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New to 'adapting'; confused re: LTM 39 to E mounts

xavyr

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Hmm. Ok, what am I looking at here?

If the heads of these little devils, however tiny they be, are hex sockets, then they are meant to be thread-driven. They don't exactly look like the "headless"/worm type, but maybe they are. You guys who have taken two-part adapters adapters apart - what have you found?

The ends are not peened or staked, so the little shanks theoretically could be reversed out of the threads, permitting rotation of inner/outer pieces from their original relative positions to accommodate re-orientation of the adapted lens as Petro noted in post #18 earlier.

So the threaded holes accommodate shafts whose points or ends provide pressure/friction holding the pieces in place.

Would any allen key small enough to fit these things stand much lateral torque without snapping? Well, they're out there: https://www.amazon.com/0-7mm-3mm-Micro-Hexagon-Wrench-Screwdriver/dp/B073RKGH4P

Looking at McMaster-Carr, I see some pretty miniscule items, ok (https://www.mcmaster.com/metric-screws) but j'e ne parle-pas machinist/engineer; do any here qualify?

Yeesh. The goal is to sandwich a shim. Orientation and 'right way up' of lens markings won't bother me.
More immediately, I still need to gently grind the adapter face to create clearance for the latch release plunger travel.
 

Petrochemist

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Hmm. Ok, what am I looking at here?

If the heads of these little devils, however tiny they be, are hex sockets, then they are meant to be thread-driven. They don't exactly look like the "headless"/worm type, but maybe they are. You guys who have taken two-part adapters adapters apart - what have you found?

The ends are not peened or staked, so the little shanks theoretically could be reversed out of the threads, permitting rotation of inner/outer pieces from their original relative positions to accommodate re-orientation of the adapted lens as Petro noted in post #18 earlier.

So the threaded holes accommodate shafts whose points or ends provide pressure/friction holding the pieces in place.

Would any allen key small enough to fit these things stand much lateral torque without snapping? Well, they're out there: https://www.amazon.com/0-7mm-3mm-Micro-Hexagon-Wrench-Screwdriver/dp/B073RKGH4P

Looking at McMaster-Carr, I see some pretty miniscule items, ok (https://www.mcmaster.com/metric-screws) but j'e ne parle-pas machinist/engineer; do any here qualify?

Yeesh. The goal is to sandwich a shim. Orientation and 'right way up' of lens markings won't bother me.
More immediately, I still need to gently grind the adapter face to create clearance for the latch release plunger travel.
The screws will be 'grub screws' & and shouldn't need much torque to free them. they simply travel down a threaded hole to push against the item inside (which will usually have a V groove or chamfer so they push the inner part against the right edge.

I found grinding the adapter face was best done while the inner part was removed as there's no need to go that far in & it leaves a better light seal...

I didn't check the links too thoroughly but https://www.amazon.de/KooPower-Schraubendreher-Präzisions-Screwdriver-Electronic/dp/B01M7PPJI7/ref=sr_1_16?creativeASIN=B073RKGH4P&dchild=1&imprToken=KjoG.v5Oys5n1hqPdjgfSQ&keywords=7Pcs+0.7mm-3mm+Micro+Hexagon+Hex+Allen+Key+Set+Wrench+Screwdriver+Tool+Kit&linkCode=g13&qid=1595590494&sr=8-16&tag=wwwmu43com-21 (the cheapest of the list I saw from amazon that goes small enough) qualifies it has the smallest hex/allen sizes & IMO is easier to find than the traditional L shaped versions.

You should be able to re-use the grub screws as long as you don't loose them. It's generally best not to take them right out - if they're still in the holes they don't get lost easily :)
 

xavyr

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Grub screw!
By George, that's the slippery and elusive term I couldn't fetch up.
Grub screw, worm screw ... a taxonomy of pests, quite fitting in this instance...

Thank you for the link, Petro; Amazon.de advises that they will not ship here; plugging it into Amazon US doesn't retrieve that specific set, but I'll look among the listed alternatives.

Meanwhile, I will continue sniffing out shim materials. AoA had a solid suggestion about sandwiching thin material in card stock to avoid wrinkling or deforming when cutting ... should try cutting out the inner circle first; looks like a long careful session with a #11 surgical blade.

Grinding. Any I do ... is cautious, timid; don't want to launch into a gross hog-out of material. After marking, will try a bit with a clamped dremel and then see how resistant it is to hand filing.
 

AlwaysOnAuto

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I'd say you're looking at some of the smallest set screws known to mankind there. I know a lot of people call them 'grub screws' but I think you'll have better luck with 'set screw'.
 

