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Cheap but good off camera flash setup for a6000

Discussion in 'Lighting Forum' started by Badboy, Jan 11, 2015.

  1. Badboy

    Badboy TalkEmount Rookie

    22
    Dec 24, 2014
    I wanted a decent cost efficient off camera flash setup.

    Been experimenting with my new setup today, three yn 560 iv and a yn 560 tx mounted on the camera. This gives fun manual control over all the flashes. Combined with some basic stands and light modifiers the complete setup was just over £200.

    Been very impressed so far and looking forward to experimenting further.
     
  2. jamesbarner

    jamesbarner New to TalkEmount

    2
    Jan 21, 2015
    How is the color balance? Also, all the ttl is disabled?
     
  3. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    No TTL and probably some variation of color temperature but I think that it won't matter. No HSS either and that may matter.

    I don't know how useful TTL is with multiple flashes but I doubt that it is worth the more than 1000 euro difference between 3*YN-560 III or IV + YN-560 TX and 4*HLV-F43M. Phottix Odin TTL transmitter/receivers and a third party Sony Compatible flashes may be slightly cheaper (Odins about 130 per piece is 550 and 3 Sigma 610 about 600 is total of about 1200).
     
  4. Vincepad

    Vincepad TalkEmount Regular

    165
    Dec 29, 2013
    I've been really happy using my YN 560III and 560TX setup with my a6000 and a7. Great stuff. I manipulate the heck out of my images, so white balance isn't critical for me, though I haven't noticed any major differences in consistency from the YN setup and my traditional studio monoblocs.
     
  5. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    I think (so not sure) that these cheap Chinese flashes have something like 200 C color temperature differences between units. That is pretty high when comparing to brand name units but traditional monoblocs have much more differences. The later ones work by altering voltage so lower power flashes are lower in color temperature and take longer to fire and modern speedlites alter how long the flash is on. I think that later one system is much better. The only disadvantages with with speedlites are limited power and directed light (and there are even now some powerful barebulb speedlites)
     
  6. Badboy

    Badboy TalkEmount Rookie

    22
    Dec 24, 2014
    As other have said this was put forward a cost effective way to get a very capiable flash setup
     
  7. Vincepad

    Vincepad TalkEmount Regular

    165
    Dec 29, 2013
    Did you mean 200K? (I know that 1 degree Kelvin and 1 degree Centigrade are equivalent when measuring physical temperature, but it can confuse the issue when talking about color temperature). I'll assume so.

    Anyhow, I don't disagree with your statement, however, in my personal experience, unless shooting product shots, that variance is minor enough for every day shooting. Heck the variances from shot to shot using actual sunlight as a light source are just as great (if not greater) depending on a multitude of issues. And if the user is going to manipulate color and/or contrast in post, then the color accuracy of the original source becomes a very minor consideration.

    FWIW, my studio used Profoto for years, but I wanted to get out packs and heads so I switched to Elinchrom a few years back, so I'm used to using equipment known for excellent output. Outside of product shooting, I don't see variances that minor as being an issue.

    Everybody has a different need and tolerance.

     
  8. NullMind

    NullMind TalkEmount Regular

    32
    Jan 17, 2015
    I too just got two 560 IV + 560 TX (will add a 3rd), and immediately my problem was with lack of HSS (then again, I was shooting at f/0.95), so on those cases I plan to shoot with a 3 ND filter :D ... That should prevent the need for a shutter faster than 200
     
  9. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    I think that something like 200 K differences are irrelevant even in product shots. Two monoblocs adjusted to different power levels are probably much farther away. The cause for different color temperatures is variance in flash tubes and firing voltage. Old monoblocs used electricity from wall outlets multiplied with adjustable transformer and there are something like 10% variance in that. Typical flash color temperature is 5500 K and 200 K difference is just 4% of it.

    I know a situation where lightning is really critical and that is product quality control.

    I might be interesting to test effects of small differences in color temperatures, that is test when color shift can be seen.