Old Rails

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by Simsy, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. Simsy

    Simsy TalkEmount Regular

    141
    Dec 23, 2012
    So I was outdoing some random shooting today and I came across this stack of old rail line.

    Shot on my nex f3 sel16mm with wide converter

     
  2. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Nice perspective shot.

    A few sun spots made it in though.
     
  3. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Hehe, that rail is somewhat "in your face" isn't it? that makes the pic though. Same subject shot from waist or eye level just isn't the same. :)
     
  4. Simsy

    Simsy TalkEmount Regular

    141
    Dec 23, 2012
    Yeah its a pitty about the sun spots but there just wasn't anything I could do about them, it was a early morning shot taken around 8am so the sun was coming in low and bright I tried to shade it with my hand but I just ended up seeing my hand in the shot because of the wide angle lens I was using and I couldn't exactly move the subject around. But given all that I still decided to post this pic because it just jumps out at you or as Bimjo says its in your face. I was attempting to use the wide lens for something other than landscapes trying to get a different perspective so to speak. It's amazing how close you need to get when using the wide in this way I was no more than 1 foot away from the end of the rail in this shot yet I got the whole pile in it and a bunch of background that I cropped out. I think a different time of day would avoid the sunspots but then the light would be a lot harsher.
     
  5. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    I just read an article the other day about how to use a wide angle lens. The gist of the article was that most people get it wrong by being much too far away from the subject when they should in fact get very much closer to it. You pic shows why that is true. :)

    Honestly I really didn't even notice the sunspots until you mentioned them. Looks like a easy clone operation if they really bother you.
     
  6. I really like the perspective. Neathly done!

    Verstuurd van mijn GT-N7000 met Tapatalk
     
  7. Nubster

    Nubster TalkEmount Veteran

    474
    Jan 5, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Chad
    Yes, very cool, and I'd imagine those spots would be very easy to remove if you really felt the need. I don't think they take away from the shot at all. This is something I need to work on. Creativity. You saw a great photograph potential. I would have seen a pile of scrap metal. That's definitely something I've had to fight hard for, making creative shots.
     
  8. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Chad, some days the scenes just scream "shoot me! shoot me!" at you and some days they could hit you in the head and you still wouldn't see them. Just the way it goes. :)
     
  9. Simsy

    Simsy TalkEmount Regular

    141
    Dec 23, 2012
    The best way to learn creativity is as I did find a group of other shooters and go out for a walk 4 or five people is a good number. While your out there watch what others are shooting it will open your eyes, things that I would just walk past were being shot to great effect, all of a sudden you will start to see what others see. Stop at a coffee shop and ask them what they liked or didn't like in the area you were in and what techniques they were using.

    To me you could go to heaps of lectures read every book and magazine chat on forums but none of it will help as much as getting out there and giving it a go.
     
  10. Nubster

    Nubster TalkEmount Veteran

    474
    Jan 5, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Chad
    Yeah, I have my moments but they are far and few between...lol...I just don't get out to shoot nearly often enough.