Before and after - The post processing thread

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by Poki, Jul 22, 2013.

  1. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    I think post processing falls a little bit short here in this forum, so here we go with a thread dedicated to post process your images! I think most will agree post processing is just as important as the shooting itself, so I'm curious what you all do to your images before publishing them!

    The rules in short: Post one shot that's directly out of the camera (either RAW or JPEG) without any corrections done, and the finished version directly below. Then explain in a few words what you did to the image in post.

    Commenting on other's post processing (or the images in general) is of course appreciated.

    So here we go:

    DSC02646 - Arbeitskopie 3.

    A Wolfs Night.

    What I did:
    I brightened up the foreground a bit, used a cloud brush on a soft light layer to get the texture on the mountains, I cloned out all the wires, added a second layer with the moon texture (shot with the camera in the same position, only with a shorter shutter speed), copied the background and brought it back as a soft light layer with a layer mask and I added some stars with a white brush. Finally I did the usual dodging, burning, sharpening and some color corrections.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  2. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther TalkEmount Veteran

    473
    Aug 9, 2011
    This thread will thoroughly convince me that I suck at PP...:biggrin:
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Then it's a great point to start experimenting! Once you tried all the tools modern software gives you you'll love trying out what you can do with your images! And you don't need expensive software either - I just use Pixelmator (€14) and Aperture (€65), nothing else.
     
  4. Jazzer

    Jazzer TalkEmount Veteran

    344
    Nov 6, 2012
    New York
    Larry
    That is an astounding transformation. I have no clue yet what I am doing with PP yet, but this has convinced me that I really need to learn.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    Nice thread and amazing shot Poki!!! I don't think I'll ever learn to PP like that...
     
  6. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    If this encourages you to experiment, then that's awesome!

    Really, it's not that difficult. You basically only need one thing - time. It took me about two hours to finish this picture, and in the beginning it might well take you four or more hours, but once you see what can be accomplished with so little tricks it's so much fun! It's all about experimenting.
     
  7. jereswinnen

    jereswinnen TalkEmount Regular

    69
    Jul 11, 2013
    Belgium
    Jeremy Swinnen
    I'm interested to hear your reasoning on why you went with Aperture instead of Lightroom.
     
  8. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    I simply like the management part better in Aperture. Most of my editing is done using Pixelmator, and the things I do in Aperture are things it does really well - sharpening, color-toning (Aperture has sooo many tools for color management, and they're all awesome!), dodging, burning and cloning. Sure, Lightroom has many more advanced features, but most of them can be simply done using layers in a software as simple as Pixelmator.
     
  9. Larry

    Larry TalkEmount Regular

    104
    May 23, 2013
    Seattle, WA
    Larry
    Very nice job on the picture. I like it. I don't do a lot of PP because I'm color blind. I'll crop and run a few of the auto features (PS11), maybe tweak the contrast and luminance. I'm interested in trying the clone out process but I'm saving that for the winter time when I'm stuck inside while it's raining here in the Pacific Northwest. But I'll follow this thread to learn what I can. Thanks for starting this thread.

    Larry
     
  10. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Hey Larry,

    do you shoot Black & White? I imagine it being easier to shoot B&W if you're color blind, and you might have a much better eye for striking compositions than somebody who gets distracted by colors. You always have to get the most out of your strengths, and once you see your seemingly disadvantages as advantages for the type of photography you do, you'll exceed pretty much any other one who shoots similiarly.
     
  11. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Ok, I just processed my second photo from last night, and I hope it encourages some of you to post your before & after shots!

    DSC02690 - Arbeitskopie 2.

    Cabin in the wood.

