1. Reminder: Please user our affiliate links to get to your favorite stores for holiday shopping!

If you are thinking about wet cleaning your sensor with Eclipse - BE WARNED. DONT DO IT!

Discussion in 'Sony Alpha E-Mount Cameras' started by williadw, May 8, 2013.

  1. williadw

    williadw TalkEmount Rookie

    12
    Mar 23, 2013
    Virginia
    I have owned a Nikon D300 and D700 and ALWAYS wet cleaned my sensor with eclipse and used the Copperhill method. No issues whatsoever... EVER!

    But as of tonight I am left with a crappy looking sensor and will be picking up a new NEX-6 tomorrow and selling this one on ebay for whatever I can get for it.
    ( see pic )

    I emailed CopperHill and they said it had to be a defective coating on the sensor. I have my doubts.
    I am beside myself right now. :frown:

    photo8.



    But now my question is.. at some point.. it will need to be wet cleaned. They all do.. What do I clean it with if Eclipse is not the answer?
     
  2. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder TalkEmount Veteran

    297
    Feb 7, 2012
    I'll give you $50 for it. ;)

    Seriously, are you sure the plate over the sensor is ruined. Isn't eclipse just alcohol? All alcohol will leave a residue. I use 99% pure alcohol and it leaves a residue. Just use some distilled water to clean it off. Read what I did. If I didn't destroy the sensor, I don't see how you could have.

    I tried to destroy the sensor, I really did! - Micro Four Thirds User Forum

    Also, all is not lost. You didn't do anything to the sensor, just the glass plate over the sensor. That's the same glass plate that people swap out for a clear piece of optical glass during an IR conversion. So fixing that camera shouldn't cost more or be more difficult than a DIY infrared conversion.

    Afterall that, if you are still intent on getting rid of it, my $50 offer will still be good.
     
  3. LowriderS10

    LowriderS10 TalkEmount Regular

    122
    Mar 23, 2013
    I've seen this happen on Canons with certain coatings on the filter (the early runs of the 5D Classic exhibited this sort of thing)...I can't remember what the ingredient in the cleaner was that caused the problem, but perhaps you can look into it and see if your cleaner has the same ingredient. If it does...then switching to a brand without that ingredient *MAY* solve your problems.

    Thanks for posting it up, by the way, I'm sure this is going to be useful for a lot of people! How is it affecting the resulting images, by the way?
     
  4. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    This must be awful for you. But like lenshoarder, I think it's still fixable. As a last resort you can change the filter. I don't know what it would cost to do it in a workshop, but try that option first and DIY last.
     
  5. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Yep, that's fixable. Depending on whether it can be cleaned off or if the filter plate has to be exchanged, it costs between €20 and €80 at my local dealer. Might be cheaper at a bigger, better equipped store though.
     
  6. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    I think that DIY option is fine at this point. After that I would try professional cleaning, after that replacing the hot mirror.

    That dirt seems weird. I have cleaned some lenses and the most often happening problem with wet cleaning is spreading the dirt or picking dirt from inside of objective and spreading it around. That has always been oily (helicoid grease, I suspect) but this dirt seems to be dry. It looks like wax or something like it. Anyway it has to be soluble in Eclipse fluid so cleaning with it and changing swaps/pads often may help. Damp swaps take more dirt away than wet or dry.

    Does anybody know the material used in PecPads, they are nor available here in Finland and I would like try them with lens cleaning.
     
  7. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder TalkEmount Veteran

    297
    Feb 7, 2012
    I wouldn't go out of my way for Pec Pads. I've tried them and was not impressed. They are only good for dislodging a bit of dust. Any lens paper is just as good for that. Just like lens paper, they are not very absorbent so for things like oily fingerprints they just smear things about. IMO the best thing for cleaning a lens or sensor is a furry microfiber cloth. Soft and absorbent and really picks up dirt and oil.

    If you have to have them though, you can find them on ebay from sellers that ship worldwide.
     
  8. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    Thanks. I use cheap thin and not furry kind microfibre cloth. Pack of ten lasts a long time. Incidentally 100 14 cm*14 cm microfibre cleaning cloths from China will cost me less than 100 10 cm*10 cm pec pads from USA.

    Yes, the problem with oily dirt is smudging and microfibre is pretty good at a removing it. Removing that dirt from microfibre is quite tough so I was thinking a disposable solution (and found it, those cheap Chinese microfibre cleaning cloths in big bags).