Petrochemist

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Grub screw!
By George, that's the slippery and elusive term I couldn't fetch up.
Grub screw, worm screw ... a taxonomy of pests, quite fitting in this instance...

Thank you for the link, Petro; Amazon.de advises that they will not ship here; plugging it into Amazon US doesn't retrieve that specific set, but I'll look among the listed alternatives.

Meanwhile, I will continue sniffing out shim materials. AoA had a solid suggestion about sandwiching thin material in card stock to avoid wrinkling or deforming when cutting ... should try cutting out the inner circle first; looks like a long careful session with a #11 surgical blade.

Grinding. Any I do ... is cautious, timid; don't want to launch into a gross hog-out of material. After marking, will try a bit with a clamped dremel and then see how resistant it is to hand filing.
It was one of the options when I followed your link. Unfortunately our company uses a German ISP, which keeps list my location as Germany. LOADS of junk that way, but at least the random adds are easier to ignore...
You can probably find similar sets on e-bay too, just make sure it lists hex/allen sizes right down to 0.7mm - many sets stop at ~1.3mm.

I have a bench grinder which made easy work of it. Another possibility is just to take the catch off the lens , probably easier with the dremel or a hand file. :)
 

xavyr

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I have a bench grinder which made easy work of it. Another possibility is just to take the catch off the lens , probably easier with the dremel or a hand file. :)
Well, I thought this over, grindin' & a-filin'g on the adapter vs nipping off the latch.
Then I noticed that the latch plunger had a driver slot on the bottom - it's threaded to the top! What if ...?

It's a stepped screw & unscrewed handily, leaving the focus knob with the plunger spring inside. The stop pin is still there, of course, but the lock release latch is out of the picture: no grinding or nipping, and I can always put it back on (unless I lose it).
Talk to me - Any downsides? :rolleyes:

castrated-inf-stop.jpg
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AlwaysOnAuto

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ILCE-7M2       28mm    f/4.0    1/60s    ISO 250

I suppose if I got ambitious and found some snap ring plier ends that were small enough I could take off the lock on my Elmar 3.5cm lens the same way. It is kind of 'weak' when it comes to being a lock.
Good solution IF you can keep track of the parts once they're off the lens. I think that would be MY biggest hurdle.
Now where'd I put my camera....
 

xavyr

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Well, I've just reassembled mine, with an intervening adventure.

Hadn't we just been chatting the other day about screws and and nuts and whatnot launching into the biosphere from the workbench, and the search for same? And the prophylactic insurance of a nappy towel on the work surface to forestall knee-bourne hunts?

Well, that little spring which returns the plunger isn't captured, and I was so excited by the possibility here that I snatched up a driver and set to it, throwing prudence out the window. These parts are small and my digits are not sticky or tacky enough to keep positive grip and off she went.

And so down onto the carpet we dropped, raking the nap laterally with a powerful flashlight in hopes of having it cast a shadow and reveal itself. And so doing, saw that my regular Wednesday cleaning (the den is my province) had been less than inspection-grade, and that the floors beneath the PC dolly and the printer table were alive, hairy, and crawling with dust, hair, crumbs. Tsk. So time out to go fetch the dust sweeper and recoup.

The spring, happily, was on the mouse pad the whole time. And now the den floor is clean.
 

AlwaysOnAuto

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OK, I just finished vacuuming the house for the week, but I'm not dropping any springs.
A question for you X. If you put the screw back in, does the head actually protrude past the surface of the mount?
I guess if it does it just goes to show you the difference between that lens and a Leica as mine sits just above flush to that surface.
ILCE-7M2       28mm    f/4.0    1/60s    ISO 200
 

xavyr

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Oh, fer sher it does. This here is some Russian manufacture, Comrade.
 

xavyr

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It's an Elmar. That's not crap, that's "patina", "character."

Off to treadmill, more bit-hunt.
 

xavyr

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Thanks! Solid idea.
Hmm. Got the gauges - and my engine-feeling days are over - got the snips, too. Huh; I wonder about getting tight enough semi-circle sections out of 'em, or to use a spaced-out pieces of little rectangular chips spread around as before.
Still got to get the thing apart, though...
 

xavyr

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At 1:00 am, Amazon received my 0.7mm allen key at their warehouse about 10 miles away.

Hasn't made it onto their "out-for-delivery" van yet, but the hope is to have that adapter in two pieces by this evening and an assembled shim sandwich some time long after.
 

AlwaysOnAuto

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Usually when we get a message like that it means the shipment has to travel half way across the country so it can be properly sorted and sent back to the local shipping company.
 
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