Monitors for amateurs

bdbits

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Bob
I am thinking of getting a second monitor for my desktop at home, and am not well versed in current display technologies. I currently have an ASUS LCD - 22 inch I think, maybe 23 (not at home right now). I think I would like to go 24 or so, but would like to keep it under $200 if possible. Could maybe go a little higher if I have to and the bang/$ is there. But at least something geared more towards photos than gaming.

I assume I want IPS? In my budget I think I will end up at 1920x1080 resolution. Anything else I need to look for?
 

WNG

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Yes, you definitely want an IPS screen for the better viewing angle of the larger area. And 1080 res is the standard max for the price range. IMHO, 27" is the max usable size for this resolution. Borderline need for 1440px or 4K for photography.

I picked up an Asus VC279H that has been very satisfactory. Comes with VGA, DVI, and HDMI inputs....plus they throw in cables for each! Currently, it's on sale with a $20 rebate card from Newegg.com

There's also a 24" version for $20 less.

Cyber Monday Monitors, Keyboards, Mice & Headset Deals - Newegg.com
 

Nubster

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How about calibration? I'm in the same boat. Working on a new computer build or upgrading my current one for photo editing only (no video) and I'd like to upgrade my 5+ year old monitor as well but I also have a limited budget...around $200. I'd like to squeeze out as much performance as I can and I want to be able to edit and print as accurately as I can with my equipment limitations.
 

bdbits

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I think calibration is probably essential if you will be printing. Otherwise, if images will be mostly viewed on displays, I have mixed feelings. This is mainly due to viewing my own images on quite a few different displays and devices, and seeing how they all have a cast of one kind or another. In reality, almost nobody else will be viewing your images on a calibrated display. I think you should try to use a realistic display - as neutral as you can make it so what is seen is close to what you intended. I am just not sure if using something like a Spyder is really worth it for amateurs like myself. Somebody will probably correct me now.

The main limitation with budget is size. You can get some nice displays for $200 but they probably won't be 28 inches. I have not yet made up my mind which one to get. There are some good sales out there for Christmas, so I'd best get off my behind and make a decision.
 

bdbits

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In case anyone is interested in what happened... I picked up an HP 27er, which is a 27" IPS panel. It has a Technicolor(tm) mode and has been certified to have correct colors, whether this replaces calibration with a Spyder or the like I do not know. Resolution is 1920x1080 (aka Full HD) so not really high-end, in fact if not constrained by budget I'd recommend higher resolution at this size. 27 inches is surprisingly big, but I am not complaining at all as it looks very nice and is easy on my aging eyes. It was just delivered yesterday so have not had much time with it, but my photos do look pretty nice (and large!) on it. Nice to have controls and image on separate monitors. I had to turn down the brightness a little bit. I will have to say though that my existing monitor does look pretty darn good next to it, though the new panel is a bit more saturated in color, and definitely brighter. (My existing monitor was a 24-inch ASUS.)

I really got a good deal, I think, at just $139 plus tax (free shipping). MSRP is $249 but I see it under $200 many places at this time, could just be a holiday sale or something. So far, I am satisfied with my purchase.
 

sliver-surfer

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There are 2 things I do to calibrate my monitors.
1- I first do a search for an image such as this image below and adjust my monitor until it looks the way I think it should look and I save and use this profile for making images meant for screens only.
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

2- I print an image on photo paper then adjust the monitor so that the screen image and the printed photo look as identical as i can get them. I save and use this profile for editing images for print only
 
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