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My a7s seems to have some big flaring issues, any ideas?

Discussion in 'Filmmaking' started by scrowley91, Mar 7, 2015.

  1. scrowley91

    scrowley91 TalkEmount Regular

    48
    Aug 10, 2014
    New Jersey
    Sean Crowley


    My a7s seems to flare like crazy, with multiple lenses, (though I haven't tested with any native lenses, cause I don't have any yet) It happens both with and without a lens hood, even with one that is too long and causes vignetting.

    Anyone have any ideas what could be causing this?
     
  2. izTheViz

    izTheViz TalkEmount Top Veteran

    537
    May 10, 2013
    Paris
    Yannis Marigo
    I know the A7 has (fixed in the A7II) but though the A7s would not.
    Are you talking about lens flare (based on the video) or sensor flare ?
     
  3. scrowley91

    scrowley91 TalkEmount Regular

    48
    Aug 10, 2014
    New Jersey
    Sean Crowley
    Whatever flare is coming off the lights on the back of the truck, I'm not sure what is causing the flare, it looks like something caused by the lens, (possibly reflecting off the inside of the adapter?) and wasn't present when I had tested the Zeiss 24-70 FE. (though it wasn't in these conditions.
     
  4. izTheViz

    izTheViz TalkEmount Top Veteran

    537
    May 10, 2013
    Paris
    Yannis Marigo
    Be aware that usually old lenses are prone to flare...what lens was used ?
     
  5. scrowley91

    scrowley91 TalkEmount Regular

    48
    Aug 10, 2014
    New Jersey
    Sean Crowley
    Contax Zeiss 50mm f1.7

    But when used on my old Contax 187 film camera, I was never seeing this flaring, so I don't think it's the lens. Could it be a reflection off of the inside of the adapter?
     
  6. michelb

    michelb TalkEmount Regular

    196
    Oct 27, 2013
    Greater Montreal area in Quebec, Canada
    Michel Brien
    This looks more like sensor to lens internal reflections.
    Digital sensors have a very shiny surface contrary to film and can reflect back the light they receive back towards your lens rear element which in turn reflects it back to your sensor depending on coating and rear lens element curvature.
    This effect will change with aperture used and lens type or model and in the case of your video, the sensor is trying to boost the dark areas and is also boosting the very bright highlights which are then reflected back and forth by your lens/sensor causing the flare you are seeing.

    Film era lenses can be great but there are situations like the one in your video where it shows their limitations once used on digital.

    Can you borrow a native lens to compare in similar situation ?
     
  7. scrowley91

    scrowley91 TalkEmount Regular

    48
    Aug 10, 2014
    New Jersey
    Sean Crowley
    Unfortunately no, I don't have any friends that I could borrow from, they all have Canon or Nikon gear.
     
  8. scrowley91

    scrowley91 TalkEmount Regular

    48
    Aug 10, 2014
    New Jersey
    Sean Crowley
    I also don't think it's that because 1.) it's not hued green, and 2.) It's only ever light sources that AREN'T in the scene, so the couldn't be bouncing off the sensor.

    EDIT: After a little testing, it seems to be much less severe with my m42-nex adapter, when hand-holding the lens. This adapter has ridges inside and a matte coating. It also seems to be quite a bit higher contrast overall.

    There is still some flaring, but not nearly as bad; still not quite as good as my Super Takumar 50 f1.4 in terms of harsh flaring resistance, but quite a bit better. Oddly, it doesn't seem to change at all with closing down the aperture, hinting that it's not lens specific.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2015
  9. serhan

    serhan TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 27, 2011
    NYC
    Interesting video to watch:


    He says the digital sensor is 10x more reflective then the lens glass and the lens coatings are not enough to prevent it. So they do it by lens design/shapes to move the ghost image/flare out of your view.

    After the first digital cameras, the lens manufacturers saw this also and started to coat the lenses more to reduce the sensor reflection. My Tamron 90mm 2.8 was older design and the new version came as di meaning for digital with additional coatings. However older designed lenses with film may not have that sensor reflection consideration like they do with the new lenses designed for digital sensors.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2015