How much would you be willing to "invest" in your NEX (APSC Emount) System?

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Jazzer, Apr 2, 2014.

  1. Jazzer

    Jazzer TalkEmount Veteran

    344
    Nov 6, 2012
    New York
    Larry
    At what point might you think that you were spending more than is warranted for the platform? Would you spend as much overall for a NEX system as you would for a DSLR system?

    I'm thinking about buying another lens (perhaps two) that are on the expensive side and it got me thinking about these questions. When I originally purchased my NEX - now a NEX 6 -- I guess I was thinking of it as a camera that was slightly more expensive than, but a natural evolution from, a P&S, with a sensor capable of DSLR-like image quality. I guess I didn't appreciate what a black hole it might become. :biggrin:
     
  2. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Well, I already invested around €5000 in the APS-C NEX system (although this includes accessories which are not system specific), and I plan to buy the 50mm Touit (around €900) and a flash setup (around €800) in the coming months, so I'm quite confident in the system.

    That said, what's the reason you think you should invest less in the NEX system than in any SLR system?
     
  3. Jazzer

    Jazzer TalkEmount Veteran

    344
    Nov 6, 2012
    New York
    Larry
    I guess it's not that I think I should invest less than an SLR system as much as I expected to spend less than I might if I had purchased an intermediate DSLR. When I purchased my NEX, many people I spoke with were urging me to buy a DSLR. It was held out as the "holy grail" of cameras -- better auto focus, better and wider range of lenses, etc. I, however, wanted something smaller and lighter with similar image quality. I guess in the back of my mind, I viewed the NEX system as somewhat inferior to a Canon or Nikon DSLR. Since that time, I see that many people who had SLRs/DSLRs for years have made a transition to the NEX, although some still treat it as a second, travel or "back-up" to their "real" camera. I guess old habits die hard.
     
  4. José De Bardi

    José De Bardi Assistant in Virtue

    Aug 31, 2013
    Dorset, UK
    José
    With the latest gen seemingly having fast AF now, I don't see what SLR has to offer over mirrorless anymore. As for lens choice, E-Mount can be adapted to almost anything unlike DSLRs (including A-Mount with AF) - so that argument falls flat pretty fast too.

    I'm sticking with it and will be investing heavily during the next couple of years.
     
  5. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    It really depends on what you want.

    I bought into the original NEX-3 for the size as well as the price. I was able to get my first 3 for about $400.00. I was one of those point and shoot owners looking to upgrade to better equipment, but shying away for the price and size of DSLR's.

    I like that Sony has built a more expensive, higher end model to prove the platform is worthy of professionals, all the while keeping a more budget model for those of us not willing to spend as much.
     
  6. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Interesting. The way I see SLRs is a little different. In my mind, it's more like SLRs are technology from another century. The mirror solved a problem which no longer exists (TTL VF), so now it's only an unnecessary moving part. One more part which can fail, one more part which can introduce vibrations and ruin images. One more part you have to pay for, one more part which adds size and weight.

    There's no doubt mirrorless is the future, simply because the mirror does no longer solve any problems. It's clumsy, unnecessary, even stupid to have one now.

    Of course, there is a place for DSLRs - at least for now. Some professionals need hyper fast AF, something high end mirrorless cameras can not offer now. But wait a few years and that advantage is gone too. For the hobbyist market, however, there's no reason why SLRs should still exist. Well, no reason except the mindset "hey, let's buy a SLR, because it'll give me better pictures!" some people still have ...
     
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  7. Jazzer

    Jazzer TalkEmount Veteran

    344
    Nov 6, 2012
    New York
    Larry
    I prefer your perspective. ;)
     
  8. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    When I learned that the Sony NEX-7 would let me re-engage an investment in Canon FD lenses I'd stored from years ago, I jumped on it and my only NEX-7 accessory expenses have been the (absurdly expensive) larger Sony eyecup, the video button 'Guard' ring, the Vello LCD screen shield, Canon FD / NEX-7 tripod adapter, and half-case to get a bigger grip area for big hands...actually very little accessory expense in the big picture scheme of things.

    I didn't buy / won't be buying any expensive auto-everything lenses, using this inventory of Canon FD lenses instead:
    24/2.8
    28/2.8
    28-85/4.0
    35/2.0
    35-105/3.5
    50/1.4
    50/1.8
    50-135/3.5
    70-150/4.5
    70-210/4.0
    80-200/4.0-L
    85/1.8
    135/2.8
    200/2.8
    300/4.0
    300/4.0-L
    400/4.5

    And the NEX-7 combined with these lenses has routinely produced better images than I did back in film days using Canon FD lenses on my Canon A1 SLR's. So I'm set for years to come...no plans to upgrade past the NEX-7.
     
  9. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    Well I would actually love the nex system.. I only miss some of the buttons slr cameras have . Iwould be happy in the future to see a slightly larger nex body that can accomodate 3-4 more buttons (that would not increase considerably the size)

    Alex
     
  10. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Which buttons do you miss? The NEX-7 offers pretty much everything I need.
     
