Changsha

Discussion in 'Street and Documentary' started by ChangshaNotes, Aug 27, 2012.

  1. ChangshaNotes

    ChangshaNotes Super Moderator

    Aug 15, 2012
    China
    Colin
    Some images taken with the 5N in Changsha, Hunan, China.

    Soldier

    [​IMG]


    Take a Break

    [​IMG]


    Craftsman

    [​IMG]


    Where to Start

    [​IMG]


    Wheel

    [​IMG]


    All photos were taken with the 18-55mm kit except 'Wheel' which was with the 50mmf1.8.

    I'm new to photography and would appreciate some C&C.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Phoenix

    Phoenix TalkEmount Top Veteran

    859
    Aug 25, 2011
    Melbourne, Australia
    Phoenix Gonzales
    Hi and welcome ChangshaNotes

    Thanks for sharing your images,

    as for c&c, everyone will have their own opinion, personally I would:

    Soldier: I like the image as it is, but I would try to fit in more of his head in the photo to avoid the chopped off headpiece.

    Take a break: Maybe I'll try to take the photo at an eye view level instead of an elevated level.

    Craftsman: I like the image as it is, but I may try to zoom out a bit and use the rule of thirds on the man and use the rule of leading lines on the staircase and bannister.

    Where to start: Streetphotography = Get closer :p

    Wheel : Maybe get more of the cart or wheel in focus

    you dont have to follow any of it, that's just imho ;) , thanks for sharing
     
  3. Dioptrick

    Dioptrick TalkEmount All-Pro

    Feb 4, 2012
    New Zealand
    They are all good pics and are quite advanced for someone 'new' to photography. Thanks for sharing ChangshaNotes, and welcome. :)

    The only one I'll comment on is the Soldier's head. Try to avoid cropping along anatomical joints in the human form (neck, elbow, wrist, etc.). Also it is generally more pleasing to allow more space toward the side of where a person's face is looking. At the moment there is more room at the left of the soldier's head. Try recomposing that same shot with more room on the right, and see if it makes an improvement.

    I'm hoping to visit China again next year... I love your food and your culture! :)
     
  4. ChangshaNotes

    ChangshaNotes Super Moderator

    Aug 15, 2012
    China
    Colin
    Thanks Phoenix. I really appreciate it.

    As I said I'm new. Completely new. It was all mobile phones before and I never bothered to try and learn anything including composition. I really need to learn how to SEE. I don't see the errors right now unless someone points them out to me. So the more criticism I get, the better. Your concise suggestions do that for me. The technical stuff I believe I can pick up. Putting it into practice on the other hand...;)

    I knew that about the wheel picture as I was taking it but I wanted the girl in the red shirt in photo but out of focus and opened the aperture too much.... I have to get faster and more precise. However, I am pleased that what I wanted is what you suggested.
     
  5. Phoenix

    Phoenix TalkEmount Top Veteran

    859
    Aug 25, 2011
    Melbourne, Australia
    Phoenix Gonzales
    That's cool ChanshaNotes, as Dioptrick said they're good pics for someone 'new' to photography :)
     
  6. ChangshaNotes

    ChangshaNotes Super Moderator

    Aug 15, 2012
    China
    Colin
    Thank you Dioptrick.

    What you say about space towards where the person is looking. Would this apply to people moving as well? Like space in front of where they would walk towards?

    Welcome to China but I can't take any credit for the food or culture. I'm a Canadian but have been living here for 9 years.
     
  7. Dioptrick

    Dioptrick TalkEmount All-Pro

    Feb 4, 2012
    New Zealand
    Not just people, but moving objects in general like airplanes or cars. The principle here is when we track a moving object, our natural inclination is to look slightly ahead at the space where we anticipate the object is going to be. Same when a person looks up, the natural inclination is for others around to look up as well. If you apply the compositional "rule of thirds" for a moving object (or for a person's direction of sight), you would place the subject facing towards the 2/3 portion of the frame. This would place the composition in-sync or in balance with viewer's instinct, which projects a sense of advancement or resolution.

    However, the rule can sometimes be broken to introduce a deliberate contra-balance in a composition. A runner for example can be placed to face the very edge of a frame to denote an 'exiting' dynamic, which would project a sense of intrigue or even conflict.

    Wow, you must've seen amazing changes! I've been to China several times before. I hope to visit next time as a tourist... Beijing, to see the Great Wall. :)
     
  8. ChangshaNotes

    ChangshaNotes Super Moderator

    Aug 15, 2012
    China
    Colin
    Cheers Dioptrick.

    Yes, there have been remarkable changes but as someone living here the change that I most notice is inflation. :(