Beautiful day at the airport

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by TonyTurley, Jul 29, 2013.

  1. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Some local guy with very deep pockets owns a Folland / Hawker-Siddeley Gnat. Must be nice to be able to cruise around in your own 1960s era British pocket jet. I used the Sakar 135/2.5 to be able to get decent pics without cropping, but ended up having trouble tracking the little jet as it accelerated. The G450 just happened to be taxiing as the Gnat was departing. The cityscape pic is a freebie just because our air has been so clear the past couple of days. Low humidity and cool-moderate temperatures are great! Right now it is 76F/24C. :)

    Tony

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  2. claude

    claude TalkEmount Top Veteran

    585
    Jan 13, 2013
    Ottawa Canada
    Looks like you enjoy where you work. Nice pics.
     
  3. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Thanks Claude. The view is great and we get to see some interesting aircraft from time to time.

    Tony
     
  4. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    I got to work this morning to learn that the little red jet crashed about an hour after I took these photos, as the pilot was attempting to land at his destination. It is a somber reminder that as much as we (I) take things for granted, nothing is guaranteed, no matter what our philosophies/belief systems. My prayers and condolences go out for the family of the pilot.

    Tony
     
  5. ChangshaNotes

    ChangshaNotes Super Moderator

    Aug 15, 2012
    China
    Colin
    Oh no Tony, that's terrible news. I think if I had taken those photos I would feel.... I don't know.... strange.
     
  6. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    That's terrible. From another perspective, that means that you probably have the last photos ever taken of the pilot. That is a fairly strong document, stronger than most photos we take on a dailt basis. On a philosophical note, everyone's life is fairly short and uncertain. By the power fof photography, at least most people can leave a personal record of their existence.
     
  7. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Sad news indeed and I echo your condolences and prayers to the family Tony.
     
  8. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Thanks for the comments, guys. Colin, you're right, it does feel strange. Even stranger is that part of my job consists of reviewing the services provided by our facility when something like this happens to ensure we followed all applicable directives. Listening to the voice of a pilot you watched take off - and just died - is unsettling, even after doing it for many years.

    Tony
     
  9. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    While that is sad and unsettling it isn't as bad as being the last person to actually talk to a fallen pilot. :frown:
     
  10. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    I almost had that happen when I was a very young controller. I had taken a radar hand-off on an aircraft coming to our airport in very adverse weather conditions. It was just a few minutes before the end of my shift, and no sooner had I taken the hand-off, when my relief showed up. I found out later I probably hadn't even made it to my car before the plane crashed south of our airport. I have also witnessed several plane crashes, but none were fatal.

    Tony
     
  11. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    That's very sad Tony - what looked like a "beaufitul day" turn out a tragedy :(
     
  12. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    For me it was a flight of F4s that were working offshore doing self-contained gun runs on each other. They left our airspace and never came back. I was a student on approach control and had moved to flight data shortly after they departed. After some time I noticed that they were overdue. Sadly they still are.

    As near as we could reconstruct from radar data they went nose to nose at around 350 knots. However many "saves" I had never quite made up for losing one, even though I really had no hand in the play.
     
  13. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Up until last fall my father (now 83 years old) was tooling around the skies in his Aero Vodochody L-39 Albatros, a very similar jet to that Gnat. Knowing how much he loved flying in it, we all had mixed feelings when he decided to sell it. But at least he came to that decision on his own, and we weren't forced to have that conversation with him.

    I went up with him in it once, when I was still a student pilot. To say that I was impressed is to fall far short of the truth.
     
  14. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    The gentleman flying the Gnat was 79. On a little more positive note, it is interesting that you were/are a pilot and Jim was/is a controller. Small world.

    Tony