1. Reminder: Please use our affiliate links for holiday shopping!

Landscape exercise

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by addieleman, Apr 29, 2016.

  1. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    The photoclub I recently joined, has theme groups and one of them is "Landscape HDR". So we went on an outing the other day and this is what I came home with.

    i-3X3372V-X3.

    i-LmK6M5R-X3.
     
    • Like Like x 19
    • Winner Winner x 1
  2. WNG

    WNG TalkEmount All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2014
    Arrid Zone-A, USA
    Will
    Beautiful light, especially like #1. The shine off the foreground to the left is very nice.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Nexnut

    Nexnut TalkEmount Top Veteran

    #1 for me, Ad. Beautiful shot.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    Yeap, #1 is excellent! Good work Ad :thumbsup:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. slothead

    slothead TalkEmount Top Veteran

    544
    Mar 1, 2015
    Maryland
    Tom
    I like the additional foreground detail of the first one.

    So here are my questions Ad: (1) Did you do the HDR effects first or the stitching first (assuming stitched panorama and multi-shot HDR processes)? And (2) what tools did you use for each?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    No panorama involved, just used 16mm as a focal length. The HDR image is composed from 9(!) bracketed shots, each 1 stop apart from -5...+3 stops. The sun disk in the darkest shot was still blown, the lightest exposure showed good shadow detail as in a normal exposure. The dynamic range here certainly warranted HDR technique. The 9 shots were merged in Lightroom to one HDR image, which I then took to Photoshop for further processing. Especially the possibility to add multiple Camera Raw filter layers in Photoshop is a boon, in Lightroom I couldn't get the tonality I wanted. I also had to get rid of lens reflections, maybe I should have removed the UV-filter from the lens.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2016
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    I like them both.
    Seems like #1 has sharper detail, and can't help but notice / like the touch of sunlight at the lower left foreground.
    Seems like #2 has more overall classic landscape elements in it...more clouds, good water reflection, etc.
    Both keepers for sure.

    I've never tried HDR...and definitely wouldn't have a clue how to process them, LOL
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2016
    • Like Like x 1
  8. slothead

    slothead TalkEmount Top Veteran

    544
    Mar 1, 2015
    Maryland
    Tom
    Well the final product was just fine, so I don't think the UV filter hurt much. One of these days I am going to compare the multi-image HDR approach to my new method (no, I'm not tellin' :) ). I suspect the results of that comparison will show an equality to fall in between the number of images included, but I can't say that for sure right now.
     
  9. pbizarro

    pbizarro TalkEmount Veteran

    358
    Nov 24, 2014
    Portugal
    Fine images. Especially because the HDR is not intrusive, as it happens so often.
     
    • Agree Agree x 5
    • Like Like x 1
  10. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Thanks guys for all the feedback. I sent in #1 for the photoclub's presentation, I'm pretty sure now I picked the right one.
     
  11. Jefenator

    Jefenator TalkEmount Top Veteran

    876
    Nov 23, 2012
    Oregon, USA
    Jeff
    Nice work! I've dabbled in HDR but always abandoned it but perhaps I just need better guidance. o_O
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. slothead

    slothead TalkEmount Top Veteran

    544
    Mar 1, 2015
    Maryland
    Tom
    Ahhh.. So we were your jury! :) Yes I think most of us would agree that you made the right choice.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Well, I feel it wouldn't be right to ask you all to act as a jury without telling you so. I had already sent in #1 before posting, so going by the comments here I concluded I made the right choice. It's funny because I didn't have a strong preference myself, my judgement was probably skewed because I did more work in Photoshop on #2, learning a few new tricks in the process.
     
  14. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Reference post-processing for HDR...is it actually "required" ?
    Or is that just going after optimizing with some finishing touches?
    Reason I ask:
    My iPhone 6-Plus has HDR built in as a photography related choice.
    But I'm certain that Apple didn't plan for / assume millions of iPhone users would need or want to buy any post-processing products and get into all of that.
     
  15. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Depends, I think. The iPhone HDR function is certainly meant to yield a final product, in-camera HDR same thing. No experience with either of them. When you start processing images to get to an HDR image in Lightroom/Photoshop, it's kind of implied that you process it further, that's what these programs are for. The results I got in Lightroom after merging the images to one HDR file, certainly needed further processing.
     
  16. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Your thread has piqued my interest...will have to experiment with some NEX-7 "With & Without HDR" shots...see if there's any worthwhile benefit SOOC...thanks
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Just a quick FYI...experimented with some simple backyard shots of yard & trees, cloudy / low light.
    I do see the blending of the lighting...darker areas back in under tree vs. lighter areas out in the open.

    However, the result wasn't usable SOOC...still needed attention in Faststone.
    And that's fine...the main benefit I saw was balancing / evening out the lighting.
    Will try to remember to include HDR for certain conditions.

    Note:
    The NEX-7 produces 2 images per shot...the first seems normal, the 2nd seems HDR blended.
    If my assumption is correct then, it actually presents a "before & after" result right there...no need to turn off HDR to take a "without" shot for comparison?
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  18. WestOkid

    WestOkid TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 25, 2014
    New Jersey, USA
    Gary
    Nicely done Ad. This is a good example of using HDR for what it was originally intended for; to increase dynamic range. I have no problem with people going crazy with the tone mapping aspects of HDR even if I don't always like the results because I am open to photography as an art. I'm just pointing out that the crazy tone mapping has made people forget how beneficial HDR can be even if the goal is to create a natural scene as Ad did here.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  19. Nexnut

    Nexnut TalkEmount Top Veteran

    Nothing against nicely done HDR as in #1, Ad but since this image has been shot just minutes before the sun disappeared and as you've said the sun was even blown in the darkest image you've captured I'd really like to know how much useable shadow detail could have been recovered from that single RAW file.
     
  20. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    This is the single image exposed at -2 EV, it is #4 from the 9 exposures going from -5...+3 EV. I picked this one because it's the shot with the most exposure where only the sun and the reflection in the water are clipped highlights. I did a quick and dirty processing in Lightroom to make it roughly comparable to the original result. Click on it for a full-res image.
    i-rDcrvPs-X3.

    And here's a comparison between shadow parts in this one (left) and the original (right). There's more noise in the single image, not surprising when you realize that the HDR has had 5 stops more for the shadows.
    i-ZSgN5TC.
     
    • Informative Informative x 4
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1