Canon FDn 300 / 4.0-L.....an excellent 'Bird Lens'

Discussion in 'Nature' started by roundball, Sep 20, 2014.

  1. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Saw this nice healthy looking Crow…so I made a slow, quiet stalk to within about 50'.
    ( had to be careful not to rattle any pots & pans sneaking to the kitchen window )
    Eased the lens out through the open window, rested my arms on the window sill.
    Managed to get off a few shots before it's sense of something not right got the best of it.

    Canon FDn 300/4.0-L, NEX-7, Manual Mode, Spot Metering, Daylight WB, ISO400, 1/100, F4.0



     
    • Like Like x 13
  2. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Well done.

    The black is hard to expose properly, nicely done.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    I think three things are responsible for that, at least for the kinds of photos I'm generally after:
    1) Switching to "Manual Mode";
    2) Switching to "Spot Metering";
    3) Switching to "Daylight White Balance"" instead of that "AWB" factory default.

    Especially since no longer using AWB...I'm seeing an overall trend of improvement in my photos since then.
    And it's satisfying to feel myself moving along the learning curve with this NEX-7...it's gradually becoming less of "OK, now, how do I turn this thing on again".......to more of just finding good things to photograph and applying what I'm learning about the hardware / firmware in my hands.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    By the way, for anyone who might be interested...we here in the USA usually think of a Crow as being all solid black.
    But as my fairly close photos in good light show, there is a very slight sort of purple cast to the wing feathers.
    And per this reference, the color of the American Crow is indeed "black glossed with violet"
    ( I guess the violet sheen to their feathers is not readily noticeable at distance )

    INTERNET REFERENCE:
    American Crow - Adult Description
    •Size: 40-53 cm (16-21 in)
    •Wingspan: 85-100 cm (33-39 in)
    •Weight: 316-620 g (11.15-21.89 ounces)
    •Eyes dark brown.
    •Legs black.
    •All feathers black glossed with violet


    http://www.swartzentrover.com/cotor/Photos/Hiking/Birds/BirdPages/AmericanCrow/AmericanCrow.htm
     
  5. chrid

    chrid Super Noob

    807
    May 5, 2014
    australia
    Chris
    the violet sheen sure is beautiful
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Yes, and as big and almost sinister looking as a Crow is, when I studied the close up I realized just how well proportioned / streamlined they are, almost handsome looking.
    And to be clear, I take no credit for specifically exposing for that violet sheen to the feathers...never even saw it 50' away through the lens...just did the best I knew to do for the conditions with various settings in Manual Mode and this was the result.
    I'm assuming "Spot Metering" played a role in the exposure being "spot on"...pun intended.
    :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    And they are supposedly very intelligent.
     
  8. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Extremely...in fact we watched a segment of a special about birds that included some footage of a Crow that had learned to get a small stick from inside of one empty bird feeder, then fly to another bird feeder and reach in with the stick to sweep seeds closer so it could get them...amazing to watch those wheels turning as it studied, then solved the problem
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. José De Bardi

    José De Bardi Assistant in Virtue

    Aug 31, 2013
    Dorset, UK
    José
    People that do crow research have to wear a different mask when trying to catch them every time, they recognise peoples faces after just one encounter, so even after years have passed if a mask previously used is worn then as soon as the researcher approaches they all fly off sounding the danger alarm! Amazing birds!
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    There is very few black birds or flowers there, most are dark blue or violet. Crows are fascinating, almost like humans in many respects.
     
  11. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    I've always liked learning the names given to groups of animals; a "pride" of lions, for example. You may already know this, but a group of crows is called a "murder."
     
    • Like Like x 2
  12. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Yes, I had heard that and thought it was a strange reference.
    Never thought about it anymore until you just mentioned it, and with the advent of information available on the Internet now, I just looked it up.
    Apparently some folklore that associated them with death, dying, morbidity, etc...whenever a flock was seen congregating somewhere, people thought of a pending 'murder'...
     
  13. MizOre

    MizOre TalkEmount Regular

    84
    Jan 18, 2014
    Nicaragua
    I've photographed a Great Tailed Grackle where the light was right and there was the same reflective blue/violet to the color. It's reflection from the feathers, not a pigment, I think.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Yes, I've had Boat Tailed Grackles at feeders over the years too...seem their colors are more varied & pronounced than those of the American Crow...definitely related though...big, raucous, noisy, intimidating...LOL
     
  15. MizOre

    MizOre TalkEmount Regular

    84
    Jan 18, 2014
    Nicaragua
    Different family (Orioles and blackbirds), not Corvids (Jays, Crows, and Ravens). We've got some very big members of this family down here (Oreolopendulas). They do seem to function in the crow niche here ecologically, and starlings haven't colonized Nicaragua the way English Sparrows and Rock Doves (feral pigeons) have.
     
  16. Dan Euritt

    Dan Euritt TalkEmount Regular

    191
    Jan 11, 2014
    that is a clean shot, thx for letting us see what the fdn 300mm is capable of
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Thanks...and just to be clear, wasn't trying to be an authority on the subject, just tossed out a tongue-in-cheek attempt at humor that they're related...given that both birds have such similar traits of being big, raucous, noisy, intimidating, etc.

    Haven't had any Grackles here this year other than a brief visit or 2 back in the spring, then none since...which suits me fine as they usually become a small flock, scaring off the rest of the pretty songbirds we enjoy....but at least they're a prettier than Starlings. Wouldn't mind having a pair of Red-Wing Blackbirds around but only see them out in more open spaces, fields, and so on.