need good advice on buying adapted lens

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by nex6newuser, May 2, 2013.

  1. nex6newuser

    nex6newuser TalkEmount Rookie

    11
    Apr 11, 2013
    I am new to NEX world, i have NEX6 with the kit lens only have one lens at the moment. But the prices of lenses and reading about the adapted lenses being cheaper way to go, i want to get some advice on which lens to adapt. I know a lot of you have their own personal preference so please don't bash on each other with your suggestions. I mostly photograph my two daughters so maybe i'll start with a portrait lens. Please help me decide which way to go, please also provide the adapter to use.

    Thank you so much!

    God speed!

    Erwin
     
  2. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    What type of shots of your daughters do you plan? Them playing? Candids? Formal portraits? There are many lenses that will serve you well, but we need a little bit more info before we start throwing logical options out there. ;)
     
  3. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    Hello

    Adapted lenses are good not only for the wallet but for quality in terms och build and image.

    I'm a Minolta man and can only offer advice on those.

    To take portraits you could look at Minolta MD 50mm f/1.7 or MD 35-70mm f/40 or MD 35mm f/2.8. These lenses are cheap and easy to come by but produce excellent results.

    For adapter you can search eBay for MD NEX adapter and you will find a host from different sellers and manufacturers. I prefer the Kiwi adapters as they a better in terms of build quality and precision.
     
  4. nex6newuser

    nex6newuser TalkEmount Rookie

    11
    Apr 11, 2013
    hi thanks for your response. I mainly do candid/playing shots so most of the time they are moving so i would like to get a fast lens in that sense. I would also want to get a zoom or telefoto lens.
     
  5. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    Hi and welcome ;)

    I'm with Jaf-Photo here (as a Minolta fan myself) and for your type of shooting (portraits) I highly recommend the MD 50 f/1.7. Its an excellent portrait lens (I made a thread regarding this lens - you should be able to find it by searching my username here), can be had for very cheap and has all the good characterestics ie. the beautiful Minolta colours, excellent soft bokeh, its lightweight and small and its fast being an f/1.7 (even by todays terms) - really good when stopped down to f/2.8. Really you can't go wrong with an MD 50 unless you find the FL not suitable for your needs (which I doubt cause I also do a lot of family portraits myself and have no issues)

    If you are able to spend more money then check out the MD 85mm!!!

    The MD 35mm f/2.8 is also an obvious choice but I've found it difficult to come by very often (especially for the price I'm looking to spend for one :D )


    Regarding zooms (and speaking of Minoltas again), Jaf-Photo is again right - the MD 35-70 f/3.5 is an excellent performer (probably one of the best MD Zooms ever produced) and think will also suit you well for your portrait needs (and not only ;) ). Only "downside" is the narrow zoom range (70mm isn't actually very long). In that essence, I would also recommend the more convinient zoom range MD 28-85 f/3.5-4.5 which I find an excellent zoom lens. My latest addition is the MD 35-135 f/3.5-4.5 for which I just received today and upon initial tests I must say I'm very pleased.

    For telephoto there's the excellent MD 70-210 f/4 with the big downside for me being its weight and size...


    ;)
     
  6. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    I think Nick is spot on with his advice.

    All those lenses are more than fast enough for daylight work and the 50/1.7 should work in fairly dim conditions too. I know people who swear by it for portrait work because of the natural colours it produces.

    If you want to shoot in low light then the 50/1.4 is a good economic choice.

    Also, Nick, I am curious to see some shots from the 28-85 :) It's a serious contender for my next Minolta lens, if it's decent across the range.
     
  7. Jazzer

    Jazzer TalkEmount Veteran

    344
    Nov 6, 2012
    New York
    Larry
    Is there a lens you would recommend as a first foray into manual focus for indoor low light (e.g., for museums, etc.)? I was thinking the 50/1.4 might be a little long for this purpose. I have been thinking about the SEL35/1.8 since it has OSS and autofocus, but I would like to try a manual focus lens and see how I like it.
     
  8. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    I rarely shoot indoors or in low light, but there are several experts here, such as Deadbear77. Perhaps they could give some advice?

    When I try those shots, I find that autofocus or image stabilisation is of limited use, compared to a larger aperture.
     
  9. nex6newuser

    nex6newuser TalkEmount Rookie

    11
    Apr 11, 2013
    thanks guys for all your time and responses. I really appreciate you! I know these MD lens are used and sure i can't buy any new ones anymore can you recommend a place to get it, i know a lot of them are on ebay but i wouldn't know how to compare a good copy from not. I'm never good at buying second hand items so it'll be hard for me to judge. how about the adapters? can you recommend a good one?

    Thank you again./

    godbless.
     
  10. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    If you're buying used online (don't most of us?) you have to go by the description of the lens and any pics included. Seller reputation (if given) is an indicator as well. Make sure there is a return policy before you buy. In the end you pays your money and you takes your chances. ;)

    Re: adapters- two schools of thought: 1) buy a really expensive one on the premise that it must be good because it costs so much, or 2) buy a cheap one figuring that basically it's a tube with a lens mount on each end and even if you get 5 bad ones before you get a good one it'll still be cheaper than buying an expensive one.

    Depends on your approach to buying gear. :)
     
  11. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    I don't know where you live, but there are a few very good online photo dealers that sell used [legacy] lenses in some parts of the world. You usually can trust them about the condition of these lenses, and most of them have a solid return policy. The downside is that you'll most likely pay a little more than on ebay.
     
  12. nex6newuser

    nex6newuser TalkEmount Rookie

    11
    Apr 11, 2013
    i just have a quick question, do all minolta lenses fit/ is compatible also with Sony Alpha cameras? just want to know if i need to buy a separate adapter for my 2 alpha lenses- i have 35, 50, SAM's?
     
  13. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Minolta autofocus lenses are compatible with Sony Alpha SLRs. Minolta manual focus (MC/MD/SR) lenses are not; if I'm not mistaken there are adapters available to use Minolta manual focus lenses on Sony Alpha cameras.