1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

'PIE' (Picture Information Extractor) displays Lightroom activity

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by roundball, Apr 7, 2015.

  1. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Since I already have an excellent comprehensive file folder structure in Microsoft Office for all my images, I don't use Lightroom to store them.
    And as far as I can tell, once an image has been imported into/tweaked by/exported out of Lightroom, Lightroom keeps no record of any adjustments it made to that image.
    Furthermore, as far as I can tell, when importing an image previously tweaked by Lightroom back into Lightroom, those tweaks do not automatically reappear.

    However, as an afterthought I just opened the excellent software product PIE (Picture Information Extractor) and lo & behold, discovered if an image has been tweaked with Lightroom, all that Lightroom activity is imbedded within the image, and PIE extracts it right out under an 'XMP' section heading.


    Since I'm still a neophyte with Lightroom, let me ask this question:
    Since Lightroom does in fact store its metadata in an image file that it exports, does Lightroom have some function / feature tucked away somewhere I simply haven't found yet...that allows us to display that same imbedded metadata about previous Lightroom tweaks, if I import a previously tweaked image back into Lightroom ??
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2015
  2. robbie36

    robbie36 TalkEmount Veteran

    488
    Nov 21, 2014
    The way Lightroom is designed to work is that when you 'export' from Lightroom your original raw file with all its tweaks stays in Lightroom. You may reimport the exported file - if you have used another editor (say Photoshop) but at that point, the original Lightroom tweaks lose their significance.

    But to answer your question!!. Lightroom natively shows very little of the metadata and you cant edit what metadata it shows. However Jeffrey Friedl makes two plugins for Lightroom that help. One is called metadata viewer that lets you see all metadata written into the file. The other is called metadata preset builder that I believe lets you configure what metadata Lightroom shows (I havent used that one).

    Incidentally Jeffrey Friedl has a very useful Chrome add on which lets you check all the metadata of any photo posted on the internet with the right click of your mouse. For instance, Roundball, your Avatar has no embedded colorspace in it, so it will look different to different viewers.
     
    • Informative Informative x 5
  3. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    I have no idea what that means...its a JPEG shot.
     
  4. chrid

    chrid Super Noob

    807
    May 5, 2014
    australia
    Chris
    I think he means the jpeg file doesn't have a designation between srgb or adobe rgb, pretty sure jpegs have similar meta date just like a raw file.
     
  5. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Yes, JPEGs have metadata...I was saying I didn't know what this means:
    "...no embedded colorspace in it, so it will look different to different viewers..."

    Its a JEPG avatar, like avatars I've used on various forums for 15 years...why would this one look different to different viewers ??
     
  6. chrid

    chrid Super Noob

    807
    May 5, 2014
    australia
    Chris
    Because if it doesn't define its colour space some programs might try to display it in srg or adobe rgb. When displaying the image in the wrong colour space it might stretch or shrink the colours. This is why when saving jpegs for web use it is always advised to use srgb as its the basic standard used much more prevalently even though it is inferior to adobe rgb. Here is a website showing the differences in the two colour spaces, srgb standard gamut, adobe rgb wide gamut. http://mosaicdesignservices.com/webgraphics/presentations/2007-02/argbvssrgb.htm Also this is why monitors that have adobe rgb capabilities tend to be more expensive.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. robbie36

    robbie36 TalkEmount Veteran

    488
    Nov 21, 2014
    When you create a jpeg you define a colorspace for it. For the web the best colorspace to use is sRGB. When you export a jpeg from Lightroom you also set what metadata to write into the jpeg. I choose the 'all' option generally. So if you look at the embedded metadata in this photo below you will see about 100 different lines....

    sunel2 (1 of 1).

    I see quite a lot of people strip out all their metadata. This has potential disadvantages such as the photo has no copyright information. Also if you strip out the embedded colorspace info, it is likely to mean different viewing on different computers. Arguably giving out 'all' metadata can cause you potential problems. The metadata in the above photo contains my name address and tel no... ...there is probably a bot somewhere beavering away at sending me some spam on insurance.
     
  8. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Great tip, thanks!
     
  9. nippa

    nippa TalkEmount Rookie

    10
    Oct 1, 2014
    Nice to see PIE mentioned.
    I've been using the PIE Studio for the last ... oh must be 6 years and still receive occasional updates.
    Excellent software
     
  10. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    I've just been using whatever the LR defaults were...cycled an image through this morning to see what the 'Export' page setups were and sRGB is the default.
    Didn't happen to see anything about an "All" option...maybe that's a default as well ?