Some real world high ISO shoots with A7RII

Discussion in 'Sony Alpha E-Mount Cameras' started by dmward, Aug 19, 2015.

  1. dmward

    dmward TalkEmount Veteran

    200
    Mar 21, 2015
    Metro Chicago
    David
    I did these while we were playing bridge this afternoon.
    We were near large windows so the shutter speed is high, but the back of the room is dark.

    A7R2 with set to Av, center weighted metering, and the ISO was set to 6400, 12800 and 25600.

    First 6400. No Lightroom adjustments.

    20150819DSC01028.

    Then 12800

    20150819DSC01032.

    and 25600
    20150819DSC01040.

    The fact that the camera set high shutter speed because of luminance doesn't distract from the high ISO performance.
     
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  2. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Aug 6, 2011
    25,600 is ridiculously good on this camera.
     
  3. robbie36

    robbie36 TalkEmount Veteran

    489
    Nov 21, 2014
    Was wondering if you could see his cards reflected in the sunglasses?
     
  4. dmward

    dmward TalkEmount Veteran

    200
    Mar 21, 2015
    Metro Chicago
    David
    I wasn't playing at the time. Just taking pictures. And, no, the cards are too small a reflection and the curvature of the glasses makes it difficult to get an angle. I suppose, if one worked at it, it might be possible. We've joked about it as a group.
     
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  5. soopadoopa

    soopadoopa TalkEmount Regular

    68
    Jun 3, 2015
    Doesn't matter - Stan Lee would still kick your ass ;)
     
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  6. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Aug 6, 2011
    This was really dark. Nighttime, lights off in the room, all light coming from the next room over (behind me). ISO 102,400, f/1.8, 1/80s

    20911276935_95cc2dfe82_h.
    DSC3161
    by Amin Sabet, on Flickr
     
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  7. serhan

    serhan TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 27, 2011
    NYC
    Excellent shot, impressive for ISO 124,000...
     
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  8. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Aug 6, 2011
    Thanks, Serhan. Even in color I was pleased with this given super low light and ISO 102,400:

    Color.
     
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  9. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    I once did shots with ISO 1600 film (Fuji if I remember corrrectly) when there was only lighting from some candles and the blue flames from grill units on the tables. Nikon F3, Nikkor 35/1.4 wide-open @ 1/15, no IBIS :). The pictures from that session look a lot worse than this one in terms of noise and color. Amazing what present-day cameras can do.
     
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  10. SpaceManSpiff

    SpaceManSpiff TalkEmount Top Veteran

    547
    Dec 13, 2013
    Tucson, AZ
    Eric
    This is crazy! Blows me away what we can do with modern cameras. Lens construction aside, this is the golden age.
     
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  11. dmward

    dmward TalkEmount Veteran

    200
    Mar 21, 2015
    Metro Chicago
    David
    Following a meeting Tuesday evening I went to the museum campus in Chicago to shoot some long exposure skyline images.

    I manually focused the Batis so that it showed infinity, F8 and ISO 25600.

    Normal processing in Lightroom without any noise reduction.

    two frame pano with about 50% overlap. Lightroom says its about 10700 pixels wide by normal A7RII height.
    [​IMG]
    The thin strip of lights to the right are on Navy Pier and the sky does go black there since there are no street lights to reflect off the cloud cover. The Sodium Vapor lights have a distinct orange color reflected off the clouds.

    Here is a version shot at 100 ISO, not quite as wide a view, only 8930 pixels wide, by 4082 high.
    [​IMG]
    The exposure was about 15 seconds.
    And here are links to both full sized JPGs.

    high ISO: ISO 25600 61 MB file

    low ISO: ISO 100 12.6 MB file
     
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  12. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    I agree. I have some ISO 1600 shots taken just a few years ago with my old Panasonic G1 that look a lot worse than that ISO 102,400 shot! Unbelievable. :bowdown:
     
  13. Amamba

    Amamba TalkEmount All-Pro

    Apr 13, 2013
    SE MI
    I have to force myself to bump ISO to 6400 on my Nex-6, even thought the results are often very decent, if noisy. Old habits die slowly.
     
  14. SpaceManSpiff

    SpaceManSpiff TalkEmount Top Veteran

    547
    Dec 13, 2013
    Tucson, AZ
    Eric
    Yeah, that measly 6,400 ISO is at the very top of my comfort limit on the NEX-6 as well.
     
  15. Amamba

    Amamba TalkEmount All-Pro

    Apr 13, 2013
    SE MI
    These two shots were taken at ISO6400, 1/320, f7.1 (top) and f10 (bottom; I didn't have to stop it down as much, but was curious if this would make a difference).

    Little processing / some NR applied in C1P.

    20265164344_65de40f3f6_b. DSC03485-1 by BugsDaddy, on Flickr

    20265364284_22bf2ea905_b. DSC03487-1 by BugsDaddy, on Flickr

    Now, ISO6400 is as high as I would willingly go with Nex-6, and only manually (my Auto ISO limit is set at 3200).

    Is A6000 any better ?
     
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  16. serhan

    serhan TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 27, 2011
    NYC
    • Like Like x 1
  17. SpaceManSpiff

    SpaceManSpiff TalkEmount Top Veteran

    547
    Dec 13, 2013
    Tucson, AZ
    Eric
    Amamba --from what I understand the answer is no, not really.
    http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/sony-a6000/sony-a6000-image-quality.htm
     
  18. Amamba

    Amamba TalkEmount All-Pro

    Apr 13, 2013
    SE MI
  19. soeren

    soeren TalkEmount Top Veteran

    657
    Dec 12, 2014
    N├Žstved, Denmark
    Soeren
    I think that would make a heck of a pic :)
     
  20. ChronoBodi

    ChronoBodi TalkEmount Rookie

    14
    Sep 30, 2015
    the decent-looking noise might have to do with the BSI sensor's more film-like light gathering than front-side sensors. It makes sense, since in previous non-BSI sensors, the light would have to go past circuitry to get to the actual photosites. in the BSI design, the light hits the photosites, nothing in the way, and thus, closer to how film would capture the light. But it's not exactly the same, film is completely flat and doesn't care how light hits it, and while the BSI sensor does come closer to film's characteristics, the fact that it's still digital photosites that prefers perpendicular light rays over angled light rays means the sensor isn't film-like 100% yet, but we're getting closer.