Step by Step guide to Servicing a Canon FD 35mm F2 Chrome Nose

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by Mathieu Decodts, Dec 21, 2013.

  1. Mathieu Decodts

    Mathieu Decodts TalkEmount Veteran

    282
    Aug 5, 2013
    Hi guys,

    Been reading around the internet on how to get into old canon lenses and surprised to see there is not much out there. Being the curious type I have experimented and taught myself how to service old manual lenses over the last few months and have built up a tool kit, so wanted to share here.

    So far I have fixed stuck aperture blades, stiff focusing ring mechanisms and mild to extremely bad fungus.

    I have also cleaned a lot of old external lens elements to bring the lens up to very good almost like new condition in some cases and thought I should share my new found knowledge here.

    So without further ado, this is my opening and service guide to my new and current favourite canon fd chrome nose, the 35mm F2

    First off you can go in the front or the back of any lens, if there is a problem with the aperture then you generally need to go in the back, which is normally much more complex. For the first of these guides I dealt with lens fungus and the best way to get at all the lens elements without making a lot of work for yourself is through the front.

    To begin you need to get the ring around the front of the lens off, the one that has all the canon writing about the lens type. I have tried many different tools but my cheap and easy recommendation is this:

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472158164/player/ed0c3f89cb" height="934" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    Yes a plain and simple bath plug, ideally order one a little smaller than your filter ring size, but I would buy a multi pack of different sized rubber sink plugs to be sure.

    then simply put the plug on the lens and push down while rotating counter clockwise

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472137205/player/8e0cc116f6" height="1024" width="959" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    They are threaded very very fine so it will take a while and sometimes they are dirty and might require a little lubricant (wd40 or similar) on the inside of the filter thread, but persevere until you have this

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472148454/player/e88ce79387" height="996" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    everything gets simpler from here, you can now see what you are doing going forward

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472265103/player/f904b4e4e5" height="1022" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    you need a lens tool like so

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472019605/player/faf7e3a15f" height="682" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    I got mine from ebay from hong kong for about 12 pounds

    I have heard about people using scissors and callipers but you risk scratching lens elements and I wouldn't try that unless you don't care about ruining the lens and are just gaining experience.


    So you adjust the lens tool until you can put the dual screwdriver bits into the notches on either size of the lens element in what I will call a lens fixing ring (no idea of real names)

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472133524/player/6b330aaedf" height="1024" width="674" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    These can be very tight too, and require quite a bit of force to start them, especially on older lenses.

    I would recommend holding the tool in place with one hand and rotating the lens itself once you are over the initial sitcky-ness.

    Once down two parts will come loose, the chrome ring and the lense fixing ring
    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472120034/player/8cf82b3250" height="919" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    now this might seem crazy but the parts are made from exceptional metal so go ahead and give them a wash in the sink with a nail brush and some fairy liquid. My 35mm was in terrible condition but is sparkling clean like new now. Remember these parts don't touch the lens, only peoples hands and the outside environment. But be sure to dry them all well though.

    This is what you can now see when you look into the top of the lens

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472196386/player/312f18e9df" height="946" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    The three tiny screws around the outside are next, they hold the focusing body part, just remove them, keep them safe with a magnet and again you can give this part a good clean in the sink (it is made of very robust metal and rubber too)

    I find this is the dirtiest part of any lens, it has the most contact with human hands

    you will end up now seeing the real guts of the lens construction and it is made of brass and quite beautiful!

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472095615/player/861539be1e" height="538" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    If you have problems with infinity focus you can take the little fixing off the side of the barrel, show here, and move it to the right to extend focus out towards infinity or left to bring in back towards near focus. There are a number of screw holes for exactly this purpose. If you have no focus problems leave this alone.




    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472226723/player/c8b61016af" height="1024" width="873" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>
    Now to get into the guts of the lens elements you need to remove another lens fixing ring, this time a brass one, again adjust the lens tool to fit and screw counter clockwise

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472169426/player/7e82dd22e2" height="1024" width="662" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    once done you will end up with this, again give it a clean if you like, maybe with some brasso? (I didnt have any to hand!)

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472078964/player/400336eec2" height="978" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    Carefully turn the lens over and this will just fall out, the whole lens assembly. I got a little surprise, someone had serviced it in the past and left their mark! HK+?

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472202933/player/8609d65dc0" height="1024" width="1010" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    This is actually made of two parts you can unscrew by hand. Hold the brass part and unscrew counter clockwise the black part you will end up with this

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472067624/player/2c0c160784" height="1011" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    and what looks like a jewellers loop.

    You can then remove the top thorium element with the pointy end of the lens tool, again rotating counter clockwise

    you can clearly identify it from the tint.

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472026225/player/42fca3e3d8" height="949" width="1011" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    what is left in the back of the lens body is the aperture mechanism, but I wouldn't recommend tinkering with it from this side.

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472036605/player/012afce586" height="943" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    You can actually go straight into the back, using the tool, shown here

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472126256/player/62a9cb12d1" height="1024" width="952" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    but if you want to clean all the lens elements you need to go in the front

    You can clean all the elements with what ever you like, I would recommend a mixture of rubbing alcohol and HG mould spray (or bleach) about 1 part bleach to 20-30 parts alcohol. If you are dealing with mould throw away your cleaning cloths when done.

    You obviously need some little screw drivers and a magnet is very helpful but the most useful tool I would recommend is this!

    <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mathieu_decodts_photography/11472141133/player/cfe9c7d123" height="809" width="1024" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>

    A head torch, absolutely essential in my mind, some parts require two hands and are deep in the barrel so a light source that moves with your point of view is essential!

    I have serviced about 10 lenses of various builds and saved hundreds of pounds on legacy lenses on ebay when buying ones with stuck apertures and fungus. this lens cost me 75 pounds but is now in 200+ pound condition and shoots like a dream!

    Hope you all enjoyed this guide, if folks are interested I can do some more. :D
     
    • Like Like x 8
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1
  2. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    A very informative thread and very unselfish of you to share it as you did.
    I may never do what you've done but your tutorial has certainly removed the mystique of how my Canon FD lenses are constructed.

    A very hearty Thank you !!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Jefenator

    Jefenator TalkEmount Top Veteran

    876
    Nov 23, 2012
    Oregon, USA
    Jeff
    Thanks for sharing! Wish this had been out there last year! ;)