Sony 28-70mm vs 28mm f/2 - Trying to decide?

Discussion in 'Sony Alpha E-Mount Lenses' started by JonathanF2, Jan 31, 2018.

Sony 28-70mm or 28mm f/2.0?

Poll closed Feb 8, 2018.
  1. Sony 28mm f2.0 FE

    10 vote(s)
    100.0%
  2. Sony 28-70mm FE

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. JonathanF2

    JonathanF2 TalkEmount Top Veteran

    501
    Aug 16, 2014
    Los Angeles, USA
    I mainly use adapted lenses, but I want to keep one native lens mainly for using my flash so I can use all the PASM settings on the mode dial. I recently acquired a Sony 28mm f2 FE lens, and while it's alright, I find my Nikon 28mm 2.8 AI-S lens to be optically better. So I'm debating whether or not I should keep it or go for the Sony kit zoom instead? I like how the 28mm f2 is compact and I know the 28-70mm is a bit more bulkier and has a flimsier build. From most reports the 28-70mm seems decent across the focal range and I can acquire one cheaper.

    If you could pick one lens solely for flash and general usage which would you pick? Thanks for any opinions!
     
  2. AlwaysOnAuto

    AlwaysOnAuto TalkEmount All-Pro

    Feb 17, 2015
    I already voted with my pocket book on this one Jonathan, FE2/28 is sitting on my shelf waiting to go back on the Nex-7 after this morning's outing.
     
  3. bdbits

    bdbits TalkEmount All-Pro

    Sep 10, 2015
    Bob
    I voted for the prime, but I am a prime kind of shooter and use a 35/1.8 for family gatherings and such. The kit lens is not terrible in my eyes given it is a kit lens, so if you would rather have a zoom it is a viable choice.

    I've been thinking of selling mine as a move to simplify my kit. I have hardly ever used it. If you decide you want one, shoot me a price and I'd consider selling it to you. Seriously, no pressure, but let me know if you are interested.
     
  4. runnerpsu

    runnerpsu TalkEmount Veteran

    262
    Feb 12, 2016
    South Florida
    When I purchased my A 7 II I planned to purchase three lenses for it. To-date, I've purchased the 55 1.8 followed by the 28. I'm happy with both. I like primes and my budget was a factor as well.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. unlo

    unlo Sony ******

    Jan 19, 2014
    Ohio
    Matt
    I use my prime with flash quite a bit, especially this past holiday season. I've never used the zoom so I can't speak on its performance.
     
  6. WestOkid

    WestOkid TalkEmount All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Jan 25, 2014
    New Jersey, USA
    Gary
    I've "had" both. The 28-70 is pretty decent, but unless you feel you may use focal lengths beyond 28mm, it loses out to the prime in performance, size, weight, and speed (aperture) by a lot.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. JonathanF2

    JonathanF2 TalkEmount Top Veteran

    501
    Aug 16, 2014
    Los Angeles, USA
    I was just thinking the way my A7II is partial to faster lenses in low light, I guess I'm starting to lean in keeping the 28mm f2. I don't really need the other focal lengths for flash work. One thing I noticed is when I use the outer focus areas with the 28mm f2, my AF doesn't seem quite precise, but if I use the center AF and then recompose, shots see sharper. I'm not sure if it's the lens or my camera? Can other owners of the 28mm f2 chime in if their lens reacts similarly? Thanks!
     
  8. WestOkid

    WestOkid TalkEmount All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Jan 25, 2014
    New Jersey, USA
    Gary
    It's the camera. Below illustrates the A7II focus coverage across the sensor. You lose PDAF once you leave the center. You lose everything close to the edge.
    Sony-A7II-Focus-Points.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  9. JonathanF2

    JonathanF2 TalkEmount Top Veteran

    501
    Aug 16, 2014
    Los Angeles, USA
    So why would I have more precise focus using 'center' focus and recomposing? Is the outer CDAF just not very precise for wider lenses? I tried using the 85mm 1.8 FE and had no issues using 'Flexible Spot' focus with the AF points outside the PDAF coverage area.
     
  10. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    I love my 28-70mm FE on my A6000, but the 28mm f2 has a clear advantage with the f2.

    Your choice greatly depends on if you want the much better f stop or the zoom range.
     
  11. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur Subscribing Member

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    I think it's a question of speed, not precision. AF is faster in continuous mode with PDAF, but CDAF is at least as accurate.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  12. tino84

    tino84 TalkEmount Regular

    52
    Feb 20, 2014
    Sorry but...it’s up to you and your shooting. :p

    Kit lens is slower but it’s a zoom, if you can use it on good lightning and with a flash, could be very handy.

    28 f2 is faster and lighter, and if you’re used to primes, it’s a good alternative to your nikon, as it has AF. And obviously, another advantage is you have it yet :p personally, I like it as it is small, light and has a good yeld.

