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aperture setting on manual focus lens- a newbie question

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by Peeam, Feb 15, 2014.

  1. Peeam

    Peeam TalkEmount Rookie

    12
    Jan 28, 2014
    I am looking for your thoughts on aperture setting when using the Vivitar 75-205 mm F/3.8 MC MF Lens with my Nex-3. Focus peaking and manual focus assist work great. I have been using Nex-3 in shutter priority mode and setting the aperture on the lens manually. Does it make sense (?) to use the nex-3 on aperture priority mode and use a standard (widest ?) aperture on the lens ?

    By the way, thanks to the forum, I got the right lens adapter- Fotasy NAPK Pro Pentax PK/K mount Lens to Sony NEX E-Mount. Here are a couple of pictures of the camera with the lens and the adapter taken with my point and shoot canon SX260HS. The lens is heavy and will take some time getting used to it. Once we dig ourselves out of the snow in North east USA, I will post some shots with taken with the lens.

    Regards

    PeeAm
     

    Attached Files:

  2. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    I as well use Shutter Priority.

    As you said, adjust aperture on the lens, shutter on the camera.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    You can use the lens in full manual mode, in shutter priority (as you have been) , or in aperture priority (as I do, unless I'm shooting long exposures). In A mode you set the aperture on the lens and the camera will adjust the shutter speed for you.
     
  4. xXx1

    xXx1 TalkEmount All-Pro

    Jan 15, 2013
    In the old bad days (before P-mode) A-mode was very widely used as was S-mode. Both make sense, when you know you cannot use long exposures you use S-mode and when you need certain aperture A-mode.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. jai

    jai TalkEmount Top Veteran

    589
    Feb 4, 2013
    I tend to use S mode when shooting telephoto.

    Because the camera can't talk to the lens, it won't know your focal length. And at telephoto you will probably require a faster shutter than what it might select in A mode.

    For the best results, you will want to step it down a little from wide open, as this will give you better contrast and sharpness. But not too far, because with a fast shutter speed required, it won't be too hard to push your ISO really high.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. addieleman

    addieleman Passionate amateur

    Nov 13, 2012
    Netherlands
    Ad Dieleman
    S mode with auto ISO and the legacy lens' aperture controlled by a ring is in fact a very convenient way to have exposure set by variation of the sensitivity (ISO) only and have shutter speed and aperture set at a fixed value. Sony got it right by introducing an M mode with auto ISO in the A7(R). This could be a firmware update for other cameras but we know Sony won't easily do that.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  7. jai

    jai TalkEmount Top Veteran

    589
    Feb 4, 2013
    It's funny how so many cameras lack this. Almost as if it is due to M mode snobbery. If you are going M mode you have to go manual all the way or you aren't hardcore enough?
     
  8. Peeam

    Peeam TalkEmount Rookie

    12
    Jan 28, 2014
    Thank you all for the comments. For me, it is now time to play around with different A and S settings.
     

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  9. mingus2112

    mingus2112 TalkEmount Regular

    142
    Jun 16, 2014
    Figured i'd jump in on Peeam's thread rather than creating my own, similar thread. (Search function is my friend!) I've been using my NEX 3N for almost a week and am trying to get a "workflow" down on how to control these things. I don't have the steadiest of hands, so higher shutter speed is almost always needed to "freeze" anything small, moving or far away. I just did a bunch of shots out in the sun with my 28mm f2.8 Monolta Rokkor stopped down to between 5.6 and 8, Aperture Priority and ISO set at 200. Figured i'd see what the camera pulled as my shutter speed. Surprisingly, for shots of buildings and such, I got a lowest shutter speed of 1/130 and the highest was about 1/1600! I'm sure the readings were so varied as it was sometimes reading light off the buildings and sometimes incorrectly exposing for the sky. I'll need to play around with it more. I'll probably go out again this afternoon with my 50mm 3.5 Macro and try the same experiment. Tomorrow, i'll throw it in shutter priority and let it do Auto ISO. It'll be nice to compare shots and see how the camera is compensating!

    -J
     
  10. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    I have that same lens, Peeam. While it is heavy, I've been very pleased with the IQ it gives.

    Tony
     
  11. Hawkman

    Hawkman TalkEmount Top Veteran

    940
    Sep 10, 2013
    Virginia, USA
    Steve
    As I've been learning all this so far, I've now come to what seems a fairly simple process with legacy lenses. If I'm indoors or in low light, I use Shutter priority, set the aperture to 2, 2.8, or 3.5, depending on which MC/MD lens I'm using, and set the shutter speed to 1/100 or 1/125, light permitting. I set ISO to auto and let the camera decide. If it pegs at ISO 3200, I drop shutter speed to 1/60, lens and motion permitting, or find/make more light.

    Outside in good sunlight I switch to Aperture priority, stop down to about f/5.6, and let the camera pick ISO and shutter. That seems to work well for me for most situations so far. I'm not good enough at judging light yet to trust myself with shutter speed in strong sunlight. Will get there though... I hope.



    Sent from TalkEmount app on iPad
     
  12. mingus2112

    mingus2112 TalkEmount Regular

    142
    Jun 16, 2014
    Nor am I. I'm finding more and more that the shutter speed the camera chooses for me outdoors is a little slow. For handheld outdoor shots, i've been setting my shutter speed depending on the lens (equal to the effective focus length) or at LEAST 1/100th for now. The balance of the NEX has been an issue for me and i've been getting mixed results (motion wise).

    -J
     
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  13. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    I've just recently started exploring this aspect of the learning curve on my NEX-7...it is a very workable solution for a lot of situations.
    The down side is if shutter & aperture settings force a higher ISO than I normally would have chosen, then noise can become an issue.

    I like the incredible detail I can get using ISO100 on a birds plumage for example, but constantly using 300 and 400 teles without a tripod I have a good deal of discards that are not tack sharp due to slight movement.
    The flip side is I get them tack sharp using auto ISO while hand holding, but many times get more noise than I like from ISO400 / 800 being auto-selected...but I'll get better at A&S choices with AutoISO as I keep climbing the learning curve...the concept is great.
     
  14. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    BTW, unless I'm overlooking something, when using "Auto-ISO", I can't tell what ISO the camera has actually set...all I see in the viewfinder is the term 'Auto-ISO'.

    And in experimenting with a few more Auto-ISO shots just now, in intensely bright overhead sunlight, I thought about the "sunny 16 rule". Theoretically, if I set A&S in some variation of the "Sunny-16 rule" (1/125 & f16, 1/250 & f11, etc) it should force Auto-ISO to "back into" the appropriate ISO setting or very close to it...ie: ISO100.

    Then in shooting a few shots of some Petunias in this intense light with a 300mm lens at 1/250 & f11, then checking the shots after the fact for the display data, I see the camera chose ISO200...pretty close...and I got pretty decent color & detail with shutter fast enough for the 300 braced on my elbows to work.

     
  15. dbmiller

    dbmiller TalkEmount Top Veteran

    777
    Mar 2, 2012
    New England
    Half-press the shutter to set the exposure, and the display will change from "Auto-ISO" to the selected ISO for the current shot if you fully press the shutter
     
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  16. roundball

    roundball TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Oct 8, 2013
    USA
    Good timing, LOL...I was just coming back to make that correction as I just discovered that a moment ago, thanks.
    There are so many features, capabilities, variations, etc, on the NEX-7 compared to way back in film days on Canon A1's...and I'm thoroughly enjoying getting back into photography with my Canon FD lenses...every few days is another "ahhh...so that's how that works"