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NEX: Future of APS-C?

Discussion in 'Sony Alpha E-Mount Cameras' started by stakx, Sep 30, 2011.

  1. stakx

    stakx TalkEmount Rookie

    10
    Sep 30, 2011
    Hi,
    I currently use a Canon Rebel XSi-- a nice, entry level APS-C DSLR. After using it for several years and thinking about upgrades, along comes NEX-7.

    If I'm going along the DSLR upgrade path, I'll move to full frame. But NEX-7 seems to offer many of the necessary attributes including viewfinder, speed of autofocus, and nice manual controls, in a compact body. The lens designs could be more compact, but it sure beats traveling with a DSLR kit. (Some think micro 4/3 has a better form factor b/c the NEX lenses are so large-- presently, I'd agree with them on this point, but I'm hopeful that optical engineers will fix that in the coming years. I think sensor design definitely favors the larger APS-C compared to micro 4/3 and the Nikon 1 CX.)

    In a few years, I'm sure the EVF will be superb, and future users will wonder why anyone ever wanted an OVF.

    Too bad Sony doesn't use a standard hotshoe-- who thought of that one? (My beef with Sony has been these weirdo proprietary formats, like their memorystick.)

    So: I'm now saving for a NEX-7 (or the version that comes out when I've got the cash). I'd definitely go with NEX over Canon APS-C and Nikon DX DSLRs if I were in the market today.

    We've already seen Nikon's choice in mirrorless. I wonder how Canon will respond.
     
  2. Phoenix

    Phoenix TalkEmount Top Veteran

    859
    Aug 25, 2011
    Melbourne, Australia
    Phoenix Gonzales
    Hopefully Canon comes up with a refreshing response rather than the run off mill kind of reaction I feel Nikon has come up with.
    Instead of releasing yet another compact mirrorless unit I hope Canon revives it's rangefinder line of cameras and thus producing it's new line of digital rangefinders. Canon has produced quite capable rangefinders in the past with their P model and their SB IV model which was equal if not superior to the Leica M3 back in day.
    In a market already over saturated with dslr models and now EVIL (milc, ilc, mirrorless, etc) cameras there is a digital rf niche to be filled and is currently monopolized by Leica.
     
  3. stakx

    stakx TalkEmount Rookie

    10
    Sep 30, 2011
    Rangefinder by Canon would be interesting, but I'm not sure the business/financial case could be made within Canon corporate. (Canon's a huge company.) Would enough prosumers buy such a camera? Would the technologies in a rangefinder find their way into other offerings in the camera lineup?

    (I'm not fortunate enough to have used a Leica rangefinder-- mostly manual controls, right? Therefore not as friendly for consumers, though enthusiasts would crave it?)

    The FujiFilm X100 has gotten a lot of attention b/c of styling, large-ish sensor (APS-C), good overall controls and use-- maybe something like that? I wonder if Canon or another company could make an X100 competitor with small interchangeable lenses.

    (I'm slow and didn't realize that one of the difficulties for lens design for NEX vs. Leica, for example, is the presence of the autofocus and aperture motors. That's also explain the huge size difference between older manual 35mm SLR vs. DSLRs of today. I wonder what kind of miniaturization they can do
     
  4. Phoenix

    Phoenix TalkEmount Top Veteran

    859
    Aug 25, 2011
    Melbourne, Australia
    Phoenix Gonzales
    That's a fair enough assessment, but the same can be told when Sony was developing the NEX models, the question had to be asked, Would p&s users buy such a camera? Would the technologies in a dslr find their way into other offerings in the camera lineup? and ultimately why take a gamble in developing a system that can potentially harm our dslr sales by competing with it? Whatever Sony's response to that question seems to be working for them with the current increase in Sony sales and with the NEX-7 being one of the most anticipated cameras to date :)

    We own a NEX (or potentially own one) because the NEX appeals to us in our own specific way like body size, sensor size, technology, etc.. but I doubt that a lot of users (both current and potential) really crave the NEX for their variety of lenses, Something both Nikon and Canon have an abundance of.

    The Fuji X100 at its very core is a p&s with a good sensor, good lens and looks like a rangefinder at it's very basics.

    The NEX-7 has a lot of manual controls to please the prosumers but also has the option of being fully automated to cater for the consumers. (from current previews anyways)

    Considering the reception these two cameras has recieved...well in the case of the NEX-7 recieving, If Canon (now this is just wishful thinking on my part :) )decided to go left field with the current trend in mirrorless systems and decided to re-invent the rangefinder instead (they do have the technology, the resources, and manufacturing history) by giving it the option of going manual or automated, and thus producing a digital rangefinder (not a rangefinder styled) camera that is compact, sports an APS-C or even a FF sensor (Canon manufactured APS-H sensors as well), able to use existing Canon lenses (whilst not life changing does still outclass Sony's line up imho), affordable and able to compete with other digital rf manufacturers like Leica and.....well...there's no one else there unless we count Epson who stopped manufacturing the R-D1 back in 2007 and still currently costs about $1500 - $2500 USD for the body only (not bad for a 4-8 year old, 6 megapixel, secondhand camera) which I think is a good indication of what the market needs.

    The term "Poor man's M9" is usually associated with the NEX being used as a replacement for the actual camera for those who wish to use the M9 for all of it's merits but does not possess the funds to purchase one. Would'nt it be nice to shoot with an actual camera that we want rather than a surrogate for something else?
    I think the NEX-7 is heading in that direction and hopefully Canon decides to follow in that direction as well.

    Anyway, I'll stop drooling and day dreaming, and just hope Canon surprises us all (in a good way!! :p)with their response.
     
  5. rishio

    rishio TalkEmount Rookie

    12
    Aug 14, 2011
    You can blame Herbert Keppler on the hotshoe. But do read his explanation here:

    Speaking Frankly: Inside Straight: Shoe Fetish
     
  6. stakx

    stakx TalkEmount Rookie

    10
    Sep 30, 2011
    Thx for the info on the hotshoe! I agree that it leaves a lot to be desired, but there's a whole eco-system out there for "standard" hotshoe that can't be tapped by the Sony. Maybe if they included a standard hotshoe converter? (But the added height isn't very elegant.)

    Maybe they'll just one-up everyone with built-in universal wireless that can trigger PW and all the other triggers. Why stop there: they should have it take pics based on mind control. :)
     
  7. Phoenix

    Phoenix TalkEmount Top Veteran

    859
    Aug 25, 2011
    Melbourne, Australia
    Phoenix Gonzales
    Hahaha!!