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Couple macro shots with the minolta 100mm/4

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by dshin525, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. dshin525

    dshin525 TalkEmount Regular

    67
    Jan 4, 2013
    Just got this lens a couple days ago to compliment my other macro lens (minolta 50/3.5). Wanted something with a longer working distance and it definitely helps when trying to shoot bugs. Please excuse focus not being spot on...they were both shot handheld and with some breeze.


    _DSC2732 by dcshin525, on Flickr


    _DSC2728 by dcshin525, on Flickr
     
  2. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Not the clearest I have seen, but still pretty good.
     
  3. dshin525

    dshin525 TalkEmount Regular

    67
    Jan 4, 2013
    For sure. I'm practicing constantly trying to get the focus down. Trying to nail the focus is the most difficult part...since I dont use a flash or tripod.
     
  4. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    Nice work!!! Especially #1 :thumbup:
     
  5. sleekdigital

    sleekdigital TalkEmount Regular

    135
    May 7, 2013
    Totally. Are these around 1:1 ? At high magnification, a slight gentle breeze and suddenly your subject appears to be moving all over the place at high speeds. I'm anxiously awaiting a Cosina 100mm macro that should get here tomorrow.
     
  6. dshin525

    dshin525 TalkEmount Regular

    67
    Jan 4, 2013
    yes they are 1:1...slight cropping as well.
     
  7. dshin525

    dshin525 TalkEmount Regular

    67
    Jan 4, 2013
    Here's a couple more from today. The 1st one is my best I feel...conditions were perfect (great light, no breeze) which allowed me to nail the focus.

    _DSC2741 - Version 2 by dcshin525, on Flickr


    This one kinda creeps me out. These tiny things wasn't really visible to the naked eye.

    _DSC2747 by dcshin525, on Flickr
     
  8. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Cool. If I remember correctly from college biology, those are aphids, and the winged thing is an ant "milking" one of them.

    Tony
     
  9. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Insecst are so interesting! No matter what they do, it always seems fascinating. :)

    Just two questions: First, why don't you use a tripod or a monopod? It would make your work so much easier for you. And second: Either clean you sensor or remove them in post, but you have quite a few dust spots there.
     
  10. sleekdigital

    sleekdigital TalkEmount Regular

    135
    May 7, 2013
    I'm not the OP, but I understand the desire to avoid a tripod/monopod.

    1. It's a pain to lug it around.
    2. By the time you get the camera in position, the bug you were after is no longer there.
    3. You need to spend a good bit of money, because the tripod needs to be quite good and you pretty much need to have focus rails or bellows for this type of work... More money and more stuff to carry around.

    I understand the advantages also, and I know many have great success with a tripod/monopod. But it's not for everyone in every situation.

    I do want to try the tripod approach, but the above things are holding me back. Someday I'll probably bite the bullet and buy a good tripod. Then I just need to get my but out of bed really early while the bugs are still slow and sedated :)
     
  11. dshin525

    dshin525 TalkEmount Regular

    67
    Jan 4, 2013
    Like Sleekdigital stated, its a pain to set it up, only to have the bug fly away.
    For stationary things, I would definitely use one. I just have to keep working on keeping still!

    And dust spots? I never noticed them. My Nex 6 is just over a month old...perhaps I should take a closer look at the sensor. Or perhaps its the lens.
     
  12. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    1. That's why I recommend travel tripods. The Sirui T-005X or T-025X are really great - and weigh less than a kilogram.
    2. That's why for faster insects, a monopod would be preferable.
    3. The Sirui T-005X costs only a hundred bucks, and the quality is incredible. Much better than something like a Manfrotto MKC. Focus rails? On a tripod, maybe. On a monopod? No.

    I'd say it's worth to have one, and if it's just for the photos of stationary things you take. The mentioned Sirui can fold as small as 32 cm, is light and extremely cheap for the quality it has. Or get a good monopod - cheaper, lighter, faster to set up.

    But maybe I'm just spoiled because I take almost no picture without a tripod. I agree that it may not be beneficial for everyone.


    That's why I mentioned a Monopod. No real need to set up, fast to adjust (even without focus rails) and gives you that much more stability - especially for focusing.

    If the lens is not as dirty as a filter fallen directly into mud, it's the sensor.
     
  13. dshin525

    dshin525 TalkEmount Regular

    67
    Jan 4, 2013
    i just checked the sensor and couldnt see anything obvious. I gave it a good blow with the rocket blower. will keep my eye on future pics.
    and the sirui...looks like that will be my next purchase!
     
  14. sleekdigital

    sleekdigital TalkEmount Regular

    135
    May 7, 2013
    Why maybe on a tripod... what else would you put focus rails on? :)
    Have you tried doing macro work on a tripod? Generally, you move the camera itself to get the fine focus. I think something like focus rails or bellows (something to provide fine focus adjustment) are pretty much a must if you are going to use a tripod for anything near 1:1 or more.

    No matter how light weight a tripod is, it is still one more thing to carry around and It's much more difficult to get the camera in the right position. That said, the Sirui T-005X has been on my Amazon wish list for a few weeks already :) I think I might need different type of head tho.

    Using a monopod sounds interesting, but I haven't seen many people using these for insect macro work. From what I've seen most people are either going hand held with crazy flash setups, or tripods with something like focus rails to get fine focus adjustments, or even tripods, focus rails AND crazy flash setups.

    No, obviously you wouldn't put focus rails on a monopod, I specifically said tripod there.
     
  15. Hypocaffeinic

    Hypocaffeinic TalkEmount Regular

    53
    Jun 16, 2013
    Qld, Australia
    I find a monopod (or using my tripod as one) is best for snapping bugs; you can get much closer and it's enormously more manoeuvrable. Great shots! Shame about the dust.
     
  16. dshin525

    dshin525 TalkEmount Regular

    67
    Jan 4, 2013
  17. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Those are awesome!
     
  18. dshin525

    dshin525 TalkEmount Regular

    67
    Jan 4, 2013
    thanks!
     
  19. freddytto

    freddytto TalkEmount All-Pro

    Dec 2, 2011
    Puebla, Mexico
    i agree, welldone :)
     
  20. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    same here :thumbup: