certain extent. If I take a picture of the London Eye for commercial purposes, I need to have a release form, same thing as if I am working with a person for commercial purposes. If it is for editorial or personal use, then such a release or consent should not be required.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  8. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Not so sure about this issue passing. Almost always it's the younger people who take issue at me photographing them, older people generally don't care or say something like "Do I look good on the picture" while smiling.