A little waterfall

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by TonyTurley, Jul 3, 2013.

  1. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Some photos of a little waterfall not far from my house. It sits right next to a busy secondary road. The waterfall really isn't all that special; it drops about two feet over a rock shelf into a deeper pool, and is surrounded by Tiger Lillies, Black Willow, and other flora. For some reason, though, that spot intrigues me. Anyway, here are a couple of photos, with one looking east along the road from where I was standing. These are preliminary edits, and I plan on doing more in-depth edits using the RAW files. I was using a Vivitar 28/2.8 Close Focus with a 4-stop ND filter. Unfortunately, the opposite bank was in deep shadow, and where I was standing was in bright sunlight, as the second photo shows. I need to figure out how to recover the washed out foreground plants.

    Tony

    DSC04091_zps97f9cff9.

    DSC04095_zps7a87d417.

    DSC04096_zps6f0114bf.
     
  2. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Lovely, just need to go there at a different time of the day.
     
  3. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    Great, Tony. These photos look really nice and filmic :) Lens? Processing? Both?
     
  4. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks Super Moderator

    Dec 12, 2012
    Ashland, OR, USA
    David
    You may be able to get what you're after if you expose for the bright foreground more, and then bring up the shadows in post. One of the great things about digital and raw: you can try it both ways.
     
  5. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    Maybe something like this?



    No thought behind it, just twiddled the sliders thus in LR4: Highlights (-100), Contrast (+37), Shadows (+8), Blacks (+2), Clarity (+33), Vibrance (-2), Saturation (+12)
     
  6. Bimjo

    Bimjo Super Moderator

    Oct 28, 2011
    Washington State
    Jim
    Here's an instances where bracketing shots can save the day. You can make a HDR shot, or you can layer two shots and then combine them by erasing the parts you dont' want from one of the shots. This may be more difficult seeing as you're not running Windows or OS X, but it shuld still be doable.

    Just thought of something- in PS you can create a mid gray "dodge & burn" layer and set the opacity to "soft light". Then you use either a white or black brush to lighten/darken selected areas of the pic to your liking. I have no idea if GIMP has this ability, but it's worth looking into.
     
  7. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Thanks for the comments, guys. Jaf, your edit is indeed much better. The originals were done using the ND filter, lens set at f/16, and camera ISO 100. That let me use a long shutter speed to get the effects on the water. Dave, I don't know if I'll be going back to that spot. People travel way too fast on that road, and having cars whiz past at 50mph only 3 feet away was rather uncomfortable. I was ready to leap over the ledge into the creek if anyone looked like they were coming toward me. A broken leg would have been much preferable to roadkill.

    Although I've been taking pictures a long time, until recently I had never gone beyong adjusting brightness/contrast, and sometimes color. I'm still learning all of the uses for the many sliders. The one drawback to GIMP is it will not accept a 16-bit TIFF, which I usually create as an intermediate layer. It reduces the color depth to 8 bits. Fotoxx doesn't have nearly as much capability as GIMP, but it accepts 16-bit TIFF. Odd.

    Tony
     
  8. davect01

    davect01 Super Moderator

    Aug 20, 2011
    Fountain Hills, AZ
    Dave
    Ya, don't hurt yourself getting a shot.

    The edited version was pretty nice.
     
  9. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Yeah, I like Jaf's edit.
     
  10. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    Actually, this is one of the strengths of Lightroom. It is exceedingly good att recovering blown out highlights.

    I personally hate those big white splodges in photos so before getting LR4 I used to be obsessive about light metering. Now I don't pay that much attention to it because I know I can fix it with one slider in LR.

    Also with brushes and masks you can adjust exposure if there are big differences in brightness in different parts of the picture.
     
  11. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Here is an attempt using RawTherapee to manipulate the original RAW file. I boosted the blacks and contrast a bit, while using the Highlight Recovery slider to work on the blown out foreground plants. This JPEG output is much better than the original JPEG from the camera. I was not able to get the foreground green as rich as I'd like using RawTherapee. I admit that might just be due to my unfamiliarity with the software. The learning curve continues.

    Tony
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Deadbear77

    Deadbear77 TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Sep 14, 2012
    Northeast Ohio
    Kevin
    Hey tony... Here's my try. Sorry I just tried on my phone.

    ImageUploadedByTalkNEX1372955879.710923.


    Sent from my iPhone using TalkNEX mobile app
     
  13. Jaf-Photo

    Jaf-Photo TalkEmount Veteran

    484
    Mar 25, 2013
    That looks really good. Much richer, deeper and sharper and highlights are recovered as far as possible, I think.
     
  14. TonyTurley

    TonyTurley TalkEmount Hall of Famer

    Apr 24, 2013
    West Virginia, USA
    Thanks Jaf. Kevin, that's not bad for using a phone. It does lot pretty saturated on my monitor, though.

    Tony