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Frogs and Toads

Thad E Ginathom

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Mar 31, 2019
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439
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This time, toads...

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Lost exif! a6500, Tamron 17-70, Godox TT350s

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Lost exif! a6500, Tamron 17-70, Godox TT350s

This little one, out waiting for dinner, is also being dinner for the mosquito on its hind leg. It was dark: I had no idea that that mossie was there when I took the photo.
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ILCE-6500    E 17-70mm F2.8 B070    37mm    f/3.5    1/60s    ISO 400
 
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Thad E Ginathom

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Folks, here is something that I just don't get. Those pictures were taken outside the house at night, in very low light. The small Godox flash was angled up about 45 degrees, with its small diffuser fitted. It was attached to the camera, which is, as I have no trigger, the only way I can use it.

Obviously, I want the subject lit and nicely visible. But I'd love to also convey the fact that it is night time, not mid-afternoon.

Can that be done with one camera one flash? How?

(disclosure: I confess I did not google for how to make my flash photo of a toad lool like it was taken at night ;) )
 

davect01

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davect01

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Folks, here is something that I just don't get. Those pictures were taken outside the house at night, in very low light. The small Godox flash was angled up about 45 degrees, with its small diffuser fitted. It was attached to the camera, which is, as I have no trigger, the only way I can use it.

Obviously, I want the subject lit and nicely visible. But I'd love to also convey the fact that it is night time, not mid-afternoon.

Can that be done with one camera one flash? How?

(disclosure: I confess I did not google for how to make my flash photo of a toad lool like it was taken at night ;) )
A flash spreads light everywhere, thus making it often look like daytime. Not great for what you are trying to do but very useful most of the time.

A few thoughts. I am in no way an aux light expert but here you go.

1- Get ya an f1.8 or greater lens. Then you probably would not even need the flash depending on how dark it is out there. It is amazing how much light some of these lenses can pick up.

Looking at the one photo you took with EXIF, you have a f2.8 capable lens and did not fully utilize it. The EXIF shows using f3.5. I'm not sure on that lens if that is the best you can get at that 37mm as some lenses start reducing the useful ISO when you start zooming. Only using ISO 400. You have plenty of ISO range to use. ISO 1600 is fully useable on the A6500 without gaining too much grain.

2- A spot light versus a flash. This way you can focus the light directly on the subject and not the entire scene.

3- Shotting in RAW and getting a great Photo editor can allow you to bring up the light on a subject or dim the background.
 
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Thad E Ginathom

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Messages
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1- Get ya an f1.8 or greater lens.
Have got. Have been using that Tamron 17-70 as my always-on-the-camera since I got it. They seem to like that spot (if I haven't put them off it!) and will try my 85/1.8 and 35/1.4.
Looking at the one photo you took with EXIF, you have a f2.8 capable lens and did not fully utilize it.
Mystery of the missing exif! Was stopped down to get the depth of field. And I still missed focus-on-the-eyes in some of the rejects.
2- A spot light versus a flash.
Could try a simple torch. Or experiment with "zooming" the flash.
3- Shotting in RAW and getting a great Photo editor
This time I did! These were post-processed in Rawtherapee. The mosquito toad even has a graduated filter as the masonry above it came out very bright.

This is a Linux house, so my tools are Gimp and Rawtherapee. I usually can't do better than camera jpeg in Rawtherapee: these came out relatively well, but the ISO was lower than my usual photography.

Thanks very much for the suggestions!
 

Thad E Ginathom

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Messages
439
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No tripod: this is gun and run in toadland! I think I had a carport light on yesterday. Today was too dark to even focus without a torch. Torchlight was as bad as flash --- and no, the flash won't "zoom in." Well, it does, because that's part of its functionality, but not in any visual way.
 

bdbits

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Just a wild idea from the brain of a non-flash-using amateur: if you can perhaps get the flash off-camera and off to one side. My thought is to keep the light from bouncing off the background objects, letting them drop into shadow, while still bouncing light off your subject. No idea if this will work, but it is what found its way into my head.
 

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