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A7II* IBIS on adapted zoom lenses - how does it work?

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by Ramirez, Oct 17, 2015.

  1. Ramirez

    Ramirez TalkEmount Rookie

    23
    Oct 14, 2015
    I still don't have my A7II yet but I'm trying to prepare workflows beforehand :)

    As I understand, the IBIS on adapted lenses needs to be set manually to corresponding focal length. How does with work with, for example, Tokina 17-35 on Nikon F mount?
    Do I need to manually change the IBIS FL in the menu if I zoom in or out?
    I am trying to figure out how to work with adapted zooms (Nikon F mount in my case) if I want to use IBIS.

    And if I have a lens with OS like my Tamron 70-300 VC (Nikon F mount); can I use the OS in the adapted lens then? Or should I have the VC switch on the Tamron turned off?
     
  2. shaolin95

    shaolin95 TalkEmount Top Veteran

    942
    Jul 3, 2013
    Yes you will need to manually change the zoom settings if the lens is not transmitting any data to the camera which I believe is the case with Nikon.
    If it was for example the Sony A mount adapter then you wouldnt need to change the settings as it will report to the camera so that it can automatically change. I was going to buy the Canon FD 80-200mm F4L but decided otherwise because of that reason (aside from being F4 which is not a speed I feel will be helpful for me with that zoom).
     
  3. Deadbear77

    Deadbear77 TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Sep 14, 2012
    Northeast Ohio
    Kevin
    The commlite adapter for canon ef mount seems to work with the tamron 28-75 f2.8 on the a7rii. I'm pretty sure the ibis is working. I have shot some at 1/6 of a sec without a problem. Focus is slow and sometimes freezes but it's ok most of the time. Just can't get used to a zoom, and autofocus. Got a pretty good deal on the lens and adapter so I thought I would try it.
     
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  4. Ramirez

    Ramirez TalkEmount Rookie

    23
    Oct 14, 2015
    Then I'll threat my Tokina 17-35 as two primes; a 17 prime and a 35 prime. I'll regard the Tokina as two lenses with IBIS :)
    I think I'll mostly use Tokina 17-35/4 and Nikkor 50/1.8G on the A7II as the longer telezooms will be better balanced on Nikon D610.
     
  5. shaolin95

    shaolin95 TalkEmount Top Veteran

    942
    Jul 3, 2013
    Oh yeah that works out good and really when you think about it unless you want fast pace changes in zoom range then adjusting the IBS is still faster than changing a lens then assisting IBS in the case of legacy of course
     
  6. Deadbear77

    Deadbear77 TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Sep 14, 2012
    Northeast Ohio
    Kevin
    On my Minolta 70-210 I set it for 135mm. It works out pretty good for the range.
     
  7. rdfisch

    rdfisch TalkEmount Regular

    181
    Nov 13, 2013
    Northern NJ
    Rick
    What are the consequences of shooting with the FL for IBIS set incorrectly ?
     
  8. NickCyprus

    NickCyprus Super Moderator

    Oct 11, 2012
    Cyprus
    Nick
    As shown in a recent post here by member @slothead@slothead it will result in a blurry photo.
     
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  9. rdfisch

    rdfisch TalkEmount Regular

    181
    Nov 13, 2013
    Northern NJ
    Rick
    Thanks Nick ... so setting it for 600mm when you're using a 14 (almost 4300% error) produces unusable results. I'm curious about a midrange compromise when using a legacy zoom. Deadbear is getting good results set at 135 on a 70-210, but I'm wondering how important it is to reset the FL within the range of a zoom, and if you leave it set in the middle because you don't want to be constantly fiddling with it, at what shutter speed you might be better off disabling the IBIS. This is strictly academic for me at this point, because I don't yet have an IBIS body, and only one legacy zoom ... I just find it fascinating.
     
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  10. Golem

    Golem TalkEmount Rookie

    16
    Oct 21, 2015
    I find that even a 25 to 50% error is a visible problem
    of showing streaking or blur in resulting images. Under
    setting [IBIS at 24 when using a 50mm] does not really
    CREATE blur, it just fails to eliminate [much] blur from
    slow hand held speeds. IOW, a generally soft image.

    OTOH over setting the IBIS results in excess corrective
    motion by that mechanism resulting in decidedly streaky
    contrast points [edges, small highlites, sparklies, etc] as
    opposed to a generalized softness.

    So, the posting about setting a 70-210 at 135 for most
    photos is not ideal. From 70-110 it's over correcting and
    causing streaks generated by the mechanism. Better to
    set 70mm and just be more and more under corrected
    as you zoom out. IOW, worst thing is over correcting,
    next worst in under correcting, and best is having just
    the right amount.

    As mentioned, it sounds kinda "un-zoomy" procedurally,
    but at least you avoid having the sensor exposed every
    time you switch primes, and acoarst the extra tedium of
    swapping prime lenses can distract you into forgetting to
    adjust the IBIS setting ... just like the extra convenience
    of the zoom helps you to work fast enuf to also overlook
    resetting the IBIS for focal length changes :)

    `
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2015
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  11. Sympa

    Sympa TalkEmount Rookie

    15
    Sep 19, 2015
    I would be surprised... all the IBIS does is move the sensor. Whether it moves too much or too little, the result will be blur.
    To give an idea: with IBIS set @50mm and a 50mm lens, the sensor will shift as much as the image moves over teh sensor. The result is a sharp picture despite the movement.
    IBIS @50mm and a 100 mm lens will move the sensor not enough. The longer lens needs a bigger movement. Result is that only half the movement is canceled.
    It becomes really bad if IBIS is set for 200 mm and a 50 mm lens is used. The image moves not so much, but IBIS overcompensates by a factor of 4. The result: 4 steps left and 1 step right: the result is 3 times as much blur as if no IBIS was used.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2015
  12. unlo

    unlo Sony ******

    Jan 19, 2014
    Ohio
    Matt
    ok so here's a ? for those in the know. I have a sigma KIII zoom 75-210 that also (when fully zoomed in) allows for macro focus. Should i be setting the IBIS to 210 for those macro shots? TIA *im assuming 210 till i hear otherwise
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2015
  13. Sympa

    Sympa TalkEmount Rookie

    15
    Sep 19, 2015
    That sigma KIII zoom probably does not extend a lot more when set to 'macro' but instead reduces the focal length? Difficult to say.
     
  14. dbmiller

    dbmiller TalkEmount Top Veteran

    777
    Mar 2, 2012
    New England
    It doesn't actually zoom in any further in macro mode, right? So it's the same focal length you have it set to (75 to 210). You still only get 3-axis stabilization since the camera doesn't know the focus distance in either case to enable the other two axes.
     
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  15. unlo

    unlo Sony ******

    Jan 19, 2014
    Ohio
    Matt
    this is where my confusion lays exactly
     
  16. Golem

    Golem TalkEmount Rookie

    16
    Oct 21, 2015
    You should assume that the Macro feature is
    NOT actually 210 mm IF you hafta engage
    some special mechanism by an extra rotary
    twist or a latch. Some zooms just focus right
    down to 1:4 macro by having sufficient focus
    travel in their focusing cell. The latter type
    would definitely be 210 at macro.

    If you have the other type, you need to try
    to estimate the working FL when the Macro
    mechanism is engaged. You could engage it
    and view something at normal distance even
    tho the image of it is quite fuzzy. If you can
    see just enuf to determine the field of view,
    then you can view the same subject using
    the normal focus range and find which FL
    gives that same field of view.

    If the view in macro is waaaay too out of
    focus to judge the field of view, stop down
    the lens and acoarst you do this is really
    bright light.


    `