  11. NkedFatWhiteGuy

    NkedFatWhiteGuy TalkEmount Veteran

    200
    Oct 28, 2013
    Portland, Oregon
    I love the topic here!

    I actually sold my Sony DSLR to move to mirrorless. Because of my existing investment in Sony and Minolta systems, the Nex seemed the logical choice. I love the fact that I can still use my flash gear and my existing lenses with just a small additional investment.

    I agree with Poki that mirrorless is the logical design moving forward; I don't know if I will stick with Sony in the long run, but definitely staying mirrorless!

    Given this, I am *trying* really hard not to over spend although there is a 35 mm 1.8 and a Zeiss 16-70 calling my name...

    Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk
     
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  12. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    My "investment" has been two cheap bodies (C3 at 300€ and 7 at 450€), three Sigma lenses (total 390€) and one used Minolta 3600 hsd flash (70€). Of course lots of non Nex specific stuff but I think that my spending has been excessive as I know I will be using these for a long time.

    I see very little future to SLR format. Cameras are bulky (I can carry a Nex almost like a p&s) and mirror and pentaprism are outdated (expensive to manufacture etc.).

    Only one complaint about the system and that is flashes.
     
  13. quezra

    quezra TalkEmount Top Veteran

    916
    Aug 22, 2012
    It's been a terrible slippery slope for me. When I bought my first serious camera (an enthusiast compact) in about 2008 for $400, I thought that was a crazy amount to spend on a camera (since my cellphone was doing a pretty damn good job I thought). When I spent more than double that 3 years later on my NEX-5N (2 lens kit), I thought that was even crazier. When I bought the 18-200 LE and EVF 4 months later, I thought I was crazy. Then those damn Sigmas were selling for $99 and who could say no to that... Meanwhile, I also discovered super cheap lenses on Ebay that I could get, and if I didn't like them, I found I almost always could sell them off at cost or even a tiny profit. So I went through a dozen of those. Then I got the 50/1.8 thinking I'd sell it off as soon as the 35/1.8 came out. I didn't. When the 35/1.8 came out I couldn't bring myself to part with the 50...

    Well 3 years on, I've probably spent nearly $5,000 on this system... any stuff I've sold I replaced with something else. I should probably clear out my 18-200 for lack of use at the moment now I've gone FF, but you just never know and gaaah...
     
  14. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    And there's no 12-Step program for it !!
     
  15. WT21

    WT21 TalkEmount Top Veteran

    611
    Aug 7, 2011
    If you can avoid it, don't be coerced by the gear crowd and those who buy everything. I've been down that route (turning over about 3 complete systems). It's hard to resist, but unless you have a lot of free cash, I would avoid it. Spend what you need to get the lenses you need. Not much reason to spend more.

    Also, as roundball noted, if you like manual focus, the legacy lens options are affordable, and can be adapted to any system.
     
  16. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    exposure lock, focus lock (without need to press button down)
    fast iso change (without diving into menu)

    you also said "offers pretty much " what would like to have more then? It would be nice to share also your experience.
     
  17. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Umm.. the NEX-7 offers all those things (although the focus lock has to be assigned to the AF/MF button). The ISO can be changed on any NEX camera without going to the menu.

    What I would want in addition? Custom settings which can be saved (i.e. C1, C2 and so on on the virtual mode dial) and a screen/EVF-switch button. Also a "focus-to-infinty"-button could be mighty useful at night and could be done easily with the focus by wire E-Mount lenses, but I guess the demand for that is not high enough.
     
  18. Jazzer

    Jazzer TalkEmount Veteran

    344
    Nov 6, 2012
    New York
    Larry
    Yeah, that is a tough one. As the NEX system is my first interchangeable lens camera system, there is an incredible urge to see how other lenses and systems compare. When I purchased my NEX 6 (which replaced an F3 that I purchased used and resold quickly because I really wanted a built in EVF) I intended to use only the kit lens (or the kit plus the 55-210 if I absolutely needed more reach) for several month to a year or so in order to get familiar with the camera and determine what I felt I needed. Well, I didn't go too crazy, but I did wind up with a few prime lenses, including one Minolta manual lens (a 50mm) and the SEL 35/1.8, which is the best and most expensive of them. It's difficult not to look around and wonder "what if?" or question at what point the gear rather than ones own skills is responsible for those shots that lack vibrant colors, punch or sharpness or that are otherwise poorly focused. The temptation to try something new or to throw some more money at a problem is great.
     
  19. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Speaking only for myself...IMO, unless there is some over-riding high volume need for auto focus for every shot, and unless someone 'needs' auto image stabilization...the auto-everything lenses are a massive amount of unnecessary money, weight, and increased opportunities for mechanical failures / repair costs.

    The NEX-7 sensor size and IQ capability is incredible, as it the focus peaking feature for manual focus.
    So much so that instead of ISO100 being my default setting like back in film days, I use ISO400.
    Mount a Canon FD lens in Aperture Mode...usually start at 5.6 - 8.0 for nature / wildlife shots, and just go shooting.
    Tweak ISO and/or Aperture based on lighting conditions as needed.
    Monopod takes care of 99% of any additional stabilization assistance if its needed at all.
    I couldn't begin to have the inventory of lenses / flexibility I've got if I was buying the auto-everything type lenses.
     
  20. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    so I think in reality we do agree, at least to some extent. Give slightly more buttons even though that would slightly increase body size.