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Showcase Leitz Macro-Elmar-R 1:4/100

Discussion in 'Adapted Lens Sample Image Showcase' started by Jefenator, Jul 31, 2013.

  1. Jefenator

    Jefenator TalkEmount Top Veteran

    876
    Nov 23, 2012
    Oregon, USA
    Jeff
    This is the older, less sought-after f/4 version. The newer f/2.8 usually runs over $2000, but I was able to get this cosmetically scuffed-up copy of the f/4 for under $400! (For the kind of close-up shooting I do, I would never use f/2.8. f/5.6 is generally as wide as I go, even for focusing.)

    It's pretty hard to tell this lens apart from my other macros in terms of stopped-down sharpness.

    The sun stars I get with the snoot make this my new hands-down go-to. (May not be a huge deal to some, but I'm trying to sell some glass and I want it to look shiny!) 8 even points, easily spotted, often even in the thumbnail images. All without the ghosting that was a persistent thorn in my side with my 55mm 60mm macro lenses.

    leitz100-1.

    Some say you shouldn't call a lens "macro" unless it can go to 1:1. I'll let them take that up with the Leica engineers. Like all so-called "macro" lenses, this has a generous reserve of close-up capability for my product shots. (If I were shooting jewelry I suppose I might feel a need to go beyond 1:2.)

    Like my other Leica macro lens, this 100mm has extra-fine focusing action. My old Micro-Nikkors are not nearly as much of a joy to work with in that regard.

    leitz100-2.

    The Micro-Nikkor 105mm was my previous BOKEH king. I haven't done a proper comparison yet, but I think this Leitz will do pretty nicely.

    leitz100-3.

    I'll post outdoor samples as they become available.

    leica100macro.
     
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  2. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Awesome shots Jeff.
     
  3. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Well, most Zeiss Makro-Planars also only go to 1:2. It's okay for most use cases. It just bugs me when somebody shows a photo of an insect that looks tiny on the photo and claims it's a 'macro' shot. ;) We don't need to discuss about the definition of the word either, as long as the end results look good - and yours certainly do. God, lighting these glass things must be hard!

    As a side question - why do you use a bubble level on your NEX-7 when it has a built in electronic one?
     
  4. Jefenator

    Jefenator TalkEmount Top Veteran

    876
    Nov 23, 2012
    Oregon, USA
    Jeff
    IME the built-in level is not sufficiently precise. Better than nothing for handheld landscapes but I prefer a real bubble level when conditions permit. I was using a torpedo level on the tripod head, but the cube is obviously much more handy. (Even if the built-in level were sufficient, the cube would enhance flow and/or reduce distractions on my viewing screen.)
     
  5. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Those are great shots, Jeff.

    Tony
     
  6. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    I agree - some amazing shots of some very nice artifacts Jeff :thumbup:
     
  7. Jefenator

    Jefenator TalkEmount Top Veteran

    876
    Nov 23, 2012
    Oregon, USA
    Jeff
    • Like Like x 6
  8. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    That's a piece of art (and amazing photos!!!), not just a piece of "paperweight".....:D
     
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    • Agree Agree x 1