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How do MB affect image quality?

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by ilovenex, Feb 20, 2013.

  1. ilovenex

    ilovenex TalkEmount Regular

    62
    Feb 14, 2013
    Vancouver
    Hi everyone,
    I just recently purchased an NEX 5R and have spent the last week taking photos in numberous settings, in various outdoor places with weather ranging from bright and sunny to cloudy. I have noticed after uploading the images that the MB are between 3MB and 6MB (lowest being 2.73MB and the highest being 7.1MB) with most being in the 3MB range. With my Nikon D90 the MB ranges from high 4MB to 8MB even in auto settings....my question is do the MB affect the image quality when printing? If so, how? If an image is lets say 3.84MB how large can the image be printed without losing huge amounts of the image quality?
    Thanks so much
     
  2. Grisu_HDH

    Grisu_HDH TalkEmount Veteran

    397
    Dec 16, 2012
    Southern Germany
    Markus
    The MB of the file just shows how much information is stored in the image itself.
    Quality depends on the pixel settings you have set in your camera.
    So if you don't have to save space on your SD card always use the full 16.1 MP with the 5R!
     
  3. ilovenex

    ilovenex TalkEmount Regular

    62
    Feb 14, 2013
    Vancouver
    Thank you so much for your response! I am very new to this and very inexperienced with the new camera....where do I go on the camera to check the pixel settings that are currently on there?
    Thanks again :)
     
  4. Grisu_HDH

    Grisu_HDH TalkEmount Veteran

    397
    Dec 16, 2012
    Southern Germany
    Markus
    There should be a menu called "Image Size".
    Set the settings in the area "Still" as follows (I have a 5N but I think menu will be the same):
    - L: 16M
    - 3:2
    - Fine
     
  5. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    The MB (not MP) of the Photos is still different from photo to photo though. The reason for this is JPEGs are compressed, so if there are less "different" colors in a shot than in another one, it will simply use the surrounding information to fill the shot, which is why a shot of a blue sky, for example, needs less storage than a shot of a complex landscape.
     
  6. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    JPEG is a lossy image compression scheme so if you have exactly same image that has two versions, one compressed to 1 MB and one compressed to 3 MB the first one does have less information (detail, colors) but the amount still almost same. There are no good rules about image compression levels, you just have to experiment. A4, 300 DPI (Dots Per Inch) and 24 (8 bits of red, green and blue) bit color is about 24 MB in size. Variations in JPEG image file sizes produced by camera are affected by many things, scene, lightning, lens and so on. Camera manufacturers have put lots of effort determining how much to compress images. Don't worry, all is probably ok.

    It depends largely about intended use. Uploading to net doesn't need very good quality, huge prints need much more.

    The worst part about JPEG is that is is 8 (or rather 3*8) bit format and camera determines what part of sensors information is taken. Sensors have about 12-14 bits of light sensitivity so one third of information is discarded always. Despite that results are very good.