DRO Bracketing - Does it make sense?

lew

TalkEmount Rookie
Joined
Jul 7, 2014
Messages
23
If DRO means that dynamic range is optimized, what sense does dro bracketing make? Three images, 1 less than optimal, 2 optimal, 3 more than optimal. If DRO covers the full dynamic range of the sensor, it can't get better by bracketing. Right?
 

dbmiller

TalkEmount All-Pro
Joined
Mar 2, 2012
Messages
1,026
Location
New England
Auto HDR does it in camera, and you get what the camera gives you. If you bracket yourself, you can have much more control over the processed image. You can adjust shadows and highlights to suit what you think looks best.
 

bdbits

TalkEmount Hall of Famer
Joined
Sep 10, 2015
Messages
2,029
Real Name
Bob
I am not positivie, but I think the DRO setting gets more "agressive" with higher values. This could introduce more noise in exchange for more dynamic range. Bracketing would then let you choose how much noise you are willing to accept afterwards. I think.
 

dbmiller

TalkEmount All-Pro
Joined
Mar 2, 2012
Messages
1,026
Location
New England
Auto HDR mode also doesn't know what to do with movement in the scene. So you might get some ghosting. Manually, you can decide how to handle such a situation.

I also can't remember if all the RAW's are saved with Auto-DR, or do you have to be in JPG mode. If the latter, it kind of defeats the purpose since you are limiting yourself to 8-bit values. Manual HDR via photoshop can process the data into 32-bits per channel, which you probably have to reduce to 16-bit (or 8, ugh) for printing.
 

Richard Crowe

TalkEmount Veteran
Joined
Sep 14, 2018
Messages
428
I am not a great fan of letting the camera do for me what I can do better in post processing. However, for quickie shots that really don't matter a great deal, DRO can be fine...
 

Kirkp

TalkEmount Regular
Joined
Nov 2, 2014
Messages
174
HDR captures three (or more) images and remaps the extended dynamic range into a single image. The term HDR is a bit misleading as it actually reduces dynamic range of a high contrast scene.

DRO works on a single image, remapping the shadow and highlight regions toward the midrange to bring out more detail in those areas.

I don’t use DRO, but I occasionally use in-camera HDR for still scenes where I can capture the image with and without HDR, and perhaps with various settings for it. I’m sometimes pleased with the result. Without HDR the highlights of this image were nearly blown out, and the shadows were nearly black.

FD5B8F81-5289-48B1-AE7D-76514EA44286.jpeg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
TalkEmount is a fan site and not associated with Sony Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2011-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom