Raw vs jpeg - why is raw bended and corners dark? (nex-3n)

Discussion in 'Sony Alpha E-Mount Cameras' started by plex, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. plex

    plex TalkEmount Rookie

    17
    Jul 6, 2013
    Hi

    I'm playing with my new Nex-3n :)

    I'm wondering why the pictures are bended, and corners get dark, when I shoot in raw mode???

    jpeg
    DSC00029.

    raw
    DSC00029_raw.
     
  2. plex

    plex TalkEmount Rookie

    17
    Jul 6, 2013
    It's easier to see here....

    jpeg
    DSC00023_2.

    raw - the can is total out of shape??
    DSC00023_raw.
     
  3. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    It's because the camera automatically makes the corrections for jpg and does not make corrections for RAW files. Depending on which RAW processor you use the corrections are easily made. Some of the Sony lenses have corrections in Adobe Camera RAW and it's just a mouse click to make the corrections. For those lenses with no corrections you have to do it manually, but either way works.
     
  4. plex

    plex TalkEmount Rookie

    17
    Jul 6, 2013
    Ohh... Forgive me - I'm very novice with cameras :D

    So my kit lens 16-50, must be without correction then?

    I'm Mac user, so I only have iPhoto and Aperture - is it possible there?

    I still don't understand, why raw needs corrections? Is't because the optics are not linear?
     
  5. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    RAW files are just that- raw. As opposed to jpg files which are processed in-camera. RAW files are, for lack of a better term, digital negatives that you then process to your liking.

    I know iPhoto does not have lens corrections available, there may be (but I doubt it) some ability to correct lens distortions. Aperture should have some lens correction capability, but I don't use either program so I really can't say. There are some Aperture users here though, hopefully they'll chime in with an better answer for you. :)
     
  6. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Aperture doesn't have built-in lens correction either. There is a plug-in (PTLens) you can buy for US$25 that will give you the ability to have one-click corrections for many lenses, including the SELP1650. There's also a trial version you can download if you're unsure about buying it. But if requires you to save the image as a TIFF first, which kind of negates one of the main advantages of shooting raw: the ability to keep your image in its original, unchanged state even after you apply your post-processing tweaks to it.

    Adobe's Lightroom is probably the easiest way to go if you need lens corrections. And without them, raw files shot with the SELP1650 (and several other lenses) are severely crippled.
     
  7. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    But - because I feel this hasn't been brought up clear enough here - it's the lens itself which is to blame here, not the RAW file. Other lenses may not need corrections at all, although cheaper ones usually need some software help (the Sigma duo is a nice exception, among others).
     
  8. plex

    plex TalkEmount Rookie

    17
    Jul 6, 2013
    Hi

    I've tried with PTLens, but it's not compatible with Aperture version 3.4.5...

    So maybe I should give Lightroom trial a shoot, or just stick to jpeg. I can see more detail with raw yes, but things could be a little more easy. Strange Aperture doesn't have this function - it seem like a half product without, if lens correction is pretty normal.
     
  9. plex

    plex TalkEmount Rookie

    17
    Jul 6, 2013
    Sigma duo - the 19mm and 30mm? I'll have the 19mm tomorrow :)
     
  10. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Oh, Aperture can devignette the corners. And for the distortions - do you really NEED to correct them? In most photos these will not be visible depending on the subject, and if you correct it, you'll loose resolution. And frankly, most lenses nowadays are corrected quite good - consumer grade zoom lenses being the obvious exception many times, unfortunately.
     
  11. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    These lenses are designed to be corrected, Poki, it's not supposed to be optional. The raw file, when corrected, gives you as much coverage (or more, depending on the quality of your raw converter) than the jpeg does. In the case of the SELP1650, the uncorrected raw file gives you a field of view of ~14mm, so the corrected image doesn't omit anything you'd otherwise be getting with a traditionally corrected 16mm lens. Nothing is "lost."

    I'm guessing by your comments that you consider using software correction to be a second rate way of designing a lens. Fair enough. But I don't really care how the lens designers at Sony go about delivering a quality image—and this lens certainly delivers—if they can price it within my budget. In the end, the final image is all I really care about.
     
  12. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    In the end, it crops out things to correct the distortion, which reduces the maximum possible resolution of the sensor. Can the final image be awesome? Sure. Nobody will notice a slight decrease in resolution. But I would know it happened, and that's the main point for me.

    And still I think 3% barrel distortion is nothing to worry about in most scenes.
     
  13. plex

    plex TalkEmount Rookie

    17
    Jul 6, 2013
    Hi

    I've just tried Sony's own Image Data Converter, and it does automatic do the lens correction :)
     
  14. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Well then, you're good to go!
     
  15. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick

    I don't miss using that program a bit, lol :D