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"Lightroom 5"

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by roundball, Feb 9, 2015.

  1. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Still checking into various PC based products, the one called "Lightroom 5" seems to get pretty favorable reviews.
    Anyone here who uses Lightroom 5 have any showstopper issues with it ?
    Put another way, if you had to do it over again would you still get it?
     
  2. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    I've tried Aperture, and (briefly) Capture One. But Lightroom remains the gold standard as far as I'm concerned. Though it's not a simple program, there are plenty of online tutorials on the Adobe site, so it's not too difficult to learn. And it does almost everything I've ever wanted to do with an image, with the free Nik suite of plug-ins doing the rest.

    BTW, this advice is coming from someone who hates, absolutely hates what Adobe has done with their "hostageware" Creative Suite software, and will be dragged kicking and screaming into that nefarious scheme. But Lightroom is still available as a stand-alone product, and is often thrown in for free with a major camera or lens purchase. So it's a very good choice, IMhO.
     
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  3. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    I appreciate the thorough reply...the past couple weeks learning to use the simple basics provided by Photobucket has been a good learning experience and as far as I can see right now, are all the features I'd be using in a PC based package as well.

    The drive for a PC based package is based on my particular organizational approach to creating dated & descriptive files names of each image...ex: mm/dd/yy Red Shouldered Hawk on log with Brown Thrasher...or mm/dd/yy Red Shouldered Hawk on tree limb.
    And while learning to use the simple basics on Photobucket has been great, its very, very time consuming and I have to get away from that.
    The time consuming part being that after I do my local culling and generate a unique dated & descriptive file-name for an image, I then have to upload it to PB.
    Then bring up PB's editor...go through whatever I need to tweak (contrast, sharpening, etc).
    Then save it at PB...which completely alters my original file-name with jibberish.
    So I have to download it back down to my PC and save the tweaked image to its original file-name.
    Then go back to PB, delete the adjusted / renamed version up there.
    Then upload the final tweaked, properly named photo from my PC to PB.
    Several images, do the math, you see the problem.

    I want to do those simple tweaks locally on my PC then upload the finished photo with it's proper file-name to Photobucket one time and be done with it. And your hands on experience & opinion puts it over the top...will order Lightroom 5 from Amazon and have it in a couple days...thanks.
     
  4. MAubrey

    MAubrey TalkEmount Top Veteran

    Lightroom 5 is superb. It takes time to master, but completely worth it. I'm finding that every time I shoot a different genre, I learn whole new things about processing photos.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    Lightroom 5 is one of the more extensively featured and capable apps on the market. As mentioned, still stand alone. I'm also not happy with Creative Cloud yadda yadda Adobe has pushed.

    There will be a learning curve, if your current P-P is utilizing the tools in Photobucket. I find their site pretty hard to use as they port towards social media, instead of a photo hosting one.
    For all its warts, IMHO, Flickr still offers more and a better experience. They also have online tools if you must tweak online.

    For free PC based apps that you can do basic adjustments, renaming, and databasing your photos, Picasa 3 from google does a decent job. It supports RAW files, but not the last Sony ARW formats. They are working on it.

    Currently, I used Faststone Image Viewer. I think it's operations are faster, and some of its tools do a better job. It's also free!

    For more of a Photoshop experience, and capability, try Gimp. It's Open-Source and free, and I believe they recently released a new version. Began in Linux, now a Windows version available.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. jai

    jai TalkEmount Top Veteran

    589
    Feb 4, 2013
    I stuck with Aperture for a long time, finally crossed over to Lightroom (creative cloud) when it was clear Apple had abandoned it.

    Wish I had done it earlier. The lens corrections (distortion, chromatic aberration) and the noise reduction is just awesome. The mobile apps are great too, especially on an iPad. The creative cloud system is great, and will only continue to get better.

    Just try it out, get the free trial and you'll be hooked.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    System Email from Amazon just now says it'll be delivered tomorrow / Wednesday.
     