    You could also consider to try and buy ( if there are stores allowing that near you ). Or as it getting cheap, you can buy the 28-70, try it and if you don’t like it, sell it for about the same price
     
  13. WestOkid

    WestOkid TalkEmount All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Jan 25, 2014
    New Jersey, USA
    Gary
    correct. So when you use center and recompose, you use hybrid AF. The PDAF will quickly lock in on the distance of the target and then use CDAF for precision focus, for the best of both worlds. When you use the CDAF only section, it will likely hunt unless lighting conditions are perfect. You will also get more false positives. This is why the CDAF only A7r was frustrating to people.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  14. JonathanF2

    JonathanF2 TalkEmount Top Veteran

    501
    Aug 16, 2014
    Los Angeles, USA
    What's weird though is that I used the 28mm f2 in good light using S-AF and it was still slightly soft in the CDAF focus area. Is Sony CDAF that bad? Using center focus and then recomposing seemed to work much better with the 28mm f2.
     
  15. JonathanF2

    JonathanF2 TalkEmount Top Veteran

    501
    Aug 16, 2014
    Los Angeles, USA
    I'm leaning towards keeping it since I got used in like-new condition for a very good price. My only other options within a similar price range is the 28-70mm and Sam/Rok 35mm 2.8 FE. My only issue is that I don't like having overlap in my kit, I'm pretty OCD that way! Lol
     
  16. Hawkman

    Hawkman TalkEmount All-Pro

    Sep 10, 2013
    Virginia, USA
    Steve
    Just my two cents worth.... When I picked up my A7ii at the end of last summer, I did so in the kit package, getting the 28-70/3.5-5.6 kit zoom in the process, and for only about US$150-200 more than the body alone. I did that consciously in order to start my FE lens collection with a useable standard zoom covering a decent (though not perfect) range of focal lengths - i.e., the purpose of most kit zooms - and not bust the budget in the process. I knew going in that it would likely be too "slow" aperture-wise for much of my needs beyond basic point-and-shoot and travel situations, and that it would not likely yield stellar sharpness across the frame at all or most focal lengths. Although I actually don't use it much, preferring either the FE 16-35/4 ZA for wider views, or 50/1.8 for tighter and faster situations (though not fast as in focal speed... that 50/1.8 sure can hunt at times), I have found it generally useful in a variety of situations and mostly "sharp enough" for what I use it for. It seems to be pretty good for video as well.

    That said, if my budget allows any time soon, I am closely eyeing either the the FE 28/2 for low-light wide angle situations or the FE 85/1.8 for tighter low-light situations (like close-ups of pets... and people). I'd also love to have the new FE 24-105/4 G, but that is WAY above my budget for the time being. The reviews on that 24-105 have been good so far, so if you are looking for a standard-and-then-some zoom and can stretch your budget for that one, I think it'd probably be worth it given the focal length range, the constant f/4 and the step-up IQ of a G lens. Just ask @WoodWorks@WoodWorks... I think he has one now.
     
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  17. tino84

    tino84 TalkEmount Regular

    52
    Feb 20, 2014
    Samyang 35 2.8 AF is a very good lens for the price, small and light and good af. It’s fast enough to be used with a flash, and fov maybe it s a little bit easier for general shooting than a 28 ( it depends on you obviously ). I like it, my copy will come back for may/June
     
  18. JonathanF2

    JonathanF2 TalkEmount Top Veteran

    501
    Aug 16, 2014
    Los Angeles, USA
    I'm kicking myself for not buying during the holiday sale prices. I just can't get myself to pay full price knowing they dropped by $50 or so! :D
     
  19. JonathanF2

    JonathanF2 TalkEmount Top Veteran

    501
    Aug 16, 2014
    Los Angeles, USA
    It's finally happened, I've decided to go with the 85mm 1.8 FE lens and start selling off some of my Nikon glass! I'll pair it with the 28mm f/2 and see how it goes from there. I've realized I've been shooting my Sony bodies for portrait work much more now, mainly due to the better AF accuracy with fast primes. Nikon FF still does better with high ISO and I actually prefer Nikon post processing, but having so many awesome lenses at my disposal, it gets addicting with the Sony! I have everything from M mount glass, Nikon AF and MF lenses, Sony native FE and everything in-between!
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2018
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  20. Hamsong

    Hamsong TalkEmount Regular

    39
    Sep 20, 2017
    Minneapolis, MN
    This is the nature of CDAF. In theory, it is more accurate and doesn't require calibration, but it needs CONTRAST, which can be in short supply, especially in low light. I shot Fuji for 4 years and it was ALL CDAF until I got the X-Pro2. Immediately, the faster nature of PDAF in low light became apparent. CDAF is similarly problematic on all mirrorless cameras, including Olympus, though Olympus seemed slightly quicker to decide on focus. The thing you'll find with CDAF is that sometimes it will grab the background instead of your desired AF point because the background might have more contrast. This is easy to tell with the 55, 85, etc, but much harder to see in the viewfinder with lenses wider than 35.

    PS Jonathan: the Sony 85 f1.8 is an amazing lens and a true bargain at that price. It's Zeiss Batis performance at 1/2 the cost, it's smaller and it has the bonus of the AF button on the side that can be assigned to Eye AF.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2