IBIS - "ON" or "OFF"

AlwaysOnAuto

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Is it still recommended that you shut stabilization 'off' when using a tripod with the A7iii?

Reason I ask is, wife wants me to photograph some new quilts so I thought I'd use the opportunity to gain some familiarization with the new camera. I will be using a remote to set of the shutter.
In the past, I'd always leave the stabilization 'ON' when using my A7ii and my Nikon D7000 as well for that matter.
What is the concensus now for the A7iii?

Edit: I guess I look at quilt photography as landscape photography only with a near-field scene.
 
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WoodWorks

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Dunno about the A7RIII, but I suspect it's the same as the A7RII. And on page 65 of the manual for that camera it says:

"When using a tripod, deactivate the SteadyShot function because there is a potential for malfunction of the SteadyShot function."

But I have often forgotten to turn it off when using a tripod, and even with the A7RII's 42MP sensor, I can't say that I've ever noticed any image quality degradation.
 

WNG

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Shot in good light, and not using a long exposure speed, you won't notice a difference in practical terms. Shooting a well-lit stationary quilt won't require disabling IBIS when shot on a tripod. There will be no detectable gain. If you are shooting astro-photography, or a landscape at dusk or night, IS disable may improve results.
Leaving it on means you won't forget to enable it later and discover your shots are out of focus because IBIS was disabled. BTDT! ;)
 

AlwaysOnAuto

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OK. Thanks guys.
You're gonna love this one.
I'm setting up my 'studio' and find that my light stand is missing rubber feet. The legs are sq tubing @1" in dimension. This wasn't a problem when we had carpeting.
So, to keep from marring our new floors I've got come up with a 'foot' I can put on the legs easily.

Pfaff sewing box styrofoam to the rescue. I knew I saved that big piece for something. It just so happened to have round holes in it that are 5" deep and the legs fit perfectly in them. So here's what I've come up with in short order. Let the photography continue...

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The zip lock bags are to 'contain' the styrofoam which sheds like nobodies business. I've got about an inch of cushion at the end of the leg.
 

AlwaysOnAuto

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OK, so I shut the stability off, just for grins.
Here is the 11th shot I've taken with my new camera. Everything is on factory defaults except for the image recording format and the stabilization. First shot is #11 which is a closeup 70mm shot. Second is #10 which is a full shot taken at 28mm or there abouts, I think I was able to zoom in a little bit to fill the frame with the quilt.
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I managed to drop one of my lights and now it doesn't work, but, I have another and it still is working.
Now all I have to do is remember to 'setup' the camera at quilt center since they aren't all the same size and I should be good to go.
Here's an 'overall' view of my 'studio'.
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AlwaysOnAuto

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Well I found out I lied to ya. I checked the stability and it was on. Thought for sure I'd shut it off but oh well.
No harm, no foul, the pics turned out OK focus wise. I'm fairly pleased with the 28-70 lens as it's sharp enough for this kind of work for sure. Plus it makes it easier not having to check focus each and every shot like I'd do with an old manual lens.
Only problem now is my wife doesn't think the colors are 'bright' enough, but I guess that's why there's post processing, right?
 

Richard Crowe

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Three things regarding your quilt image...

First: The quilt is absolutely lovely, My wife, who also quilts, though it was wonderful also...

Second: Did you place a white balance target in your series. I use a WhiBal Card which works great...

Third: The little and relatively inexpensive (as Sony Lenses go - $150 or so on eBay) 28-70mm f/3.5-5.6 lens does a surprisingly good job. I have one and use it for a lot of my images...
 

AlwaysOnAuto

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Richard
1. Thank you. This is only one of about a dozen or so that I had to take pictures of.
2. You hit the nail on the head as to what I see as my biggest problem now. My wife wasn't happy with the colors as shown on the screen. My problem is, I don't know how to make use of a white balance card even if I had one to use. I think the camera sensor is overwhelmed by all the 'white' of the back drop. It thus effects the resulting image.
3. These were shot with a Sony 28-70 lens that I got off Craig's List for $100, and yes it does do a good job IMO.
 

AlwaysOnAuto

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OK, I just did a quick google on how to use a white balance card. I was wondering if just shooting the back drop with nothing in front of it would suffice, or should it be a grey card?
 

AlwaysOnAuto

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Monitor isn't cal'd per se, just adjusted so it shows the multi-levels of grey distinctly.
My wife compared the screen image to the actual quilt when making her statement about not liking the colors.
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These are straight out of camera jpeg first, second is PP'd by me to what I think she will like color wise.
 

AlwaysOnAuto

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I will not be doing this again for a couple of months, it takes that long for my wife to make enough quilts to make bugging me about pictures worth it.
I did some thinking on when I thought I had turned off the stability and I think I exited the menu incorrectly and that is why the change did not take.
 

Thad E Ginathom

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OK, I just did a quick google on how to use a white balance card. I was wondering if just shooting the back drop with nothing in front of it would suffice, or should it be a grey card?
Specifically, look in the Sony manual. There is probably a feature, like the a6500, of pointing the camera at a white card and getting a reading off it to set the colour temperature.

I've never done it, and I'm new to thinking about white balance at all, but there is this place where I take some music pics where they have super-warm lighting that makes people look orange. So I need to get one of those cards and use it.
 
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