  8. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    The main thing I use from the PP on Photobucket is 'sharpening'.
    And I suspect the next most important feature will be 'noise reduction'.
    With most of my interests being nature & wildlife, the majority of shots are in low light and I'm often forced to use ISO200 or 400.....don't like the noise from either of those, or the occasional softness from a shutter speed too slow with a 4.0 / 4.5 tele in low light.
    With a lot of shots during early / late low light, or in low light woods settings with trees blocking sun, or on dark cloudy overcast rainy days, etc...having the 'sharpening feature'...and now also 'noise reduction'...right on my PC via Lightroom will be a big help.
     
  9. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    When I first started out with this hobby, I used Google Picasa as my photo editing program. Its pretty much an "effect" program to me...

    Then I tried Lightroom and never looked back!!! Had version 3 (3.6) initially, then when I swapped my Nex-5 for the Nex-6 I upgraded to Lightroom 5 and now after a recent laptop upgrade (64-bit capabilities) I'm using version 5.6.

    So many things you can do with Lightroom. After 2 years of usage, I can safely say that I know/use maybe 10% of what the program offers :)
    There's a reason why LR (and Photoshop) is such a popular program among photographers ;)
     
  10. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    My Thinkpad and Windows 7 are both 64 bit, but I went with Lightroom 5 mainly its been available long enough for it to have been debugged / stabilized...compared to '6' which is so new and evolving its bound to be buggy right now and I don't want to fight that while also trying to learn a new product.
    With my main interest being the few basic features I'm sure '5' will be all I'll need...probably forever considering my 'senior' status, LOL
     
  11. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    I don't think there's Lightroom 6....at least not yet :D
     
  12. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Apparently about to be released...saw somewhere that Beta is already available...in either case I didn't want to wait for 6 and have no interest in debugging any company's new software anyway, so '5' it is.
     
  13. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Do plan on climbing a fairly steep learning curve if you want to get good results from Lightroom. Sure, you can just move sliders and call it a day. But in order to get really good results from things like the noise reduction and sharpening tools, you're going to have to learn their ins and outs. I have found the free, short tutorials on the AdobeTV web site to be excellent. And if you really want to dig deeper, Scott Kelby's Lightroom Book for Digital Photographers is an excellent resource.

    Like anything worth doing, it's worth doing right.
     
  14. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    I have considered getting LR 5, even though I use Linux. Apparently, it will run under Linux using certain versions of Wine. The thing that's been holding me back is that in the past, my results with using Win products under Ubuntu have been inconsistent - some worked, some were buggy. No way to predict that, either. So for now, I'm still using RawTherapee and GIMP.

    Tony
     
  15. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA

    Just now as an example…Bluebird on a stump...dark, rainy, cloudy, low light…Canon FDn 300/4.0, ISO200, shutter 1/40, resting on the window sill.

    BEFORE & AFTER…just a quick adjustment using the ‘sharpening slider’ on Photobucket.
    ( without compensating for the brightening of sharpening ).
    First priority is to be able to do these basic things locally on my PC.

    Then I can learn and grow (locally) into Lightroom 5 over time.
    If I had to do learn / trial & error, remotely to Photobucket each and every time I tried this or that, I wouldn't do it.



    ORIGINAL / BEFORE




    AFTER A TOUCH OF SHARPENING AT PHOTOBUCKET

     
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  16. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    That's a pretty good example of how using Lightroom will help improve your sharpening, roundball. By using the easy-to-use masking feature, you'll be able to keep that background creamy while still sharpening up your subject. It's an extra step, but it's well worth doing in a lot of cases.
     
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  17. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    Very nice bluebird capture!
     
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  18. jai

    jai TalkEmount Top Veteran

    589
    Feb 4, 2013
    What you might like to do in lightroom is instead of increasing the "sharpening" use the clarity slider.

    Used correctly, the clarity slider can make the photo look as if it was taken with a sharper lens by increasing the micro-contrast.

    Clarity tends to look more natural than the example you showed above.
     
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  19. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Thanks, I'll look into that
     
  20. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    OK, LR-5.2 arrived...installed & registered it...checked for updates...downloaded & installed the latest 5.7 package...will now look it over a little and look through a couple of tutorials tonight
     
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