APS-C Size Capture...

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by BruPri, Aug 3, 2014.

  1. BruPri

    BruPri TalkEmount Regular

    95
    Aug 7, 2011
    I have an A7 and a few lenses. The only FE lens I have is the FE 1,8/55. My others are Contax used with a Rayqual adapter. I believe the APS-C Size Capture "auto" option only works with by recognizing a Sony or electronically compatible APS-C lens. I was hoping it would work conversely by recognizing FE lenses and switching automatically to anything non-FE.
    So my question is, does anyone know of any tricks or assignable button to quickly switch manually for my adapted lenses?
     
  2. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Switching automatically when not detecting an FE lens doesn't make sense as most lenses you can adapt have a 35mm image circle. The Contax lenses should have one too, so maybe your adapter limits the image circle rather than the lenses.
     
  3. BruPri

    BruPri TalkEmount Regular

    95
    Aug 7, 2011
    I'm getting tiny dark corners with my Sonnar 3,5/100, not with my 2,8/28 using the same adapter. Perhaps it is the Rayqual and I need to try a different one... any thoughts?
     
  4. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    I'm not too well informed on adapters. But all legacy lenses cover at least full frame since the smaller formats didn't exist prior to digital. So yes, getting another adapter is probably the solution. Just look for an adapter that is made for FE mount rather than E-mount and you should be fine.
     
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  5. michelb

    michelb TalkEmount Regular

    198
    Oct 27, 2013
    Greater Montreal area in Quebec, Canada
    Michel Brien
    Are you using a filter or un-adapted lens shade ?

    Is this phenomenon at all apertures on only wide open ?

    If only wide open without any accessories, could be normal vigneting
     
  6. BruPri

    BruPri TalkEmount Regular

    95
    Aug 7, 2011
    Filter ...but same minor vignetting still present when removed, all apertures. I don't believe there is any adapter differentiation for e-mount and FE-mount, I think it's all basic NEX / e-mount on the camera side however is it possible there are different manufacturer tolerances that may contribute to vignetting or not?
     
  7. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    No, there are no tolerances in the camera manufacturing. If the adapter was built prior to the FE mount introduction, it's possible that the design is not optimized for the bigger image circe. Sure, the adapters all state that they're for "E-mount", because that's how the mount is called after all. But there are still differences, so look for one which does say it's compatible to full frame cameras.
     
  8. Hawkman

    Hawkman TalkEmount Top Veteran

    943
    Sep 10, 2013
    Virginia, USA
    Steve
    Uh, I hate to be a know-it-all nitpicker, but what the hey... actually, APS-C does, in fact, predate "mainstream" digital photography. The film system called APS (Advanced Photo System) was developed in the mid-1990s, prior to the development of most widely available consumer digital camera systems available now. It included three formats, H, C, and P, all from the same negative, and the modern APS-C digital image sensor size is based on the C "Classic" aspect ratio format from that film system. While largely a compact, point-and-shoot format, there were even some APS interchangeable lens SLR cameras created for the format using either 35mm lenses or some with IX-series lenses (similar to Nikon's current DX format).
    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Photo_System

    But you are right, by far and away most film lenses were designed for the 35mm 135 film format, and most lens adapters are for 35mm lenses. ;)


    Sent from TalkEmount app on iPad
     
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  9. jai

    jai TalkEmount Top Veteran

    589
    Feb 4, 2013
    What about those little half frame cameras? Like the old Olympus pen. You can't use those lenses to cover full frame, or can you?
     
  10. Poki

    Poki TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Aug 30, 2011
    Austria
    Sure, that's true. But I thought digital sensors were also introduced in the 90's. ;)

    Also, the 35mm "small format" is almost a hundred years old, so I guess most old lenses are designed for that - or a larger - format. Still, there are exceptions, so just check your lens. As for a 100mm Zeiss lens with Contax mount - yes, that should definitely support the full frame image circle.
     
  11. BruPri

    BruPri TalkEmount Regular

    95
    Aug 7, 2011
    It was the Rayqual adapter. Bought a Photodiox that worked perfectly without dark corners
     
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  12. Hawkman

    Hawkman TalkEmount Top Veteran

    943
    Sep 10, 2013
    Virginia, USA
    Steve
    In a way, you are right, the first digital image sensors were made before APS came about. These first CCDs were developed all the way back in the 1970s, with a Kodak engineer (ironically) making the first (cancelled) prototype digital camera in 1975. Before that, the first digital image ever transmitted actually came from the Mariner 4 probe to Mars in 1965.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_photography

    While the first actual digital cameras came out between 1988 and 1990, I was instead referring to "mainstream" or "widely available consumer digital cameras" which didn't take off until the late 1990s and early 2000s.

    I suppose I should have noted one of the other, far older smaller film formats, like 126 film or 110 film. 110 was introduced in 1972 and became very popular in point-and-shoot pocket cameras until the rise of digital compacts in the late 1990s. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/110_film
    While mostly used for relatively poor quality pocket cameras (of which I bought one as a kid), 110 was used in a few SLR cameras, including one from Minolta and one from Pentax. 126 film was even older, dating to 1963.

    Ultimately though, your main point was correct: most interchangeable lenses made in the late film era were designed for 35mm, 135 format film, which has an image circle equivalent to modern "full frame" digital image sensors. My humble nitpicking point was merely that sometimes we forget about the plethora of other film formats that were out there prior to the rise of high quality digital imaging. ;) Film photography has a long and varied history of format after format coming and going.

    So, we are both right! ;)
     
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  13. Deadbear77

    Deadbear77 TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Sep 14, 2012
    Northeast Ohio
    Kevin
    This was shot with the pen 38 1.8 on the 7r abyjeru6.
    You can see the dark edges from being half frame. It crops nice, and very sharp.
    udy4y4ys.
     
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  14. Hawkman

    Hawkman TalkEmount Top Veteran

    943
    Sep 10, 2013
    Virginia, USA
    Steve
    I had forgotten about the half-frame cameras. Didn't really know much about them. My bad.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Half-frame_camera