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Live View Display - Setting Effects OFF for flash

mdavis501

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Nov 20, 2021
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When using my Sony A1 mirrorless camera, when in a dark studio I must set the Live View Display - Setting Effects to Off in order to have a bright enough EVF to see the model or item being photographed when using something other than a constant light source (i.e. strobe). With Setting Effects ON, I get a black or almost black viewfinder since the room (before the flash goes off) is quite dark. With Setting Effects OFF, I get a bright viewfinder that allows me to properly frame the image.

This works perfectly.

My question is - since the camera doesn't "see" thru the lens into the viewfinder like a DSLR (since there is no mirror), what does the camera do to give me the bright EVF? I know it works perfectly...I'm looking for HOW does it work.

Thanks.
 

bdbits

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Well, it kind of does still see through the lens. The shutter stays open, and the camera uses the incoming image on the sensor to feed the EVF. That is what it is always doing (when on). When you have effects turned off, it is more or less ignoring the exposure levels, and I presume it simply boosts the image to what it thinks is an acceptable level, similar to auto-adjusting exposure to capture the image.

Welcome to the site, by the way. :Welcome:
 

mdavis501

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Well, it kind of does still see through the lens. The shutter stays open, and the camera uses the incoming image on the sensor to feed the EVF. That is what it is always doing (when on). When you have effects turned off, it is more or less ignoring the exposure levels, and I presume it simply boosts the image to what it thinks is an acceptable level, similar to auto-adjusting exposure to capture the image.

Welcome to the site, by the way. :Welcome:
Thank you for taking the time to answer. I thought it must be ISO, but I guess it could use any combination of ISO, SS, aperture to get a decent histogram view into the EVF.
 

Brownie

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Tim
Thank you for taking the time to answer. I thought it must be ISO, but I guess it could use any combination of ISO, SS, aperture to get a decent histogram view into the EVF.
It can do whatever they program it to do, it's a computer. The camera is reading the light using the meter and bumping the brightness to an appropriate level. It doesn't need ISO, SS, or anything other than the meter and a program. Remember, the sensor is always on and seeing something, it just doesn't record an image until you tell it to.

Sometimes it's difficult for us to stop thinking about a camera as a camera in the traditional sense. Where in the past you would need to open the aperture or use a bypass (The old "automatic" diaphragms on M-42 mount) or some other mechanical means to get a brighter view, a digital camera suffers no such constraints.

Welcome!
 

bdbits

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Yes Dan, now that you mention it I do recall reading certain lens/camera combinations did that. Offhand I do not recall which ones, and my own experience says it does not apply to all (for example when using manual or vintage lenses where the camera cannot control aperture). I just grabbed an old Minolta lens out of the drawer and turned effects off. I could see the camera was compensating the EVF when I (manually) adjusted exposure. So I would say how it does it may vary with lens and perhaps camera. But of course it is definitely "looking" through the lens to grab the live image.
 

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