Got film?

Discussion in 'Other Systems' started by TonyTurley, Apr 27, 2015.

  1. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    I'm currently running a roll of expired Kodak Gold 200 through this setup. I haven't used film in around 20 years, and it is kind of cool returning to my roots. This camera is an early version without a meter, so I've either been using Sunny 16, or using my E-M5 to meter. That may not be entirely accurate, but it is fun.

    TT

    Pen F.
     
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  2. jai

    jai TalkEmount Top Veteran

    589
    Feb 4, 2013
    Nice!

    Gotta love those old metal lens caps.
     
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  3. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Indeed.
     
  4. Zanner

    Zanner TalkEmount Veteran

    395
    Aug 19, 2013
    Wisconsin, USA
    Suzanne
    I just sold my Nikon N65 in a garage sale last summer and immediately regretted it when I saw it walk down the driveway. I should have hung onto it.
     
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  5. Yves Gajardo

    Yves Gajardo TalkEmount Veteran

    269
    Aug 7, 2011
    Pittsburg, CA
    Yves
    Post your pics after you are done with your roll!! I want to start shooting film again. It's been too long.
     
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  6. jai

    jai TalkEmount Top Veteran

    589
    Feb 4, 2013
    I'm interested to see what kind of image you get out of it. That's a half frame camera right? Pretty Lo-fi
     
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  7. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Yep, 72 vertical frames. I'll post some after they're developed and scanned.

    TT
     
  8. AlwaysOnAuto

    AlwaysOnAuto TalkEmount Top Veteran

    723
    Feb 17, 2015
    When I retired after being laid off a couple of years ago, I decided it was high time I dig out all my old cameras that I'd managed to collect over the years. I was surprised to see how many I'd actually accumulated over the past three or so decades. I put film thru one of 'em and decided I really liked what old glass does for a photo so saved up for a Nex-7. Film doesn't give me the 'instant' gratification digital does and I couldn't afford it anyways. Now I'm wondering if I should 'move some cheese' and sell off a few so I can afford an A7. Something tells me I should just get some more old glass though.
    Picture 27 (Small).
     
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  9. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    The price of a used A7 has dropped quite a bit. I've seen several that were less than $800. I typically buy used, and have gotten some really good camera deals through the years.

    TT

    PS: I'm going to show my wife your photo so she will stop giving me the stink eye when she looks at my modest collection.
     
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  10. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    If you like old glass the decision A7 or NEX-7 is a no-brainer IMHO: get the A7! It functions so much better with old glass than any APS-C camera. It was one of the reasons for me to get an A7 and I'm glad I did; my NEX-6 was hardly touched after that.
     
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  11. AlwaysOnAuto

    AlwaysOnAuto TalkEmount Top Veteran

    723
    Feb 17, 2015
    ^^^ I really wish you hadn't said that Ad. :biggrin:
     
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  12. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    The Pen F experiment seems to have been a failure. The film pulled free from the canister and is wound around the advance spindle. I never felt any resistance to advancing the film, but I did notice about 2/3 through the film counter that the rewind handle stopped turning. Who knows how many - if any - exposures are on the film. I suppose I could shut myself in a closet, unwind the film from the spindle, and put it into a film storage canister, but I don't know if there is any hope of salvaging anything from the roll. Thoughts?

    TT
     
  13. AlwaysOnAuto

    AlwaysOnAuto TalkEmount Top Veteran

    723
    Feb 17, 2015
    As long as the film hasn't been exposed to light after taking the pictures, it should be OK.
    Worth a try in my book if you've already budgeted for developing the film anyways.
    What have you got to loose?
    You might end up with some useable pictures.
     
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  14. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex
    Hi Addie,
    what do you mean the A7 works better with old glass? Better in what sense?
    Alex
     
  15. jai

    jai TalkEmount Top Veteran

    589
    Feb 4, 2013
    I once opened a camera back up with film still inside, quickly realised my mistake, and shut the camera again. I dreaded developing it (they were my sister's photos) but to my surprise, only the last two or three photos were ruined. The film that was wrapped around the advance spindle was exposed to light around the sprocket holes, but not ruined. So if you were quick to close the camera again, the photos might still be there.

    However, your problem is a little more complicated! Because just getting it in to a film storage container might not be enough. A C41 lab typically doesn't process film in a dark room, they do it by feeding out from the film cassette:

    http://petapixel.com/2013/01/07/a-b...-35mm-film-is-developed-and-printed-at-a-lab/

    I think the best thing to try is get the film back in a cassette. Get a cheap second roll of film, and pull it all out. Cut off all but a bit at the end, so you have got a bit left to attach it to your Kodak Gold.

    Wait till night, get in a closet, and make sure its proper pitch black. Open up the camera, take the Kodak Gold cassette out from its slot, and swap with the cheapo. Splice the exposed film together with the cheap film with some sticky tape. Then close the camera and rewind it all back into the cheapo film cassette.

    That's my plan. I've never tried anything like it, but it might be worth a shot.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2015
  16. jai

    jai TalkEmount Top Veteran

    589
    Feb 4, 2013
    Does that make sense? I edited it a bunch of times because I was confused about which part is called a film canister, and which is apparently actually called a film cassette.
     
  17. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    That does make sense. Thanks for the suggestion. I'm going to contact the company I used to develop my last couple rolls of film and see what they suggest, as well.

    TT
     
  18. AlwaysOnAuto

    AlwaysOnAuto TalkEmount Top Veteran

    723
    Feb 17, 2015

    Alex, I would presume that Addie is referring to the lack of a crop factor when it comes to using the legacy glass on the A7 vs the Nex 7. I find that is the one thing I fight more than anything else when using my old lenses. I can't back up far enough for some of them to work. The crop factor makes them too long.
     
  19. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    Well put, with the A7 you can forget about the crop factor which is especially interesting for legacy wide-angle lenses: a 17mm on the A7 is a superwide and on the NEX-6 it's just a wide-angle lens. That, and also the A7 has larger pixels than any Sony APS-C mirrorless camera so a lens looks better on the A7 in the center area. However, the lens has to cover a larger sensor so it depends very much on the lens if edge and corner performance are satisfactory.
     
  20. jai

    jai TalkEmount Top Veteran

    589
    Feb 4, 2013
    If that works, or they have a better idea, we should post it up on the film forum