    Some of those cheap lens cleaning microfibre cloths have chemicals in them. I run them thru ultrasonic cleaner.
     
  9. williadw

    williadw TalkEmount Rookie

    12
    Mar 23, 2013
    Virginia
    No clue yet how it affects the image. I need this camera to be perfect at 2pm today. I am buying a second and will worry about this problem later. I will try to use some distilled water (moderately) and see if that helps. Always something....


     
  10. Jazzer

    Jazzer TalkEmount Veteran

    344
    Nov 6, 2012
    New York
    Larry
    At the risk of seeming completely ignorant, but as a complete newbie to sensor cleaning and interchangeable lens cameras, can someone please tell me what it is that I'm looking at that has "ruined" the sensor or coating? Maybe it is just the image on my old iPad and I need to lookon a decent monitor, but what I see is what looks like some fine scratches. Just trying to learn. Thanks.
     
  11. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    It should look like polished glass. Those "scratches" are not scratches but some kind of dirt.

    Clean sensor looks something like that:
    SONY NEX-3 [Review]

    Third image in article.
     
  12. Jefenator

    Jefenator TalkEmount Top Veteran

    876
    Nov 23, 2012
    Oregon, USA
    Jeff
    That's odd, I've had nothing but great experiences thus far with Pec Pads & Eclipse - I've found that combo to be night-and-day better than those old lens cleaning tissues which I have come to loathe.
    Haven't tried this on a sensor yet, though. That is very troubling to think that certain fluids might react & form nasty long streaks with certain filter glass coatings. Another reason I'm glad I've managed to stay dry thus far with my N7!
     
  13. dbmiller

    dbmiller TalkEmount Top Veteran

    777
    Mar 2, 2012
    New England
    I had my 5n sensor wet cleaned at a store about two weeks ago. I stood there and watched her use Sensor Swabs and Eclipse with no issue. I'll try and remember to check the sensor again tonight when I get home.

    Yours was a 6? I wonder if they changed the plate and it's reacting funny. Can you tell if it is actually scratches or just residue?
     
  14. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder TalkEmount Veteran

    297
    Feb 7, 2012
    I wouldn't even use that much. Just use enough to dampened whatever pad you are using to wipe off the residue. When I do it there's no water left on the sensor after I wipe. The residue is just wiped away. I don't use distilled water out of a bottle but instead heat up a bit of water. I then hold a pad over it and let the steam moisten it. I would definitely give it a try. The picture of your sensor doesn't look that different from mine when I run a swap over it with alcohol. It's the residue left over when alcohol evaporates.
     
  15. williadw

    williadw TalkEmount Rookie

    12
    Mar 23, 2013
    Virginia
    I cannot believe it, but I was able to get it off. I tried distilled water. It did nothing. I tried a dried Pec-pad. It did nothing. So I thought, ya know.. what do I have to loose. So I took a really smooth micro-fiber cloth I have and scrubbed it pretty hard. Harder than I would have ever done to try to clean it. I saw a hazed area vanish into now round polished glass. WOOHOO!!!

    After messing with it for about 20 mins, I was able to get all the haze out. I really had to press pretty hard to get it to come out. I guess the eclipse, for some reason left all that haze. I used one drop when I cleaned it and waited like 20 seconds before I swiped the sensor with it.

    I never had this issue with the Nikons, so I have no clue what the deal is.
     
  16. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    It has to be something what the Eclipse dissolved and left behind. Pretty soft if microfibre was able to remove it.
     
  17. dbmiller

    dbmiller TalkEmount Top Veteran

    777
    Mar 2, 2012
    New England
    Damn. There goes our chance to pick up a cheap NEX!

    Congrats on getting it clean again - Go out an enjoy.
     
  18. dbmiller

    dbmiller TalkEmount Top Veteran

    777
    Mar 2, 2012
    New England
    Checked my 5n sensor last night, and it is fine.
     
  19. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Good tip with the microfiber cloth!

    I have some kind of smear on the sensor of my three year old NEX-5 for quite some time now. I was not able to get it off with a blower or a speck grabber, and my local camera store told me they'd charge me €120 to clean it :O .

    So I decided to simply follow you into the dark side and use my best microfiber cloth to get rid of the spots - and yep, it worked! It didn't scratch the sensor, it didn't leave back any smears. Well, some dust is on the edges of the sensor now, but I should be able to get rid of them with the blower pretty easily.
     
  20. williadw

    williadw TalkEmount Rookie

    12
    Mar 23, 2013
    Virginia
    good deal!!