Is dust an issue for NEX users?

Discussion in 'Sony Alpha E-Mount Cameras' started by Synomis192, May 30, 2013.

  1. Synomis192

    Synomis192 TalkEmount Regular

    141
    May 26, 2013
    I'm getting super attached to my NEX F3, but what I don't like about it is that unlike a traditional SLR, there's no mirror that blocks the sensor. Should that bother me? I never had a problem changing my lens in the open with my Canon DSLR, but I feel that if I go out with the lens that's attached, it has to stay on or else dust will flood the sensor.

    Should I be worried especially with the fact that I use legacy lenses?

    I have some Copper Hill solution that I used to clean my DSLR sensor, can I use that to clean the NEX sensor since they're the same size?
     
  2. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    The NEX is a bit prone to dust. Don't freak out, but do be careful.
     
  3. Synomis192

    Synomis192 TalkEmount Regular

    141
    May 26, 2013
    Alright I just want to make sure I can catch dust before something important happens. Do you know if the Ellipse solution works for cleaning sensor dust?
     
  4. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Dust is an issue with any camera with removable lenses, even those with mirrors. It's not like any of those mirror cameras have hermetically sealed sensors, after all. But there's a lot of mis-information about how fragile the sensor surfaces are. They're not, at least on NEX cameras, they're covered with tempered glass. So unless you start scrubbing it with steel wool, you're unlikely to damage it.

    I've been using the LENSPEN sensor cleaner on my last four cameras (Canon, µ4/3 & NEX), and have not done any visible damage to their sensors.
     
  5. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    So your saying to use steel wool to remove my dust shots:p
     
  6. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    So your saying to use steel wool to remove my dust shots:p
     
  7. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Well, unless it's a really tough speck-o-dust. In that case, I'd just go after it with a cold chisel and 10 lb. sledge hammer. But be sure to pre-heat the sensor with an acetylene torch first! ;)

    (God, I hope no one reads that and thinks I'm serious.)
     
  8. Amamba

    Amamba TalkEmount All-Pro

    Apr 13, 2013
    SE MI
    A rocket blower works 99% of time.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
     
  9. Jefenator

    Jefenator TalkEmount Top Veteran

    876
    Nov 23, 2012
    Oregon, USA
    Jeff
    After a year, I still haven't needed to do any wet cleaning. There's the occasional stubborn spot that needs a nudge with the cleaning pen, and the blower gets the rest.

    IME the NEX system may be more exposed during lens changes but it's also easier to access for cleaning. (That's where fixed-lens cameras make me nervous...)
     
  10. Hot Texas

    Hot Texas TalkEmount Rookie

    10
    May 30, 2013
    I never use wet cleaning, just a blower and a tight wound Q tip and a rocket blower, make suer you hold the camera upside down when cleaning and I also do that when changing lens.
     
  11. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    After a discussion here in this forum, I simply used a microfiber cloth. After more than three years extensive use of my NEX-5, there was some dust I couldn't get rid of just with a blower, and as my local camera dealer wanted to charge me €180 for a sensor cleaning :)O) I just did it. And see there, no scratches and a pretty clean sensor. Clean enough for me anyways.
     
  12. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    This thread by lenshoarder really ought to be a sticky here for all the times someone posts a question about cleaning their sensor. Reading it may bring some reassurance to those fearful of the task.
     
  13. Synomis192

    Synomis192 TalkEmount Regular

    141
    May 26, 2013
    I actually prefer using the Copperhill Method. I mean I don't mind dry cleaning methods, I just found it more effective when I did it with my Canon DSLR. That's just how I handle my sensor cleaning. I cleaned my sensor every 2 months. I think that could be overkill but I handled my Canon in extremely horrible conditions (Beaches, Forest locations, Dirty City Enviornments) So I felt safe just cleaning it using that method.

    I actually want to have a dry method ready for on the fly cleaning. I'll try out the sensorklean pen.
     
  14. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Ya. Although if they are that thick, perhaps they should not be handeling delicate camera parts.
     
  15. Luckypenguin

    Luckypenguin TalkEmount Regular

    110
    Sep 26, 2012
    Brisbane, Australia
    Nic
    I initially had my doubts about keeping the exposed sensor on mirrorless cameras clean, but having used NEX, Samsung NX, and mostly Micro 4/3 cameras over the last three years, I have had far less problems with sensor dust than I did with my former Canon DSLRs.
     
  16. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Didn't work, spot got bigger and blacker. :mad:

    So far wet cleaning hasn't been necessary for me as well, although I will do it if dust won't go away with a rocket blower. Once I encountered a lot of dust on the sensor which went away quickly with a rocket blower but didn't go away after operating the camera's cleaning function before. I'm starting to wonder if the NEX-6's cleaning is really that effective. When I used my GH2 a lot, I occasionally had a dust speck which went away "by itself", i.e. the automatic cleaning on switching off.
     
  17. GaryR60

    GaryR60 TalkEmount Regular

    56
    May 12, 2013
    Seattle
    You bet it's an issue, not just for NEX users, but for everyone using an interchangeable lens digital camera. The problem is that, every time you change lenses (and the best place to do so is indoors, in as much of a dust free environment as possible), you ARE going to get microscopic dust on your sensor. So, you need to get a sensor cleaning tool and a bulb-type blower to routinely clean your sensor with. Even if you clean it, though, you will probably still see some dust spots, now and then, in parts of your images. It's just a fact of life for this technology. So, get used to retouching your images to remove the spots caused by dust on the sensor, too. Recommended cleaning tools:

    LensPen Sensorklear II: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voltaire#Biography

    Blower: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/402856-REG/Visible_Dust_2325429_Hurricane_Blower.html

    To clean the sensor, first remove the lens and hold the camera with the open chamber pointed downward while you use the blower to dislodge dust particles. Next, carefully use the Sensorklear brush to methodically sweep the entire sensor surface with. I usually go one direction and then the other, as if cross-mowing a lawn. Next, blow again, then put the lens back on. Before you start this process, you'll need to go to Menu > Setup > Cleaning Mode and select OK, then turn the camera off, remove the lens and clean.
     
  18. DTK

    DTK New to TalkEmount

    9
    May 10, 2013
    huh? Isn't the "cleaning mode" just 1 second of ultra-sonic vibration to try and dislodge dust? Speaking of which, I've found it utterly useless every time I try it after noticing dust on my images. I've noticed that I only see dust at low apertures, so I only have problems in very bright environments against smooth sky/texture.
     
  19. Janne303

    Janne303 TalkEmount Regular

    80
    Jan 15, 2013
    Uppsala, Sweden
    Janne Eriksson
    I do the same :D
     
  20. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    This is sensible advice. Prevention is often the best cure.