Hello everybody

Discussion in 'Welcomes and Introductions' started by CJScott, Sep 1, 2015.

  1. CJScott

    CJScott TalkEmount Regular

    44
    Jul 15, 2015
    Clarkston, MI
    Carlos Scott
    Hi, my name is Carlos. I am new to photography, though I have always been interested in the subject, particularly the intersection of art and science, form and function. New hobbies are my hobby according to my girlfriend, but when I find something I like, I jump in all the way.
    My current system was bought on impulse. Secondipity had the a5100 body and the two kit lenses for $400 refurbished. I could not pass it up.
    After getting a couple of native primes, I discovered adapted vintage/legacy lenses. When I bought the camera, I had no idea what focus peaking was, or how easy it is to adapt old lenses. Since I am so new, I also do not know what kind of photography I would like to pursue. Vintage adapted lenses have afforded me the ability to try different aspects of photography without breaking the bank and incur the wrath of the girlfriend.
    In retrospect, I half regret getting the a5100 over the a6000 since secondipity also had the a6000 body only for the same price as the kit I bought. Overall, however, I am very content with the a5100.
     
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  2. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Enjoy and welcome.

    Resale prices are pretty solid if you desire to change to the A6000.
     
  3. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    Welcome from me too and have fun ;)
     
  4. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Yes, welcome Carlos. And don't worry about having "settled" for the A5100. If you're anything like most of us here, you'll be pulling out your wallet to buy the next camera body soon enough. :laugh:
     
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  5. CJScott

    CJScott TalkEmount Regular

    44
    Jul 15, 2015
    Clarkston, MI
    Carlos Scott
    Thank you all for the warm welcomes. To my own disbelief, I started looking into getting an a6000, though it's really just to look and see what's out there. If i can find something on eBay for less than $300 I'll probably pull the trigger, but I won't be holding my breath. I figure the a5100 is a good starter body that I can at least learn what I like and I don't really think of it as a clutch; it's a rather capable body, with no current limitations for me.
    Hopefully, by the time the successor of the a6000, I will have learnt enough to be able to use it.
    Anyway, thanks again everybody. This forum seems like a generally happy, agreeable bunch. I think I'll stick around :2thumbs:
     
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  6. SpaceManSpiff

    SpaceManSpiff TalkEmount Top Veteran

    547
    Dec 13, 2013
    Tucson, AZ
    Eric
    Welcome Carlos! Try all kinds of photography -- IMO it's a good way not to get stuck in a rut and keeps more creative avenues open. Ah yes, the vintage lenses...it's a GAS GAS GAS. :drinks:

    If/when you decide to upgrade the body --I found that having an EVF was greatly helped me take better pictures (I could see the image better in bright sun, I held the camera in a more stable position, for some reason I was more careful with settings and composition when looking through the EVF)...but I don't think that I would upgrade to an a6000 for that reason alone (but the couple of dials and customizable buttons certainly would come in handy....:daz:)
     
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  7. CJScott

    CJScott TalkEmount Regular

    44
    Jul 15, 2015
    Clarkston, MI
    Carlos Scott
    Well, since were somewhat on the subject.
    What are your guy's opinions of DXO scores?
    I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around a couple of different scores, like the ones posted for the a5100 body versus the a6000. How is it that two bodies with the same sensor score differently? Or, the two scores given for the Sigma f/2.8 lenses, DN E vs DN A?
     
  8. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Opinions on the relevance of DxO scores vary widely. Personally I completely ignore DxO's lens evaluations, the only thing I really believe about lenses are full-resolution samples from others (preferably raws like Amin here supplies in his reviews :2thumbs:). And you always have to bear in mind that lenses have sample variations so anyone else's excellent results don't guarantee that you'll enjoy the same performance. As soon as I'm after a lens and I see image samples that look good enough for me, I go after a good copy myself and that means testing before buying, be it a store sample or a used one.

    I also never read DxO camera reviews but I look at their sensor graphs. Not the scores because they are a coarse measure of sensor performance and the score is built up by relative weighting of various sensor characteristics which may or may not apply to your situation; they certainly are fairly meaningless for the way I use a camera. I look at the graphs instead and always compare to the camera I have myself, just to know if another camera (think A7RM2 at the moment) would have benefits over my present camera (A7). For instance, in the comparison between the A7 and A7RM2 it is easily seen that the A7RM2 offers almost a stop higher ISO for the same signal-to-noise ration and dynamic range.
     
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  9. robbie36

    robbie36 TalkEmount Veteran

    489
    Nov 21, 2014
    Wow.... the curse of internet hardware forums....

    Post 1. I am content with my camera
    Post 2. Well... perhaps I should sell it and buy a different camera
    Post 3. DXO scores

    Just 3 posts to go from contentment to finding the site that can give you reason never to be happy again!
     
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  10. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Aug 6, 2011
    I like DxOmark for sensors, but it takes some time to learn how to read them. The jist of it is to compare the curves (not the final scores) in print mode, and if they look to be not much different, then the differences are not significant. I don't find DxOmark lens testing to be very useful at all.
     
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  11. SpaceManSpiff

    SpaceManSpiff TalkEmount Top Veteran

    547
    Dec 13, 2013
    Tucson, AZ
    Eric
    Despite often being quoted as gospel (especially over at some other forums) , I take DXO tests with a BIG grain of salt. I could go crazy getting lost in the minutae of the sensor scores.

    As a scientist, I find it annoying that their testing methods are not transparent (and would they be repeatable by others?). I don't find that assigning definitive scores to lenses is very helpful when there can be a lot of sample variation between different copies of the same lens (which could very well explain the difference between their testing of the Sigma 30 f/2.8 DN E and DN Art lens. That lens was supposedly updated with better build quality but without altering the optics). For lenses, I look at a lot of samples --and let my eyes decide.

    Similar to Ad and Amin, I use the DXO sensor curves --comparing my camera to the new Sony wundercamera ofthemonth. It was useful for me (for example) to discover that there wouldn't be a big benefit for me to upgrade to the a6000 from my NEX-6 for improved high-ISO performance. And besides, it is cameras we are using and not just sensors. For me, having a comfortable grip, a good EVF, durable build, ease of manual focusing, is more important than a couple of DXO sensor score points.

    RE: the difference between your a5100 and the a6000 sensor scores. Is there a difference? Yes. But, is it significant? Given the two different price points of the cameras, perhaps the a6000 gets higher quality components that affect performance. Or perhaps, the slightly smaller body of the a5100 doesn't dissipate heat as well as the a6000.
     
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