adapted lens help

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by fundio, May 6, 2013.

  1. fundio

    fundio TalkEmount Rookie

    19
    Apr 10, 2013
    I know this has been beaten to death but i just want to clarify before i make any purchases of any lenses.

    My question is I'm looking for a decent wide angle lens. The rokinon 8mm is the one in particular but i want to know what mounts will get the black edges because of the sensor size. Can i use m43 like Olympus or any other brand without the black edges? Like the c mount from what i have read are too small for the sensor. Is this correct? I have a few Minolta MD mount lenses and love the manual focusing and for the price they were great to start with.

    Sorry for the basic questions I'm new to photography and am getting hooked and i do not want expensive trial and errors.
     
  2. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Most, if not all m43 lenses will vignette on the NEX I believe. Stick with dslr or rangefinder lenses and you should be good to go (with a couple of weird exceptions).
     
  3. fundio

    fundio TalkEmount Rookie

    19
    Apr 10, 2013
    Thank you for that. That is what i understood from what i read. Thanks for the confirmation. Another question. i have a Minolta 24mm i have seen some ads that say ultra wide 24mm. A 24mm is going to be a 24mm regardless correct?
     
  4. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    I think most people would agree that a rangefinder camera is best represented by the classic Leicas. Their salient features include an optical viewfinder that doesn't provide a view through the lens, like in an SLR. There are rangefinder lenses available that can be used (with an adapter) on NEXes from Leica, Zeiss, Voigtländer, and some others, and many of them are pretty spendy.

    Not correct. The NEX cameras have what is called a 1.5x crop factor, as do all APS-C cameras. So that means that the older, legacy lenses like your Minolta 24mm, which were originally used on 35mm film cameras, are only 24mm on what are known as "full-frame" digital cameras. You need to multiply that 24mm by 1.5 in order to determine the field of view on a NEX. That means that your 24mm would give you the equivalent of a 36mm field of view.

    But if you want to start a free-for-all in some camera forums, just ask about "lens equivalence" in cropped cameras. It can really get the fur flying.

    But not here, thankfully. We're all relatively normal. ;)
     
  5. fundio

    fundio TalkEmount Rookie

    19
    Apr 10, 2013
    Lol. I'm glad i did not catch flack for these questions. I know they are basic but when it comes to finances i do not think any of us like to throw away money. Thanks for the explanation. I did read about the crop factor. I should clarify the 24mm question. No matter the shape of the glass if it is 24mm versus super wide 24mm it will be 24mm minus the crop factor.
     
  6. dbmiller

    dbmiller TalkEmount Top Veteran

    779
    Mar 2, 2012
    New England
    Slightly confusing, I'll admit. In the film days, 24mm was considered ultra wide. By definition, wide-angle lenses differ from ultra wide angle lenses in that the latter have a focal length shorter than the short side of the film or sensor, which means that in 35mm, a wide-angle lens has a focal length between 35 and 24 mm, while an ultra wide-angle lens has a focal length shorter than 24 mm. But as noted, on a crop-factor camera such as the NEX, the sensor is smaller than a frame of film. The area larger than the sensor is "lost" since that light doesn't hit the sensor. And the image is essentially cropped to the area that is the sensor. So a 24mm lens has equivalent field-of-view to a longer lens. For the NEX, that crop factor is 1.5, so if you are used to what a 36mm lens would look like on a film camera, you get that field of view with a 24mm lens.

    The next part of your question regarding black edges depends on the size of the image circle that a lens generates. Since we're usually talking about adapting full-frame film lenses, the image circle more than covers the sensor, so there is no black edge. But a video camera lens, such as a CCTV lens, was only meant to cover a smaller sensor area. And since a micro-4/3 sensor is smaller than the NEX, any lens that gives black edges on m43 will have even more of a black area on the NEX.

    Hope this helps and doesn't confuse you even more.
     
  7. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    Yes, 24mm is 24mm. No matter what label the lens manufacturer decides to slap on it, it's still a 24mm lens.
     
