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RhinoCam stitching back

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Bimjo, Mar 7, 2013.

  1. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    You've all probably seen the announcement by Fotodiox about their new piece of equipment for NEX cameras, the RhinoCam stitching back.

    I've linked to a review site since this device has generated so much interest that the Fotodiox site has all but ceased to function. New Accessory from Fotodiox Puts a 645 Medium Format Back on Sony NEX | Fstoppers

    So, what is a stitching back and why would you want one? A stitching back allows you to create very large (over 140Mp using a NEX 7) image file by taking up to 8 adjacent images so you can use software to stitch them into the large file.

    But wait! I can already do that on my own, right? Yes, you can, but the RhinoCam allows you to do it much more accurately than you can do it manually. But, I can do this with a pano head, right? Yes, you can, but a stitching back removes the need to deal with parallax. So why is not dealing with parallax a big deal? You could manually stitch the images from a stitching bck into a larger file rather easily. Trying to stich a two row pano from a pano head manually can be a nightmare.

    So why do I need a 140+Mp file in the first place? Have you ever wanted to print a poster sized shot that is very detailed? This is a rather inexpensive way to do it. Ok, $500 plus a medium format lens isn't chump change, but it's a lot less expensive than a medium format digital back/camera/lens which can easily set you back $20,000 or more. Less than $1000 seems like a real bargain in comparison.

    So, a stitching back is all I ever need to make really big prints, right? Well, no, it isn't. A stitching back does one thing- it makes really big files. What it won't do is 360 degree or spherical panos. You'll still need a pano head to perform those tasks. But a stitching back makes sense for making large image files or single row panos of large flat objects, e.g.- a building from across the street.

    Is a stitching back for everyone? No, it isn't. But for those who can make use of one, the RhinoCam seems to be viable, inexpensive option. I'm trying to figure out what I might be able to sell to get one myself :)
     
  2. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Well, Ic can make great 105x70 cm prints from my NEX-5, and I guess great 150x100 cm prints from a NEX-7. That's as big as I need. I won't buy a medium format lens judt to get more resolution. After all, the fun whike shooting also matters, and that just may be too much of a hassle.

    Apart from that, it only works for absolutely still subjects. Try shooting a landscape in the night with stars? Forget about it with the RhinoCam, stars simply move too fast. As for normal landscapes, I usually try to wait for some birds or other dynamic things to give them more live - another thing that can be pain in the ass with a stitching back.

    For all other types of photography, it's pointless anyways. (Architecture, yes, but that falls in the landscape category for me)
     
  3. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Well, there is nothing photographic that is for everyone. ;)
     
  4. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    So true. :)

    At least something I can save money on ... The 7N and two of the new Zeiss lenses will suck all my money this year. ;(
     
  5. ghostcat

    ghostcat New to TalkEmount

    1
    May 3, 2013
    in my opinion, just plusing one tool will solve all these problems. i use panorama maker myself for almost 2 years, maybe you can try this. it creates panoramas like professionals in easier way. besides, it can make 360 panorama and 3d panorama.