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Fungus inside lens - recommendation for cleaning service sought

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Armanius, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. Armanius

    Armanius TalkEmount Regular

    188
    Aug 8, 2011
    Houston Texas USA
    Anyone knows of any photo gear place that does a good job cleaning fungus inside a lens? My dad has an old Pana-Leica 14-50mm f/2.8-3.5 which has a fungus spot growing inside the lens.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Jefenator

    Jefenator TalkEmount Top Veteran

    876
    Nov 23, 2012
    Oregon, USA
    Jeff
    http://www.focalpointlens.com/fp_intro.html

    These guys did a great job on my old Canon 55/1.2. That repair cost about $200 but the front element now looks immaculate (where it once was super funky).

    A nice blast of UV might at least kill the mold and keep it from spreading.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Armanius

    Armanius TalkEmount Regular

    188
    Aug 8, 2011
    Houston Texas USA
    Thanks Jeff!!
     
  4. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder TalkEmount Veteran

    297
    Feb 7, 2012
    Are you sure it's fungus? A lot of things I used to think were fungus, turned out not to be.

    Just keep it dry and the mold won't spread. Fungus spores are everywhere. Even if you could sterilize the entire lens, it would get fungus spores immediately after you exposed it to air.
     
  5. alaios

    alaios TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2013
    Düsseldorf
    Alex

    nice thread. if also other can share information on lens cleaning.

    Alex
     
  6. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Some say setting it out in the direct sun for a couple of hours works.

    I've never had a fungused lens myself, just repeating things I have heard work.
     
  7. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder TalkEmount Veteran

    297
    Feb 7, 2012
    That may work but not for the reasons people say it does. The reasoning is that UV from sunlight will "kill" the fungus. If it does anything, it would deactivate the fungus so that it couldn't reproduce. The existing fungus would still be there. The problem is that glass is a very good UV filter. Very good. So there's not much UV getting into a lens through the glass or body. So other than killing any on the surface, it's not going to help. Leaving it in the sun may kill the fungus if you live in a very sunny area and it's very hot. It's the heat that kills it, not UV. That would also explain why some people say the fungus goes away after being in the sun for hours/days. If it was simply killed by UV, the dead fungus should still be there. If it was killed by heat, the heat would dry out the fungus causing it to shrink or even flake off as powder.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    I have thought according to same lines myself. There is one problem with heat. It will liquidate helicoid grease and it can run to lenses or aperture blades.

    I have seen a couple of lenses where the "fungus" was fungus but in many cases it has to be something else. I suspect the helicoid grease as these lenses didn't respond to water, ammonia or isopropyl alcohol but were removed with lighter fluid, hand cream or acetone (that is with fat solvents).

    Those lenses which have had fungus growing (or I think so) have had tiny threads growing from perimeter of spot and have been easy to clean (water wash with a drop of ammonia and isopropyl alcohol and 5 minutes in ultrasound cleaner, final wash with pure isopropyl alcohol).
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder TalkEmount Veteran

    297
    Feb 7, 2012
    Exactly. I found that about 75% of my fungus lenses didn't have fungus but grease. It was grease that had evaporated and condensed on the lens. The hallmark are these pretty uniformed spaced little spots everywhere. After I opened it up to clean, it was clearly oil/grease. Another 15% are so was not fungus but lens separation. This is easy to mistake for fungus. The tell is that it won't come off. It's between the lens elements, not on them. The remaining 10% was indeed fungus. I just wipe it off with some alcohol.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. Armanius

    Armanius TalkEmount Regular

    188
    Aug 8, 2011
    Houston Texas USA
    I don't know if it's a fungus or not. My dad's lens, and I haven't even seen it yet. I'll check into that before sending it out.
     
  11. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Great info, learned something today