  8. fundio

    fundio TalkEmount Rookie

    19
    Apr 10, 2013
    Thanks for that. It makes perfect sense. The last question i have then is.. Are the e mount lenses actual mm size? Do they compensate for the 1.5 crop factor? Example if i bought the rokinon 7mm e mount would it actually be 7mm versus a cannon mount?
     
  9. fundio

    fundio TalkEmount Rookie

    19
    Apr 10, 2013
    Correction. I meant the 8mm
     
  10. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Well, fisheye lenses are a slightly different kettle of fish. With a fisheye you need to pay attention to two things- 1) what is the diagonal field of view (FOV)?, and 2) what format was the lens originally designed for?

    For example, Rokinon makes the 8mm fisheye for E mount and it is 180° diagonal FOV. Rokinon also makes a 8mm fisheye in Canon mount that is only 167° diagonal FOV. Rokinon also makes what appears to be the same lens in Nikon mount that is 180° diagonal FOV.

    So, a fisheye is a bad example of trying to figure out sensor crop factors. Best to keep it simple. It's not the focal length that changes, it's the FOV. ;)
     
  11. fundio

    fundio TalkEmount Rookie

    19
    Apr 10, 2013
    Ahhhh. I see. That is well put. Thank for that knowledge. Can i ask you, do you use wide angle if so what do you use?
     
  12. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Yes I do. ;)

    I have the Rokinon 8mm/2.8 fisheye, the Voigtlander 12mm/5.6 and the Voigtlander 15mm/4.5 for my wide angle needs. Some day I'll have the Sony 10-18, unless something better comes out first.
     
  13. fundio

    fundio TalkEmount Rookie

    19
    Apr 10, 2013
    Very nice lenses. If you could only pick 1 which would it be. I could not afford all of those.lol
     
  14. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Hmmm... I don't know. lol! I guess i'd go with the fisheye, just because it's the most versatile and may be the sharpest of the three. But then again I'm comfortable with stitching pics from longer lenses to get wider view if necessary, you may not be.

    In which case if I were advising you which one to get I'd say the Sony SEL16F28 (or the new 20) plus the wide angle and fisheye adapters. Use those until you get really comfortable with ultra wide angle shooting & then you can upgrade at that point.
     
  15. fundio

    fundio TalkEmount Rookie

    19
    Apr 10, 2013
    Thanks for the tip. My cousin let me barrow his 16 with fish eye and i loved it. That is why i wanted to get the 8. I thought it would be a better lens with more.what is stitching? And i also shoot in manual mode. I hardly use the other shooting modes. I'm sure I'm not using the camera to its fullest potential like that. I just got it and it didn't have a manual.
     
  16. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Well, hey, if the fisheye is what you want by all means get it. ;)

    Stitching is combining 2 or more photos together to make a larger photo. You'd use stitching to create a panorama, or to get a wider (or taller) shot indoors than is possible with the widest lens that you have.

    Pat yourself on the back, manual control is usually considered an advanced use mode. If you're using it successfully you're ahead of the game. :)
     
  17. fundio

    fundio TalkEmount Rookie

    19
    Apr 10, 2013
    I think i understand. So you take several photos of the surrounding and edit it into one picture?
     
  18. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    That's basically it. Here's a example of how you might use a longer lens to create a larger image. I took these with a 70-200 zoom from about 30 feet or so. In a traditionally stitched shot you'd let the software combine the images by matching the edges and refining the color shifts. In this instance I was going for a "pics laying on the dining room table" kind of thing and not a true stitched shot ,but the concept is the same.

    patchwork050717_01.
     
  19. fundio

    fundio TalkEmount Rookie

    19
    Apr 10, 2013
    That is very cool. I'm assuming when you do that you want to keep camera settings the same? And what software do you use?
     
  20. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    For this pic I left the camera on auto white balance and shot A mode, letting the camera set the shutter speed as needed. Any image editor that supports layers and drop shadows can do this, Photoshop in this case.

    For a normal panorama or stitched shot where you want it to look like a single shot you'd set the white balance manually, use manual focus, A mode. All that assumes you're shooting RAW. I assume it would be the same for jpg, but I've never tried it.

    Then you let the software do the magic. :)