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question on adapters

Discussion in 'Sony Alpha E-Mount Lenses' started by BJW, Dec 3, 2012.

  1. BJW

    BJW TalkEmount Regular

    105
    Sep 30, 2011
    USA
    Bruce
    With apologies for this question but what is considered by most folks as the best adapter for Nikon lenses, both legacy and current? I understand they will be manual focus on the NEX will they however, automatically adjust for the correct exposure or is that also done manually?
    Thanks!
    BJW
     
  2. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Brian, most everyone here uses the inexpensive chinese adapters without issue. Two of the more common trade names are Rainbow Imaging and Fotodiox.

    If the lens you intend to use has no aperture you'll have to get an adapter that will adjust the aperture. You can identify these as most have a sliding switch marked "Open -- Lock" or something similar.

    You don't get full control though, on my Pentax adapter I only get 5 discrete stops between wide open and fully stopped down.

    I'm sure someone here has adapted Nikon lenses and can give you a more complete picture.

    hth
     
  3. markoneswift

    markoneswift TalkEmount Veteran

    390
    Oct 17, 2012
    I use 'cheap' chinese adapters for Canon FD and M42 screw thread. My lenses are all fully manual, in other words you have a manual aperture ring directly on the lens as well as focus and zoom control. If you are using 'modern' lenses designed for digital ( Canon EOS for example ), then the adapter has to have a built-in aperture iris as Jim mentions. The 'open-lock' switch on my Canon FD adapter operates the aperture lever that is present on the lens though - the adapter itself doesn't have an iris in it.
    One issue I do find ( and I'm not sure whether it's specifically related to the build quality ) is that my adapters struggle with infinity focus - I quite often have to bring the focus back a bit from the 'infinity' mark to get it sharp. I've heard of adapters needing to be 'shimmed' to compensate for this, so maybe that is just a by-product of cheap mass manufacturing.
     
  4. RalllyFan

    RalllyFan TalkEmount Regular

    139
    Dec 2, 2012
    Massachusetts
    Tom
    I have the Fotodiox adapter that I use with new and old Nikon lenses. You need the adapter for 'G' series lenses if you want to use both (that has the aperture ring built into the adapter as Bimjo pointed out). My copy will focus at infinity no problem, however I understand there is a lot of sample variance so this may or may not be the case for you, but it's not a big deal.

    Basically, with newer lenses that don't have an aperture ring, you will use the crude aperture ring on the adapter, which gives you no indication of what aperture you're using and only has about 5 stops. For lenses with the aperture ring, you set the aperture as usual. Make sure in the camera settings you set the camera to shoot without a lens attached. The camera will adjust the shutter speed and ISO (if you have auto iso on) on it's own in manual or aperture priority modes, but you still need to set the aperture. I typically shoot in aperture priority all the time, so it's just a matter of adjusting the aperture ring with an adapted lens as opposed to spinning the dial on the back of the camera for a native E-mount lens. Full auto will not be an option.

    The adapters are cheap enough to buy, so go ahead and grab one and have fun!
     
  5. BJW

    BJW TalkEmount Regular

    105
    Sep 30, 2011
    USA
    Bruce
    All the lenses have aperture rings so it would seem other than focusing they should set the exposure or do I need to adjust the aperture in aperture mode to correct for exposure? I know NEX has a focus “peeking” mode to aid in that respect.
    Thanks to all!
    Bruce
     
  6. markoneswift

    markoneswift TalkEmount Veteran

    390
    Oct 17, 2012
    As the lens has manual aperture, just shoot in Manual. Set aperture / focus on lens, dial in a suitable shutter speed and choose an ISO ( or auto ). Use the histogram to check exposure ( I do ) and peaking is good for checking focus but I tend to fine tune with MF Assist for a magnified view too.
     
  7. quezra

    quezra TalkEmount Top Veteran

    916
    Aug 22, 2012
    You can't choose auto ISO in M mode. But shutter priority gets you auto ISO, and aperture priority is basically like full auto since the camera doesn't recognise adapted lens (hence the need to shoot with lens not attached in your menu settings).
     
  8. lowincash

    lowincash TalkEmount Regular

    131
    Dec 21, 2011
    Los Angeles
    Kin
    Holy cow! I have a Canon FD 70-210 lens that when I adjust the aperture ring, nothing happens. All this time, I never knew what that "Open-Lock" thing was until I read this. I tried it and I'm able to adjust the aperture ring lol

    btw I'm using rainbow imaging adapter I got off amazon for like $25 :D
     
  9. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Knowledge unshared is wasted. ;)

    Now go shoot some pics & post them. :)
     
  10. Jefenator

    Jefenator TalkEmount Top Veteran

    876
    Nov 23, 2012
    Oregon, USA
    Jeff
    FWIW I think the "open/lock" ring on Canon FD adapters serves a slightly different function than the adjustment ring on adapters for Nikon G lenses.

    The FD lenses require the open/lock ring on the adapter to be set properly in order to stop down to the aperture set by the ring on the lens.

    Nikon G lenses have no aperture ring, but my understanding is that they can be mechanically stopped down via the ring on suitable G lens adapters. Imprecise, but better than nothing. (Probably better than the adapters that have their own whole aperture mechanism.)

    If use with the NEX system is a major consideration, it's probably best to steer toward the older Nikon lenses that have their own aperture ring.

    IME non-smart-adapted lenses meter wonderfully in manual or aperture priority mode.