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New NEX to have IBIS?

Discussion in 'Sony Alpha E-Mount News and Rumors' started by lenshoarder, Jan 31, 2014.

  1. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder TalkEmount Veteran

    297
    Feb 7, 2012
  2. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    While I was the one who sent the rumor to SAR, I don't really trust it. Although that picture is interesting ... Whatever, as I use solely Zeiss lenses (which are not stabilized), I'd love to have a body with SSS.
     
  3. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Sony decided to add stability into the lenses, not the body.


    That does not mean they can not add it, but it would break tradition.
     
  4. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    The NEX system doesn't have a very long tradition anyway. ;)

    But I'm with you - paying for stabilization in the lenses AND in the bodies seems kinda stupid. Also, there's no way to use the two in combination for even better stabilization, so they'd have to turn off the sensor based stabilization for most e-mount lenses. So I'm with you - I don't think it will happen, but the mistake on Sonys part is interesting nevertheless.
     
  5. HabsFan

    HabsFan TalkEmount Veteran

    258
    Apr 10, 2013
    Ontario, CAN
    The only thing I would say is that the precedent is there in that Panasonic did that with the GX7. As long as they programmed some sort of logic that would automatically shut off IBIS if you attach a lens with OSS, it could work pretty good. I like OSS for longer lenses because it gives you a stabilized view for framing. This would also make it easier to design more compact high quality lenses.

    I just think it's really strange that they designed this little image showing sensor stabilization clearly on an E-mount style body. If you check some of the A-mount lenses on the UK site, there is a similar picture except that camera looks more like an SLR shape so they had to design 2 images here. Very strange if they never release IBIS for E-mount
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. NkedFatWhiteGuy

    NkedFatWhiteGuy TalkEmount Veteran

    200
    Oct 28, 2013
    Portland, Oregon
    With the popularity of adapted lenses to mirrorless bodies, it seems that IBIS would make good sense... Or maybe that is just my wishful thinking ;-)


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Bugleone

    Bugleone TalkEmount Veteran

    210
    Aug 21, 2011
    When Sony started making 'serious' cameras about 10 years back they did so by buying out Minolta who were very inovative and had in body stabilisation from day one...they made two two DSLR's which both featured this. This was well before Pentax started it's own in body 'anti-shake' and the Minolta method worked much better, as I remember.

    Sony used the Minolta cameras as a basis for their own range but we have not seen the same inovation thru design that hallmarked the Minolta cameras, and Sony has 'withheld' the in body stabilisation because it does not suit it's marketing profile...theres more money to be made by offering more expensive lenes with 'OIS' than allowing users to 'profit' by making a once off payment for body stabilisation.
     
  8. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder TalkEmount Veteran

    297
    Feb 7, 2012
    I don't that's an accurate portrayal of Sony. They made "serious" cameras and lenses for decades before buying Minolta. Just not still cameras. In professional broadcast video, Sony was just not the market leader. They defined the market. For decades, if you step into any TV production or broadcast facility, you would have been surrounded by Sony equipment.

    A modern digital camera owes much more to video cameras than to film cameras. Digital cameras are directly descended from video cameras. The market that Sony ruled. After they bought Minolta, they continued on with their innovation. Camera to note, the Sony R1. If it only it had a interchangable lens, it would have been the first CSC almost a decade earlier. Regardless, much of what we take for granted on digital cameras today was pioneered by that camera. I would consider that innovation.

    As for not having IBIS on their NEX bodies. I think that had much less to do with charging more for OSS lenses and more with having small bodies. There's a reason NEX bodies with larger sensors have been smaller than M43 sensored bodies. With the NEX, they sought to make as small a camera as they could. An IBIS system for a APS-C sensor would have made the body bigger. OSS from a lens, not so much.
     
  9. Bill

    Bill TalkEmount Veteran

    339
    Oct 22, 2012
    Brisbane, Australia
    Bill
    I'm hopeful that we'll see stabilisation in the new "NEX."

    Sony has been working with Olympus, and one of Olympus's most useful innovations lately has been their '5-axis' stabilisation. When their stabilisation came to the OMs, everyone was impressed, but even more impressed when they fitted it into the PENs. Then, Panasonic met the stabilisation challenge with the GX7 (even though there's stabilisation in many Panasonic lenses).

    The NEXs have always been an good way to use third party lenses. In-body stabilisation would be a welcome addition.

    What else is going to make people open up their wallets for a new NEX?
     
  10. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder TalkEmount Veteran

    297
    Feb 7, 2012
    The other thing would be the much older rumor of an autofocus sytem for MF lenses. That could easily blend in with the IBIS rumor. It would be an IBIS platform with a very large Z axis. If the new NEX 7 was exactly the same as the current one with that, it would be a worthy upgrade.
     
  11. WestOkid

    WestOkid TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 25, 2014
    New Jersey, USA
    Gary
    Hmm. Not sure about this. The recently announced OMD EM10 lacks "5-axis" stabilization because it is too small. It is about the size of a NEX and uses a smaller sensor. The only Pen with 5 axis is the EP5. Despite using a smaller sensor and no viewfinder, it is still longer and taller than the biggest NEX; the NEX 6. It would actually be thicker if not for the large battery grip on the NEX.

    That said, I hope your correct. ☺

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Hey! How do I get a ginormous Avatar picture like yours, WestOkid? :D
     
  13. WestOkid

    WestOkid TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 25, 2014
    New Jersey, USA
    Gary
    LOL. I just saw it on laptop. Must be something with Tapatalk. I'm trying to fix it. Thanks.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
     
  14. Bill

    Bill TalkEmount Veteran

    339
    Oct 22, 2012
    Brisbane, Australia
    Bill
    The EM10 still has the 3 axis stabilisation. Those decisions could be as much about money as space. Even if they have to fill a NEX body out by a mm or two, it's probably do-able.

    We'll just have to wait to the 12th.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Don't forget that the picture only showed two axis, so it may well be just a two axis stabilization. This would make sense, also, because it saves money and space and on top of that gives lenses with OSS still value beyond stabilization while framing - OSS is much more effective than a sensor-based two axis stabilization. Such a system would probably give only between 1 and 2 stops of stabilization, whilst OSS gives 3 - 4.