    What I did:
    I cropped it to a 16:9 aspect ratio, added some stars and texture to the sky, brightened up everything individually, sharpened it, added the texture that makes the way to the cabin, cloned out everything I didn't like and finally I added the hexagon barrier (you know the movie 'The cabin in the woods', right?).
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther TalkEmount Veteran

    473
    Aug 9, 2011
    Don't have that much patience or time LoL! :biggrin:
     
  13. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    I'm not a pro and if I'm being honest most of the time I don't know what I'm doing while PP :D
    I just do the small/light editing stuff really which takes me about 2-3min tops for each photo.

    As much as I admire Poki's work :thumbup: I personally think I'd lose the enjoyment in photography if I had to spend 4+ hours for editing one photo (plus working 10 hours a day doesn't really leave much free time :( )

    Having said that, I'm subscribing to this excellent thread cause I want to see and learn from all the pros - carry on ;)
     
  14. jereswinnen

    jereswinnen TalkEmount Regular

    69
    Jul 11, 2013
    Belgium
    Jeremy Swinnen
    Original:

    DSC00485-2.

    Edit:

    DSC00485.

    What I did:

    - Obviously cropped it for a tighter capture;
    - Make it much lighter;
    - Sharpened things a bit up.

    No rocket science, I know ;)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. dsiglin

    dsiglin TalkEmount Veteran

    230
    Apr 23, 2013
    Greenville, SC
    Often I'll do some color adjustments if I convert to B&W. These adjustments are similar to having a colored filter on while shooting b&w. Here's a photo from a recent trip, original fist and then edited. Editing is an aid, in my mind, in the best case scenarios it can "save" a photo that was horribly underexposed, had bad composition, etc. But really it is often just used to add a little extra something to a photo.

    DSC02849-3.
    Pretty badly underexposed. This was shot in raw format.

    DSC02849-2.

    I did a lot of tweaking to this so it's easier for me to post the settings in LR4. Besides the settings you see below I did "burn" the background to make chimney rock pop.
    step1.

    step2.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    DSC02748 - Arbeitskopie 2.

    Eternity.

    What I did: Noise reduction, sharpening, heavy color editing, advanced local burning & dodging, a little bit work with a black brush, added fireflies and the smoke. Finally, I did a full light-blue B&W conversion using Aperture and added 1,3% sepia toning.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. ChangshaNotes

    ChangshaNotes Super Moderator

    Aug 15, 2012
    China
    Colin
    I can't do anything like Poki but I'll share a recent example anyway.

    When I import into Lightroom 5, I auto add a preset that mimics the Landscape setting for in-camera jpeg which is my preferred look. So for me, this is straight out of camera.

    i-V698LDQ-1200x1200. i-Hgm2p4H-1200x1200.


    First I like to use the level tool in Lightroom and crop if necessary. I didn't crop this one. I then make a copy and work.

    With buildings I have a preset I made that's kind of a faux light HDR.

    i-Sh6rZ4r-1200x1200. i-tDf7spH-1200x1200.


    For this shot and the series (The Have Nots), I wanted a more gritty look so I used a mask to brush in clarity and contrast being careful of the brightness in the process.

    i-v4ZxWrD-1200x1200.

    All of the set was processed the same way. The original preset took awhile to figure out but now that I have it, it only takes a few minutes for each photo in the set.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Deadbear77

    Deadbear77 TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Sep 14, 2012
    Northeast Ohio
    Kevin
    Silver Efex
    u9azuheg.
    te5a9u6y.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. suntoryjim

    suntoryjim TalkEmount Regular

    102
    May 17, 2013
    Break in the Clouds 1. Break in the Clouds 2.

    This is pretty standard procedure in LR5: drop the highlights, open the shadows, add contrast and clarity, play with curves to fine-tune the lighting, NR and sharpening, final tweak of temperature. I also use the High CF Huelight color profile, and the lens correction profile for the Sigma 19 F2.8.

    As you can see, there's a lot of info in RAW that is just begging to be let out. ;)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  20. claude

    claude TalkEmount Top Veteran

    585
    Jan 13, 2013
    Ottawa Canada
    Really nice work. Did you find many improvements from LR4?